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Old May 16, 2007, 10:36 AM   #11
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mtngal wrote:
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Very cool! I don't know that I've ever seen one outside of a zoo - they are cute looking.
Good morning to YA!!! mtngal. I have had a bunch of E-mails asking about them so here is some information.

Most muskrats build their homes, called lodges, out of branches, mud, cattails, and other aquatic plants. They also have a feeding hut built near the main lodge. These lodges are used for a bedroom, a warm place to stay in the winter, and a place to hide from predators. These lodges look just like a three-foot mound of sticks and plants. They keep muskrats warm in the winter, because they are coated with multiple layers of mud, which insulate the lodge. They also hollow out tunnels inside the mound for a quick getaway in case of an emergency, and for easy access in and out of the lodge. From above, no channel is visible. Muskrats are willing to feed on everything including cattail roots , clams, crayfish, frogs, rough fish, and carrion (dead animals). They become a meal for , among others, foxes, mink, great-horned owls, herons, and hawks.


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Old May 16, 2007, 10:38 AM   #12
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Good morning Tom. Nice capture and you even got him in the sun.


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Old May 16, 2007, 10:40 AM   #13
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Hayward wrote:
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Roger... time has come I just HAVE to ask you about your avatar.....

Now that is just astounding LUCK maybe.... but you did photoshop (or other) that didn't you?

PS have you ever seen Muskrat Love??? Does it live up to the song?:?
Hi Hayward, YUP!!!! I did the avatar in Corel Photo Paint. I haven't been lucky enough to catch that kind of photo. Nope I haven't seen Muskrat Love.


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Old May 16, 2007, 2:51 PM   #14
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Great shots as always Roger.

One thing, what setting do you use for the focus. Is it on auto or center? Do you select it yourself?




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Old May 16, 2007, 3:23 PM   #15
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Dal1970 wrote:
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Great shots as always Roger.

One thing, what setting do you use for the focus. Is it on auto or center? Do you select it yourself?




Darren
Darren it is on auto. Thanks for the kind comment and for looking.


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Old May 17, 2007, 1:09 AM   #16
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Dal1970 wrote:
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One thing, what setting do you use for the focus. Is it on auto or center? Do you select it yourself?
Personally I find myself (other than just casual/snap shoting).... unsing center focus pretty exclusively.

With shallow DOF either close up or long lens at full zoom (again very shallow DOF)....matrix AF can just choose the wrong point.... might take half holding shutter and reframing but center point AF always gets what you intend as the focal point.

And for instance shooting a bird against flat cludless sky... center point also works better (and faster), Matrix will tend to just get lost if bird not a major part of the image.
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Old May 17, 2007, 10:56 AM   #17
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Hayward wrote:
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Dal1970 wrote:
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One thing, what setting do you use for the focus. Is it on auto or center? Do you select it yourself?
Personally I find myself (other than just casual/snap shoting).... unsing center focus pretty exclusively.

With shallow DOF either close up or long lens at full zoom (again very shallow DOF)....matrix AF can just choose the wrong point.... might take half holding shutter and reframing but center point AF always gets what you intend as the focal point.

And for instance shooting a bird against flat cludless sky... center point also works better (and faster), Matrix will tend to just get lost if bird not a major part of the image.
Thanks for the idea. I am going to try that.


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Old May 18, 2007, 12:22 AM   #18
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Great shots, cute critters, well taken.
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Old May 18, 2007, 11:57 AM   #19
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Rodney9 wrote:
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Great shots, cute critters, well taken.
Hi Rodney, thanks for the kind words and for looking.


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Old May 18, 2007, 8:56 PM   #20
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I have had a few folks ask Beaver or Muskrat how do you know????

Beaver or Muskrat

Tails are the key. The beaver's broad, flat tail does not show during swimming.

If you see a slim, round tail held out of the water or swaying back and forth on top of the water, the animal is nutria (or a muskrat).

There it is! But now its gone. Was it a Muskrat or a Beaver? These two fur-bearing mammals inhabit similar habitats and share some fascinating traits yet are quite different. The Muskrat is not a close relative of the Beaver, but rather a large field mouse that has adapted to life in and around the water.

Both species are active year round, even when the water is frozen over. When in a relaxed state, they can remain submerged for up to 15 minutes, but 2 or 3 minutes is most common. They both have lips that close behind their incisors enabling them to gnaw and chew plantlife while under water. Non-aquatic mammals would have great difficulty in trying to chew on a large object under water, because water would enter the mouth, throat and nasal passages.

The most obvious physical differences are in size, weight, hind feet and tail. Beaver are considerably bigger weighing (depending upon age, sex and season) an average of 20 kg (44 lb) as compared to about 1.5 kg (3.3 lb) for the average muskrat. When swimming it may be difficult to clearly see the tail. Beaver have the characteristic flat tail and Muskrat have a long rodent-like "rat" tail. The hind feet of a Muskrat are not webbed whereas a Beaver's are webbed.


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