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Old Dec 28, 2007, 10:49 PM   #1
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Travellers, be advised: beginning January 1 2008, passengers will no longer be allowed to carry loose lithium batteries in their checked luggage. Passengers will be allowed check baggage with lithium batteries only if they are already installed in devices. Batteries can be placed in carry-on baggage, so long as they are in clear plastic bags (limit 2 per passenger).

Original article here: http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/tech...ss&oref=slogin
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 12:19 AM   #2
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good info for anyone traveling. i wonder what is going to happen to all those li-ion batteries tsa confiscates?
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 3:33 AM   #3
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Interesting, although currently only applies to flights starting in the USA.

So if you were travelling from the UK to the USA there would be no outward restriction but there would be the 2 spare batteries limit coming back. So, no confusion there!
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 5:13 AM   #4
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As a prolific traveller I am watching this carefully.

I have three Lithium ion batteries, two in the camera (K10D with grip) and one on my Epson Selphy post card printer.

I am concerned about the 8gm limit issue on spare batteries, as the Canon printer battery is never installed unless I am printing as it attaches to the outside of the printer and not internally.

I will let you know how I go when I fly to Dubai next week.

Crash
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 11:25 AM   #5
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To quote the AP story:

"The ban affects shipments of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, such as those made by Energizer Holdings Inc. and Procter & Gamble Co.'s Duracell brand."

The lithium cells most of us use (e.g., for the K10D) are rechargeable and not considered as suspects for causing fires. They don't seem to be banned.

Now, if you are talking about AA non-rechargeable lithium cells, as some of use use (e.g., for the K100D), then they are subject to the ruling.

Larry in Dallas
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 3:05 PM   #6
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Throwaway lithium batteries work by oxidising lithium metal, which is highly flammable.They therefore represent a fire hazard if misused, damaged or overheated.

Rechargeable 'Lithium' (correctly 'lithium ion)' batteries are not really lithium batteries at all; it's an electrochemical misnomer. They work by changing the oxidation state of cobalt (usually) or manganese oxides or salts, by moving lithium ions around. Lithium ions are small and fast moving; in these batteries they carry the current. They contain no metallic lithium normally, and are therefore less of a hazard.

It is, nevertheless, possible to cause them to 'vent with flame' (manufacturers' euphemism) through incorrect charging or manufacturing faults. They have various safety devices built in.

See Isidor Buchmann's excellent www.batteryuniversity.comfor more information.
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 4:13 PM   #7
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Alan T, I hope your correct , however I saw this press release.

PHMSA 11-07
Friday, December 28, 2007
Contact: Patricia Klinger or Joe Delcambre
Tel.: [img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/cb_transparent_l.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/famfamfam/us.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/arrow.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img][img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/space.gif[/img](202) 366-4831[img]chrome://skype_ff_toolbar_win/content/cb_transparent_r.gif[/img]

New US DOT Hazmat Safety Rule to Place Lithium Battery Limits in Carry-on Baggage on Passenger Aircraft Effective January 1, 2008
Passengers will no longer be able to pack loose lithium batteries in checked luggage beginning January 1, 2008 once new federal safety rules take effect. The new regulation, designed to reduce the risk of lithium battery fires, will continue to allow lithium batteries in checked baggage if they are installed in electronic devices, or in carry-on baggage if stored in plastic bags.
Common consumer electronics such as travel cameras, cell phones, and most laptop computers are still allowed in carry-on and checked luggage. However, the rule limits individuals to bringing only two extended-life spare rechargeable lithium batteries (see attached illustration), such as laptop and professional audio/video/camera equipment lithium batteries in carry-on baggage.
"Doing something as simple as keeping a spare battery in its original retail packaging or a plastic zip-lock bag will prevent unintentional short-circuiting and fires," said Krista Edwards, Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials because they can overheat and ignite in certain conditions. Safety testing conducted by the FAA found that current aircraft cargo fire suppression system would not be capable of suppressing a fire if a shipment of non-rechargeable lithium batteries were ignited in flight.
"This rule protects the passenger," said Lynne Osmus, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) assistant administrator for security and hazardous materials. "It's one more step for safety. It's the right thing to do and the right time to do it."
In addition to the new rule, PHMSA is working with the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the battery and airline industries, airline employee organizations, testing laboratories, and the emergency response communities to increase public awareness about battery-related risks and developments. These useful safety tips are highlighted at the public website: http://safetravel.dot.gov.
###
*Examples of extended-life rechargeable lithium batteries (more than 8 but not more than 25 grams of equivalent lithium content):

Extended-life130 watt-hour "universal" lithium ion battery.





And this table which refers to both Lithium Metal and Lithium Ion batteries.



[align=center]GUIDE TO RULES EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2008[/align] Type Of Battery/Batteries In Checked Baggage In Carry-On Baggage: Lithium Metal Battery, Installed in a Device (up to 2 grams lithium) Permitted [sup]1[/sup] Recommended [sup]1 [/sup] Spare Lithium Metal Battery (Not Installed In a Device) (up to 2 grams lithium) (up to 2 grams lithium)

Forbidden Permitted in carry-on baggage [sup]2[/sup] Lithium Metal Battery, Spare or Installed
(over 2 grams lithium)

Forbidden Forbidden Lithium-Ion Battery Installed in a Device (up to 8 grams lithium equivalent content) Permitted [sup]1[/sup] Recommended [sup]1 [/sup] Spare Lithium-Ion Battery (Not Installed in a Device) (up to 8 grams lithium equivalent content)

Forbidden Permitted in carry-on baggage [sup]2[/sup] "Special Case"
Up to 2 Lithium-Ion Batteries, Spare or Installed (between 8 and 25 grams aggregate lithium equivalent content) Spare Batteries: Forbidden! Installed in Devices: Permitted [sup]1[/sup] Spare Batteries: Permitted [sup]2[/sup] Installed in Devices: Permitted [sup]1[/sup] 1. Although you may carry some devices and installed batteries in checked baggage, carrying them in carry-on baggage, when practicable, is preferred. Whether in checked or carry-on baggage, ensure that devices remain switched off, either by built-in switch/trigger locks, by taping the activation switch in the "off" postion, or by other appropriate measures. 2. Be sure to take protective measures to prevent against short-circuits. See our spare battery tips and how-to pages.
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 4:51 PM   #8
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Crashman wrote:
Quote:
Alan T, I hope your correct , however I saw this press release....
The press release is consistent with what I said. Presumably the notes at the end started out asa table, but as posted here they're fairly incomprehensible. I think they say much the same as Battery University (address above), section BU5 "Is Lithium Ion the Ideal Battery?" It explains there how to work out the "Lithium equivalent" of a lithium ion rechargeable battery.

As I said, the big hazard is disposable lithium batteries, which contain the metal. Carrying several of the AA-size cells or CR-V3s loose, with the terminals exposed and rattling together in a pocket with keys, for example, could in principle cause a disaster through short-circuit.

You could get seriously singed trousers like that even with Ni-NH cells.


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Old Jan 1, 2008, 6:22 PM   #9
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Here's details from the TSA that suggest lithium batteries aren't totally prohibited from checked baggage:

Quote:
Under the new DOT rule, lithium batteries are allowed in checked baggage under one of the following conditions:

- The batteries must be in their original containers.

- The battery terminals must not exposed (for example placing tape over the ends of the batteries).

- The batteries are installed in a device.

- The batteries are enclosed by themselves in a plastic bag.
Source: http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...batteries.shtm


The DoT also specifies quantity limits for lithium content. I don't know about you, but I think these limits are more than enough for photographers' spare batteries:

Quote:
The following quantity limits apply to both your spare and installed batteries. The limits are expressed in grams of “equivalent lithium content.” 8 grams of equivalent lithium content is approximately 100 watt-hours. 25 grams is approximately 300 watt-hours:

- Under the new rules, you can bring batteries with up to 8-gram equivalent lithium content. All lithium ion batteries in cell phones are below 8 gram equivalent lithium content. Nearly all laptop computers also are below this quantity threshold.

- You can also bring up to two spare batteries with an aggregate equivalent lithium content of up to 25 grams, in addition to any batteries that fall below the 8-gram threshold. Examples of two types of lithium ion batteries with equivalent lithium content over 8 grams but below 25 are shown below.

- For a lithium metal battery, whether installed in a device or carried as a spare, the limit on lithium content is 2 grams of lithium metal per battery.

- Almost all consumer-type lithium metal batteries are below 2 grams of lithium metal. But if you are unsure, contact the manufacturer!
Source: http://safetravel.dot.gov/whats_new_batteries.html

- Jason
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 8:58 PM   #10
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Alan

Heres the table in its original form.
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