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Old Sep 5, 2007, 7:05 PM   #1
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One of the commonest and widespread butterflies in North America, the non-native Cabbage White was introduced from Europe about 1860.

K10D with Tamron 70-300 LD at 300mm in macro mode. Hand held in full sun.

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Old Sep 5, 2007, 7:05 PM   #2
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 7:06 PM   #3
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 7:06 PM   #4
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P,
lot of nice detail in this. bet it's even better on a larger size.

roy
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 7:43 PM   #5
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robar wrote:
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P,
lot of nice detail in this. bet it's even better on a larger size.

roy
Roy, you are right in that they were plenty sharp before downsizing, but it is a rather plain butterfly, and counting hairs isn't required for identification- I was as much interested in the composition as the subject, and so wanted the entire frame on the screen without scrolling - in hindsight they could have been a little larger and still fit. Here is a largerone of the isolated butterfly to show what the lens is capable of:

Thanks for looking and commenting.
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 8:23 PM   #6
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actually i meant your first posts at 800 on the long side
wish the exif was in there also.
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 8:41 PM   #7
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You got him good on all of them.


TOTALLY WACKY roger
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 11:15 PM   #8
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One of these returned later to the same milkweed flowers and got a foot caught in the blossom - my wife went to free it, but it broke away on its own. See the following thread for an explanation of how the specialized pollination mechanism of these flowers works (about 8 replies down in the list).

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...amp;forum_id=7
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 11:35 PM   #9
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They might be common, but these pictures have so much detail. Wonderful shots.
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Old Sep 23, 2007, 10:43 PM   #10
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Thanks, Harriet. The amount of detail surprised me, since they were white butterflies taken in full sun - I expected the highlights to be blown, but the angle of the light apparently was sufficiently oblique to bring out thesurface featureswithout losing them in reflective glare.
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