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Old Jan 10, 2008, 4:51 PM   #11
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roy it's certainly a decent processor. maybe not the latest and greatest, but it should run most things just fine.
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 5:43 PM   #12
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Roy

This is the device manager screen shot from my dual core PC

Phil
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 6:14 PM   #13
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ishino got it..
i only get 1 on my amd3200 64bit machine

bruder, i have SANDRA but not installed.. this looks like a handy little ap tho. thanks.

ishino, it's a great CPU.. we got this one that's a Dell 3.4ghz and 3 3.2ghz.. all with at least 1/2gig memory, xpPro, keyboards,mice, and 3 18'' dell flatpanels..
i also picked up a 4cpu xeon p3 server with about 10 HDDs in it.. it was a good day..

roy
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 2:02 AM   #14
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In task manager dual cores usually - except for the some very early models - will be labeled dual core. AMD CPU's use a different name. Some Intel Dual Core models will support hyperthreading (I manage a HP server with 4 Xeon dual cores that are hyper threaded -=> 16 processors). Some mother board manufactures have hyper threading being set via the BIOS since some programs/OS's (usually programs) fail when running using hyper threading. Some machines give you a hard time in managing hyper threading via the BIOS - your mileage will vary.

Microsoft counts sockets - not cores - in determining what OS will run on multi socket motherboards. So XP/Vista are limited to dual sockets - so if you have a two dual core motherboard - without hyper threading you could have4 CPU's. If hyper threading is supported - you could have 8. That said = you might not be able to see any benefits. Most "workstation" software is not compiled with dual processors in mind to begin with. It is the OS that comes into play with multi processor systems.

As for picking up a server grade machine (Xeon and lots of drives). XP/Vista will not recognize RAID configurations on drives without specific firmware/drivers from the manufactures. Do not try to set up RAID or partitions using the OS - it is slow and very inefficient -- when it does work - you will not be happy. What you need to do is get the disk controller firmware/system setup disks and define the RAID/partitions before the OS even is thought about. On desktop OS's from MS finding drivers for high end SCSI/iSAS controllers is somewhat of a black art. For HP/Compaq systems it is somewhat doable (that is what we use at work) but for guys like Dell - It is a real pain - you really have to be dedicated to get anything out of those guys. (I put XP on a Dell server - took me 5 hours of hard work to just find a driver that would allow XP Pro to see a RAID 1 set of 72 GB SCSI hard drives.)

For machines with Xeon's and RAID - put some sort of Server OS on it - either a flavor of MS (there are 4 flavors of Windows server 2003) or Linux.

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Old Jan 11, 2008, 2:55 AM   #15
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PDL,
you hit the nail on the head!!
from talking to a former head of R&D at agilent i was informed of the same about the server.. he'll probably end up with this as he has the know how and os for it..
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 8:57 AM   #16
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A number of years ago, 5 or 6 - Intel came out with technology, that while not dual core, reported itself as multiple cores. Right at this moment, I can not remember what they called it. However, I know that it was on there Xeon server processors, and I think made its way down to the Pentiums. I think it was called hyperstep, hyper thread or hyper - something.

Dual cores have become very common, even in the low end today. My company does not the top of the line for the desk top (lab yes), and the new laptop I just picked up last week at work was a dual core. So they are just about everywhere, even at the low end.
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 5:31 PM   #17
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That's a great machine you got there roy! With enough RAM in there (definitely more than 1GB) that's a very fast workstation!

It's dual core. Not cheap stuff you got there at 3 Ghz/core

Tom
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 7:23 PM   #18
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Where is gets confusing, my MacBook is a core 2 duo, which is a dual core in one chip, but my Mac Pro is a quad core, but shows 2 3GHz dual core processors.

I expect the new PC's are the same.

Tom
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 9:11 PM   #19
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this is not a dual core but for a freebee we'll keep it. tom, i was down at a printers place the other day and they had one of the new macs.. i was very impressed.. i'd go mac but you can't BIY.. these machines here are the 1st company made machines in here for a number of years..

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Old Jan 11, 2008, 10:25 PM   #20
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Hi Robar,

I had some time to look it up. What you have is a Pentium 4 with HyperThreading.

http://www.intel.com/technology/plat...+tabs_overview

Here is Intel's description...
Enterprise, e-Business, and gaming software applications continue to put higher demands on processors. To improve performance in the past, threading was enabled in the software by splitting instructions into multiple streams so that multiple processors could act upon them. Hyper-Threading Technology (HT Technology)¹ provides thread-level parallelism on each processor, resulting in more efficient use of processor resources, higher processing throughput, and improved performance on today's multithreaded software. The combination of an Intel® processor and chipset that support HT Technology, an operating system that includes optimizations for HT Technology, and a BIOS that supports HT Technology and has it enabled, delivers increased system performance and responsiveness.

Here is Intel's overview of the processor description.

http://www.intel.com/products/proces...ucts+body_p4ht

Here is an explaination of how it works

http://www.digit-life.com/articles/p...yperthreading/

Here is another link explaining what is going on...

http://www.intel.com/support/process.../cs-017371.htm
Verifying Hyper-Threading Technology using Windows XP's Task Manager
Hyper-Threading Technology is enabled if there are two CPU usage history graphs within Windows XP Task Manager. If only one CPU graph is displayed and Hyper-Threading Technology is enabled in the BIOS settings, then make sure Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 1 (or higher) is properly installed. Only one CPU history graph will be displayed in Task Manager if Hyper-Threading Technology is disabled in the BIOS settings.

Follow these steps, to verify Hyper-Threading Technology is enabled in Windows XP Task Manager:
  1. Right click Task Bar [/*]
  2. Click Task Manager [/*]
  3. Click the Performance tab [/*]

Figure 5. Verifying Hyper-Threading Technology in Windows* XP Task Manager

Verifying Hyper-Threading Technology in Windows* XP Task Manager
Hyper-Threading Technology is enabled if there are two processor listed in Windows XP Task Manager. Only one processor driver will be installed if Hyper-Threading Technology is disabled in the BIOS settings. Note: It is important to have the latest INF utility in order to optimize platform performance with Intel Pentium 4 processor-based systems using Microsoft Windows XP.
Follow these steps, to verify Hyper-Threading Technology is enabled in Windows XP Device Manager:
  1. Click Start Menu [/*]
  2. Click Control Panel [/*]
  3. Double click System [/*]
  4. Click the Hardware tab [/*]
  5. Click Device Manager [/*]
  6. Double click Processors [/*]

Figure 6. Verifying Hyper-Threading Technology in Windows* XP Device Manager
Essentially they are very good machines. We used them on one project about 6 years ago. One user station had a set of two processor chips - P4HT where each reported dual cores (multiple streams), with 4G of Memory and 72GB of 15,000 RPM SCSI320 disks, each with a graphic board with 2 graphic processors and 1GB of dual ported memory. The workstations were connected to 2 - 8 processor Xeon servers running 32GB of memory each, with 4TB of storage, all connected with dual GB Ethernet connections. The customer though the system was a bit slow, so we had to optimize various sections of the software.

The hardware has been recently upgraded I understand - workstations 2 - 4 core AMD with 16GB of memory - with the disk storage replaced with solid state disks, the servers are running 8 - 4 core processors with 64GB memory all interconnected with dual 10G Ethernet, all using PCIe - which makes a very large difference. They now have the performance they wanted all along.

Enjoy!
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