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Old Sep 27, 2007, 3:09 PM   #11
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LOL! At least you get the blur of one. There's at least one (and I think there's a breeding pair) of hawks that hang around our area - I hear their call quite often. However, I have yet to actually see one, except wwwaaay up there soaring on the air currents, too far to identify.
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Old Sep 27, 2007, 7:10 PM   #12
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snostorm wrote:
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Hi All,

I was coming home from the Opthamologist's office, wearing shades because my pupils were still dilated from the drops. . . I couldn't really see well, but noticed that there was a big bird in one of the dead trees just off the parking lot. I drove closer, and could almost tell it was a hawk. I grabbed the K10 w/ FA*300/4.5 and 1.7x AFA and, totally trusting the AF, got about 10 shots off before the hawk decided he'd had enough.

These are about 1/4 frame crops, PP'd for PF , then resized and sharpened a touch .

Scott
Scott

Chicago has quite of bit of wildlife this time of yr? Amazing shots particularly when you were engaged in impaired driving and impaired shooting as well.

One quick question: Was it a fine day but with no direct sunlight? If it was bright, would you K10D meter correctly?

Daniel


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Old Sep 27, 2007, 10:20 PM   #13
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danielchtong wrote:
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Scott

Chicago has quite of bit of wildlife this time of yr? Amazing shots particularly when you were engaged in impaired driving and impaired shooting as well.

One quick question: Was it a fine day but with no direct sunlight? If it was bright, would you K10D meter correctly?

Daniel

Hi Daniel,

Chicago always has a lot of wildlife, but I guess you're probably referring to the furred and feathered kind. . .:-)

Seriously, there's more than most realize, as I found when I started concentrating on shooting birds. We have some anomalies, like a pair of bald eagles that have been nesting somewhere south and west of the city for the past few years. I've heard of them, but those that know aren't telling exactly where they are, and hope that the location won't become general knowledge for obvious reasons.

There are two colonies of parakeets that live year-round on the outskirts of the city-proper (escaped pets that banded together for survival, and have been breeding successfully in their large communal nests. A number of Peregrine falcons were released by the city in an attempt to control the pigeon population, but instead of staying in the city and doing the intended job, they now are commonly seen in most of the suburbs, and nowwe don't have much of a pigeon problem. . .:-)

A Coyote wandered into a downtown store and settled into their icecream cooler this last summer, and just sat there until animal control came , picked it up and released it a more reasonable surrounding. I've seen a number of them wandering around singly in the suburban forest preserves where I look for birds. Most probably think that they are scruffy dogs.

We get a lot of migratory birds following the western shore of Lake Michigan up towards Wisconsin, UP Michigan, and Canada, but there are a lot of species that others seem to find that I've never seen, and I've not had much luck during the southern migration, so I'm obviously not the best source for this info.

Many of the forest preserve areas are close to being overrun by deer, and just about every pond or lake has unreasonable numbers of Canada Geese and Mallards, and gulls too. Many of the geese and ducks no longer migrate south, and stay year-round. When I moved out to the 'burbs" almost 30 years ago, the only time we saw Canada geese were as they passed over in the spring and fall during migration, and it was a rare enough sight to cause real excitement. Now, they are everywhere.

There's a great resistance to culling the deer herds from the IMO misguided animal rights people who are more into thinking that they are protecting Bambi than realizing that they are actually sentencing many to starve to death in the winter -- which is much more cruel.

I'm sure that the great majority of people don't ever notice the variety that we have here. I know I didn't until I started seriously birding.

I assume that you don't want to hear about the two-legged wildlife. . . I don't know much about that anyway. . .:-)

That day there was a 10 minute microburst that blew through very quickly and then there were some clouds sometime obscuring the sun, so the lighting was changing all the time from reasonably bright diffused light to direct late afternoon sun during the short time I was shooting the hawk. I switched from 0 to +1/3 stop Ev comp when a cloud partially obscurred the sun during that time. On spot metering, the K10 did really well as far as metering is concerned. the camera really earned it's keep here as I only held it in the about right direction. . .

Scott
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Old Sep 28, 2007, 2:07 PM   #14
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The feather replacement in #1 doesn't work because the dark band at the base of the feather doesn't line up with the bands in the feathers to the left of it - perhaps the band spacing on the substituted feather is different. In #1 there is a gap in the white under tail coverts that does not exist in #2 because of a different position of the tail or else a different perspective - perhaps you could fill in the gap with white feathers that would cover the dark basal band?

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I'm surprised that nobody commented about the purple fringing I was seeing with my pupils dilated -- maybe I'm the only one that thinks it strange. . . I always thought that it was just a lens/camera thing.
I didn't respond because I have no certain explanation - and I suspect no one else did either - if they do, I would like to hear it, too. Were you wearing sunshields when you saw the colors? It could have ben from those, but unexplanable things can happen. I used to see polarized light with one eye; I attributed it to the astigmatism in that eye (usually from the cornea), but after I developed cataracts and had them replaced with implants I lost that ability, so it must have been due to some aberrant property of the lens itself (I never got an explanationfor that). If you were not wearing sunshields, and you have had cataract replacements, the chromatic aberration might be due to the artificial lenses - if not, you might be developing cataracts, but that is for your opthmalogist to determine. When the irises are dilated the edges of the lenses are exposed to direct illumination from which they are normally shielded by the constricted iris, so it could be nothing more than that, but it is something I have never experienced. Sometimes you cannot get an explanation from someone who has never experienced the phenomenon for themselves; for instance, my opthalmologist was dumfounded when I told him I could see (and draw for him) my cataracts when I lookedthrough the oculars of my microscope (which is due to some optical property of those lenses that is not present in the optical formulation of telescope or binocular lenses in which I could not see them).

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Old Sep 28, 2007, 3:57 PM   #15
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Scott,

Great pictures! I don't think that I have ever seen a hawk perching with his tail feathers spread like that. I think that you got really lucky, and took great advantage.

John
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Old Sep 28, 2007, 9:09 PM   #16
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Scott

John brought it up. I hardly see the tail feather spread out like like what you did. You have done a lot more homework on wildlife shooting (habitat, migration path, weather pattern...)than I thought. In Toronto I just follow the others. 9/10 times I came back empty handed. Shooting seagull are the ony game that I am practicing .

Daniel, Toronto
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