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Old Sep 11, 2007, 2:10 PM   #11
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This is a brilliant sequence, but how long did it take you from start to finish?
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 3:30 PM   #12
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dr. p, you show a lot of patience to do this. VERY well done and thank you.

roy
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 4:07 PM   #13
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Wow! Wonderful series - it really is fascinating tolook at the life cycle of a beautifulbutterfly. Saw my first Monarch of the year today, so it was a nice addition to see your series of pictures.
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 4:13 PM   #14
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Thanks everyone. The freedom to do something like this is one of the perks of retirement.

2many wrote:
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This is a brilliant sequence, but how long did it take you from start to finish?
The last 8 pictures (from first emergence) were taken over a span of 11 minutes; the first (of the last eight) is time stamped 8:54 and the next 5 are all 8:55 -- coming out is fast, getting the wings extended takes longer, and the hardening takes about 2 hours before it can fly off.

The technical details: K100D with Promaster 100mm macro, hand held with flash.

And itis a female.
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 7:19 PM   #15
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fascinating! Great job on documenting this, I think this is interesting to anyone looking at these photos.

Tom
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 7:40 PM   #16
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Hi penolta,

This is fascinating stuff! -- and well done! I don't think I've ever seen this documented so well. I'm really glad that you were able to complete the series this season.

How often did you have to check it to be able to get the emergence? Was it a matter of just waiting there once it turned black, or was it a matter of luck?

Scott
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 12:05 PM   #17
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Thanks Tom and Scott

snostorm wrote:
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How often did you have to check it to be able to get the emergence? Was it a matter of just waiting there once it turned black, or was it a matter of luck?

Scott
The chrysalis turns black before emergence - after that it is just a matter of watching and waiting, which is easier said than done. If you see it black in the evening, it will come out the next morning, anytime between dawn and noon, probably depending on the temperature. There were five in this group that we were watching, and we missed the first four - once it starts, it happens fast. I was lucky to get the last one - we were checking the others at intervals that got down to 10 minutes and we still missed - this time Iwas standing there waiting. It became obvious that it happened fast, but I hadn't realized quite how fast. I took pictures every half hour or so of several of them - I know now (after seeing the pictures) that the appearance of the opaque white side is the signal of the impending event. When the green chrysalis shows wing veins the change to black is not far behind, and the black chrysalis becomes cloudy as air gets in and separates the covering from the butterfly(flash pictures let you see more through the coveringthan those without, so you need to review your pictures as you take them).
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Old Sep 13, 2007, 6:37 AM   #18
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As noted by others, these really belong in a text book, very well exposed and crisp, better than what I'm used to seeing in my kid's science books.
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Old Sep 23, 2007, 10:01 PM   #19
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Thanks, Cybercoyote. It is lucky I was able to finish it when I did. We had an unseasonable stor two nights ago that was hard on the Monarchs - a few survived, but are pretty beaten up. Some caterpillars are left, so if it isn't too late in the season for them to complete their development, they may rpopulate the yard.
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