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Old Dec 6, 2007, 12:12 AM   #1
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I went back to the water plant that fascinates me so much at the Botanical Garden. I wanted to try out some ideas and just try to get some decent pictures, especially since several other peopleseem to also find my other picture interesting.

There wasn't any label on it, so I'm still clueless as to what it is. To give you some idea of what it looks like, here's the "pot" it's planted in.


K10, DA*50-135, no flash

This isn't a very good shot, but it does what I wanted it to do - it gives you an idea of how big the leaves are. The OOF lens cap at the lower right isthe 67mm lens cap belonging to the DA*50-135. Obviously I should have used flash and a smaller aperture!


K10, DA*50-135 at f2.8, no flash.

This was taken with the in-camera flash only. It's a descriptive picture but not very artistic. I wanted to give someone an idea of what the plant looks like, before I got really close to it.


K10, Vivitar 105mm macro, in-camera flash.

The rest were taken with the flash off-camera, being fired wireless. I only used the in-camera flash for control, not for additional light. I'm going to post too many, but I can't make up my mind which ones to leave out. This is a little closer:


K10, Viv 105mm

This is the outside of the leaves:


K10, Viv 105mm

The hooks on the inside of the leaves. I'm really disappointed with this one, I know I need to work on finding a better diffuser than a piece of vellum (I'll try a piece of mylar next).



I got frustrated because I either got too much light or not enough light, and some pictures I had both at the same time. I also figured out that having a tripod for either the camera or the flash would help a great deal - I couldn't hold the camera in one hand and the flash where I wanted the light to come from. In all of these pictures, I perched the flash on the side of the "pot."





It's great tohave enough lightto use really small apertures, and I'm going to have to really start reading about flash photography. The more I play with it, the more I find out how much there is to learn about it all, and how to best use it. It is a wonderful tool!
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Old Dec 6, 2007, 12:48 AM   #2
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I'm not quite sure, but I think the plant is a Salvinia natans. Penolta?

Kjell
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Old Dec 6, 2007, 8:31 AM   #3
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I think you've discovered a natural source of velcro! :-)
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Old Dec 6, 2007, 1:46 PM   #4
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bilybianca wrote:
Quote:
I'm not quite sure, but I think the plant is a Salvinia natans. Penolta?

Kjell
Good work, Kjell- it certainly is a Salvinia but the species are said tobevery difficult to tell apart.

The following is from a USGS web page:

"Identification: Floating, rootless aquatic fern. Consists of horizontal stemsthat float just below the water surface, and produce at each node, a pair of floating or emergent leaves. Floating and emergent leaves are green in color and ovate to oblong in shape. Plants bear a third leafthat is brown, highly divided and dangles underwater. Submersed leaves are commonly mistaken as roots. They may grow to great lengths, and by creating drag, act to stabilize the plant.


Upper surfacesof green leaves are covered with rows of white, bristly hairs. The stalks of each divide into four thin branches that soon rejoin at the tips to form a cage. The resulting structures resemble tiny eggbeaters. Cage-like hairs may be damaged on mature leaves, thereby not appearing true to this description. Young, unfolding leaves will, however, reveal intact structures. These specialized hairs create a water repellant, protective covering. "[/quote][/quote]



[align=left]Those "eggbeater" hairs are what led me to think it might be a carnivorous plant, which it is not. As an introduced plant, it is just another aquatic weed, but an interesting one, nonetheless![/align]
[align=left]Harriet, your pictures are better than those I found on the internet - especially of the "eggbeaters!"![/align]
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Old Dec 6, 2007, 5:09 PM   #5
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Thanks for the information! Those hairshave beenreally difficult to photograph - I've tried several times in the past to get something that shows them but haven't been able to due to no tripod and no decent light. The flash made a huge difference, though I might try again using mylar instead of vellum. The vellum passes too much light, I played with a piece of vellum today with better, more even light.
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