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Old Jun 9, 2007, 10:49 AM   #11
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Thanks, Alan. I wonder if a permanent marker could be used. That way it wouldn't fade away or be wiped off. I think I have some fine tipped ones. I did recently purchase some battery cases from Thomas Distributing when I bought my new charger. So far the sets have stayed together as purchased. But, there are 4 adults living in our house that you never know what happens to batteries around here. Think I'll try your way of writing on them.

Yes, you have seen me in the biweekly challenge. I may not submit the greatest photos, but I figure it helps me to improve. See you there. This sun's rays challenge is going to be a bit of a real challenge for me with the next 5 days forecast being rain, rain, rain.:-) But, I'll do Harriet challenge here, too. Kind of follows nicely with what we just did in the bi-weekly.
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Old Jun 9, 2007, 5:26 PM   #12
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I use small stick-on colored signal dots (by Avery or Dennison) - a different color on each set. They can be gotten in stationery stores, and are ideal for this purpose.

You can get inexpensive convenient plastic storage cases in 4 cell and 8 cell sizes from Thomas Distributing - they can be purchased separately or are provided free with purchases of batteries and chargers.

I have never been aware of that exposure problem myself - usually my improper exposures result from "operator error" - careless placement of the sensor(s) over the important parts of the image, or a wrong selection of sensors (averaging instead of spot, for instance). I routinely swap out batteries as soon as the low battery signal appears (even though I could in a pinch still get additional shots) since digital cameras are electrically powered and work best at proper voltage levels. I just got a neat little battery tester (EC-741 Universal Battery Tester) from Thomas (along with a new model MAHA MH-C8000S 8 cell chargert). The tester has an LED "5-leveel fuel guage" which is incremental and therefore less ambiguous to read than the usual multitester needle scale - my K100D shows a warning with 60% power remaining (3 of the 5 LEDs lit), which still reads in the green "good" range on my old needle guage battery tester where I normally would have continued to use the batteries thinking them still good until the camera quit. This tells me that the designers of the camera want near recommended peak battery voltage available for proper or reliable operation.

Remember that the CCD requires electricity to record the image; even though the chip is supposed to have an all-or-nothnig response, itcould be possible that a drop in voltagemight result in a poorer quality image being recorded by some cameras before failing to record at all. Check your voltage levels when the "brown-outs"occur and see how low they are, and remember also that when batteries are removed, the drainstops and some recovery can occur, so that when they are put back in after a "rest" the voltagecan bemarginally higher for a short time. Batteries arranged in series are also drawn down differently depending on their position, so changing their position on reinsertion can also make a difference (try reversing thesequence of thebatteries in your flashlight, radio, or tv remote control the next time they run down, and you will see this pheomenon for yourself). Rechargeable batteries also require periodical conditioning in order to continue functioning properly - a charger such as the MAHA model mentioned above (or others) can perform this function for you.

Hope this helps.
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Old Jun 10, 2007, 2:10 PM   #13
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Thanks, penolta.

In the past I've always used CRV3's and used them until they died. Didn't notice any problems with the settings, the camera would just stop.

I'm no electrical person, but I wonder if the rechargeables just can't give the camera a full blast of energy when needed when they start to get low. It seems to work in manual mode fine when at this stage. But, maybe in auto it is requiring more of the battery's power to adjust. I haven't had it happen in over a week now. Will watch what happens if it does again.

I did buy some cases from Thomas and a tester. Just a needle one, though. And, I bought the 401 charger that I believe does do the conditioning. Can't remember now I read about so many before deciding on that one.

Anyway, thanks for everyone's input. I'll keep watching the camera to see what it does as the batteries get low again.

Patty
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Old Jun 11, 2007, 12:11 PM   #14
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penolta wrote:
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.............Batteries arranged in series are also drawn down differently depending on their position, so changing their position on reinsertion can also make a difference (try reversing thesequence of thebatteries in your flashlight, radio, or tv remote control the next time they run down, and you will see this pheomenon for yourself).........
I have posted a new topic to discuss this issue over in the 'Batteries and Power Supplies' forum...

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=51

Alan T
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