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Old Dec 31, 2007, 4:37 PM   #11
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Very nice shots Jay. The air and space museumis my favorite from this set.

Tim
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Old Dec 31, 2007, 10:17 PM   #12
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very cool. now i can't decide again 12-24 or 10-17, maybe the answer is both.
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 11:10 AM   #13
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Thank you all for your kind comments! I was apprehensive at first about adding this lens to my collection, but having used it on my travels, I think I will be using it more than I thought. At the short end (10 mm) it can provide a unique perspective; at the 17 mmit functions similar to the kit lens (at 18 mm).

Ishino: I thought about the12-24, but figured there wouldnot be sufficient fish eye at the short end and too much overlap with the kit lens at the long end. Ergo, my choice for the 10-17 mm.

Kjell: The inside of the rotunda dome was taken at the 17mm setting: hand held, pointed up at the center of the dome (I was pleasantly surprised how it turned out).

Scott & Intrstd Obsrvr: I'd be interested in yourexperiences with this lens--I'm looking for other ways to exploit the capabilities without relying too much on de-fishing.

Harriett: If you are into scenic landscapes, the fish eye provides a very wide vista that is quite impressive.

Here are 2 more images that show the versatility of this lens. Nether of the images are defished.

Jay

At 10 mm focal length



and at 17 mm


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Old Jan 1, 2008, 11:11 AM   #14
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wow, that 10mm example is wide! i am loving it!
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 11:49 AM   #15
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Wohohohoho WOW!

Is there no fisheye effect at 17 mm?

Kjell
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 1:10 PM   #16
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Very nice. It does appear the FE perspective is completely gone at 17mm. At what point does it disappear? By chance, do you have any examples around 12 and 15mm?

Tim
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 1:38 PM   #17
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bilybianca wrote:
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Wohohohoho WOW!

Is there no fisheye effect at 17 mm?

Kjell
Kjell: It appears that the fish eye effect at 10 mm is at it's maxium when there is subject mattercloseto the lens. In the example above, the trees on eitherside of the reflecting pool are a distance away and therefore do not appear to be subject to curvature. On the other hand, if you notice the picture 5 in the first series, the columns are close to the lens and therefore exhibit the pronounced curvature. Picture 4 (Wash. monument with flags)shows this condition as well (note the curved horizon). Knowing this characteristic has opened up a whole new perspective for me in using fish-eye lens. Perhaps I've cracked the F/E code:idea:

Tim: I do not have any A/B comparison shots of the same image at various focal lengths. However, as I mentioned above, the curvature effect appears to be directly related to distance of reference points from the camera.

I'd be interested to hear other experiences in using a Fish Eye lens.

Jay
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 1:38 PM   #18
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jelpee wrote:
Quote:
Toured Washington DC last week and tried out this new lens.* Must definitely return to DC--so much to see and do and so much to photograph.* The architecture is stunning and the significance associated with the history and founding of the United States is very compelling.

BTW, I absolutely love this lens. Only down side is that due to the curvature of the lens, it is not possible to use a filter of any kind. Therefore, you have to be very careful to protect the glass. I opted not to de-fish any of these pictures; I think the perpective is unique.


You made some great shots .
I was in DC area for 2 days and I did not even bring my Zenitar 16mm at all. Your 'Dome' has shown the fisheye at its best. Thanks for sharing

Daniel , Toronto
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 2:35 PM   #19
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Hi Jelpee, You have found exactly what I came across with the lens. It is a very different lens from one extreme - wide at 10 to the long end at 17. The curvature at 10 however can be more or less pronounced depending on the subject matter and your composition of the shot. The shot (#7) of the Lincoln Monument in the distance - I would have expected more curvature than actually shown. There is still a bit of mystery there to me, since I have seen (or shot) several landscapes at 10mm that I would have expected some additional bend.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...ntax+da+10-17+

There is a whole series of images using the 10-17 at the Pentax photo site, where the a number of the landscape are relatively square and curvature is minimized at 10mm. So there is a lot of skill and how the image is composed, that is amplified by the Photographer. It is surprising how the photographer can exploit or minimize the Fisheye effects.

As you can see, even at 10mm you can shoot a very suprisingly non curved image. Then again at 17, your very hard pressed to find any curverature.

Its also a very different lens when the subject matter is up close or far away.

And last but not least, is the Photographer's eye, in terms of composing the shot, some have it (such as you), and some are still working on it (me).
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Old Jan 1, 2008, 3:48 PM   #20
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Jelpee you did a great job with the FE. I too have the lens and have a lot of fun with it. Your shots inspired me to post some i had taken several weeks ago.

I am never without the lens as i usualy find i regret it if i decide to leave it at home

Tony
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