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Old Nov 19, 2007, 7:32 PM   #1
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This is a 2 fold question, feel free to answer one or both.

I have an older pentax off camera flash cord (used on a film mz7 or something like that, p7 maybe) will that work in pttl on new digitals? If not, do I need to replace the whole thing (they come in 3 parts, camera part, cord and flash part) or just parts of it?

That leads me to my question: what is the real advantage of a flash bracket? If you are using a hotshoe flash, what is the point of putting it on a bracket anyway?

Thanks
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 7:42 PM   #2
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what pentax parts are you using?? model numbers??
why would the cords even matter if the flash is on the camera???
where is the flash going when you take it off camera if not a grip?? i use offcamera flash and a grip a lot for macros to get the light where i want it. people use a grip for portraits to get the flash higher than the cam to eliminate redeye and shadows.

roy
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 10:32 PM   #3
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Not sure of the part numbers without digging them out. I'd be using the cord to get the flash off camera for portraits. However, I thought that even a hot shoe flash will reduce red eye and shadows, so what is the point of getting it even higher above the lens?
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 11:05 PM   #4
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shadows for 1 thing..

model of cords?? 4p or 5p ??
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 11:05 PM   #5
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better yet post a good pic of the modules..

roy
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 11:10 PM   #6
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Hi fe4,

The cord might work, but it needs to be the 5 lead version, which means that it has to have four contacts on the hotshoe plate + the side clamps which are a ground lead. If yours has the five leads, it'll work with P-TTL, otherwise not -- if it just has 4 leads, then it's just about as good as a two lead non-dedicated hotshoe to hotshoe cord for exposure and metering purposes with a Pentax DSLR.

As far as use -- It really depends on the bracket. A straight bracket allows you to place the flash to either side of the camera body. Some have a handle with a shoe on top of it, which moves the flash to the side and above the camera, and flip type brackets attempt to keep the flash head located above the camera whether it's in landscape or portrait orientation, giving all your shots the same kind of look. Some do this with a hinged arm, some have a flexible arm, and at least one allows rotation of the camera body on the bracket while the flash gun is stationary. These allow a non-rotating head flash to be bounced in the same fashion as a tilt and rotating head flash unit (in just about every direction).

By placing the flash further from the lens, redeye is effectively eliminated, and placement to either side of the body can add a little bit of shadow to give the image depth. If the bracket offsets the flash head enough, it can lessen the flat "camera as the source of light" look that many people associate with flash shots (and usually don't like). Not as good as more remote flash locations, but a lot more easily mobile for weddings and other events.

I've also combined a couple of straight brackets to place the flash to the side and in front of the camera body for macros, so I guess that the easy answer is that a bracket(s) allows you to relocate the flash while still keeping it attached to the camera as a single unit.

Scott
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Old Nov 19, 2007, 11:28 PM   #7
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Thanks for your responses guys, I had to dig it out an have a look. (I can't post a pic from the computer I am on now). There are no numbers to be found on it anywhere. I did count the leads and it has the 4 matching connectors on the hotshoe and flash peice that match up with the connectors on my K110d and flashes. The cord has 5 pins on it. So does that mean I'm good to go with pttl?
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Old Nov 20, 2007, 12:01 AM   #8
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that sounds like a 5P connection. both ends of the cord should be round. are they??what flash are you using it on??

roy
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Old Nov 20, 2007, 11:26 AM   #9
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Yes, both ends are round. I will be using it on the Pentax 540 or the Sigma 530 Super.
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Old Nov 20, 2007, 11:47 AM   #10
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if it's the 5p then you just saved $100..

redeye happens when the back of the eye reflects the flash. the further away from the camera the less chance of it happening. you want the flash directly over the lens so it casts the shadow down and behind the subject.

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