Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 29, 2007, 2:11 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Wingman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Hebron, Kentucky (northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati):KCVG
Posts: 4,327
Default

For those who are following my quest for the perfect digital image from a slide (transparency), I tried another test earlier today. The first images shown below were captured as follows.

1. Opteka Slide Copier (Pentax 50-200 mm)

2. Sigma 70-300 APO DGin macro mode; slide mounted to a light box

3. Slide projected onto a screen (image size approx.2.5 ft x1.5 ft) and photographed with the Sigma 70-300 DG APO (not in macro mode). I projected the imageonto a piece of white foam board (i.e. smooth surface in order to avoid any texture) and used a Kodak Ektachrome slide projector in a dark room.

All images were captured in RAW and sharpening applied as PP.

To my eyes, the Opteka (Image#1)gives the sharpest image. Therefore, if I were to declare a winner, the Opteka gets the blue ribbon!

Jay

Using the Opteka:



Using the Sigma 70-300 APO DG in macro mode



Using a Slide projected on to screen



Wingman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 29, 2007, 3:27 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Monza76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,095
Default

I agree.

Ira
Monza76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 12:55 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
CyberCoyote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 257
Default

Without a doubt the right winner.
CyberCoyote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 2:26 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

Agree, but what about cropping? Is there any device that actually give you the full picture, literally.

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 8:26 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Monza76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,095
Default

bilybianca wrote:
Quote:
Agree, but what about cropping? Is there any device that actually give you the full picture, literally.

Kjell
Yes, I wonder if some of these manufacturers will start selling a modified version for a 2X crop factor (so the 4/3rds guys can use it too). This cannot be a big engineering issue,my current copierhas the zoom capability so if it could show the full frame at the 2X crop factor it could then adjust for the 1.6X or 1.5X or 1.3X of other cameras. I have not worked with many slides because when shooting slide film I did close cropping in the viewfinder, that means that many of them cannot be digitized this way becuase too much is lost.

Ira
Monza76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 10:11 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Wingman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Hebron, Kentucky (northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati):KCVG
Posts: 4,327
Default

bilybianca wrote:
Quote:
Agree, but what about cropping? Is there any device that actually give you the full picture, literally.

Kjell
Kjell,

Cropping is less of an issue than one might think. In using the Opteka, you can set your zoom (using trial and error for the intial set up) to capture the image plus a trace of the slide frame. Then in PP, simply crop down a smidgeon to eliminate the frame. Also, if you have a slide that was taken in the portrait orientation, insert it into the copier in the landscape orientation and then rotate as part of PP. Once the zoom lenth is set, there is no need to adjust for each slide.

As I mentioned in a previous post, in copying these old slides, cropping is actually necessary as is straightening crooked horizons, etc to improve the compositions.

Last night I continued to try capturing images projected from a slide projector, by moving a projector closer to the screen and thereby photographing a smaller projected image. The thinking here was to improve sharpness. However, the results were not significantly better. For now, I will proceed with the Opteka copier. 200 slides done...about 1800 to go

Jay
Wingman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 1:41 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

Well, my problem is the same as Ira's. I've got quite a few slides that are well composed and just can't be cropped at all without loosing to much of their appeal. Seems like this is a problem with many devices, like old bellows copiers. The Opteka obviously does the job the way I want it to, so I put it on the wish list.

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 7:05 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Most SLR viewfinders do not show 100% of the frame anyway, so no matter howtightthe viewfinder cropping is, there should be a little extra margin of safety in the actual image. FWIW,the Opteka (and Bower) copiers will give the full frame, but you have to be careful centering the frame because you cannot easily distinguish the edges of the frameagainst the black background. There is a "nosepiece" (for want of a better name) that holds the diffuser and accepts a slide carrier that holds two frames (but you can insert them manually if you wish without using the carrier). The "nosepiece adjusts verticqally, and the slides can be moved horizontallybut there are no detents to hold them in place so you can unintentionally crop one ot two edges if you do not notice that the slide has been moved. The "nosepiece" can alsobe rotated to correct tilted horizons,and has a thumbscrew that must be used to lock it or you can rotate it a bit without being aware of it,but there is a slight bit of play even when locked. If exact framing is important, the need for constant verification will slow the operation. This is the only criticism I have of the device, but the ability to make the adjustments it allows makes it worthwhile. The slide carrier has only one clip on one side of each slide, and so there is a possibility a slide may not be held exactly flat, but the springs for holding slides without the carrier will hold them flat (positioning them this way is more time consuming); this should not be a problem unless the slide is warped. Personally, I find the device quite useful; none of these issues is insurmountable, and with familiarity should cease to be annoying, but prospective purchasers should be aware of them so they do not discard it thinking they made a bad purchase after trying it only once. Like many more technologically complex devices it takes some getting used to.


penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 30, 2007, 9:33 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Wingman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Hebron, Kentucky (northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati):KCVG
Posts: 4,327
Default

Thanks for providing all of the nuances of operating the Opteka...Everything Penolta has mentioned is 100% accurate. Just like many things, to get a good result, it takes some patience and care. The device works well if you understand and use all of the features which are designed to ensure you get a good result.

Jay
Wingman is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:05 AM.