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Old Feb 17, 2008, 2:54 PM   #11
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Hi Ira,

I have always shot like i was still using film. My biggest mem card is 1gb and that gives me 72 shot using Raw. If I use Tiff i get only about 54 shots.

I have never used all of the space on my mem cardwhen I go out. Today and yesterday I was shooting the Iron Mountain Continental Cup International Ski Jumping. Out of 72 Raw shots I had 49 left on the card.

I have always tried to see the shot in my head before I press the shutter.

As for LBA, Yes I have it but can't afford it!!!! LOL !!! So I shoot with the lenses that I have for my istD (all four of them)...:G But that gives me the range of 18mm to 300mm.

If and when I feel the urge to shoot B&W I can always drag out my film SLR and three lenses, All Prime (28,50,135 and a 2x teleconverter).

So I guess what I am trying to say is you don't need a tripod or a lot of fancy lenses to get the shot. It takes seeing what you want to shoot, Find it in the viewfinder and then press the shutter. You will surprise yourself to find you got the shot in ONE TAKE. Besides you get alot of exercise walking around to find the shot you want to take...:O

Rudy
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Old Feb 17, 2008, 3:13 PM   #12
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A very good and interesting post. It shows me everybody has THEIR method that works best for them.

98% of my shots are of wild free ranging animals and birds and because of the places I go a Tripod or a Monopod just don't work cuz you miss to many opportunities. Try getting off a horse and set up a Monopod or Tripod for a elk sneaking thru the trees. You have maybey 2 seconds to get the photo as he goes in between trees. This is why I have found for my style of photography BURST mode is my best weapon. My 2nd best weapon is a BushHawk.

My last outing at Bosque Del Apache I filled a 8 GB card every morning and every evening.

A pretty well know photographer came up to my place for a 4 day elk hunt and we had a lot of time to visit and much of what I am reading here is what he had to say when he first got here. At the end of the hunt he said now at his classes he is going to also explain the exceptions to the standard rules.


Wacky roger
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Old Feb 17, 2008, 3:32 PM   #13
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Bruce, nice shot.

Glenn, I'll check it out.

Th, I realize the limitation of this lens, I could have used the more versatile 35mm f2 but I used prime lenses for many years, for about 15 years the only lenses I owned were a 50mm f1.7, a 28mm f2.8, a 135mm f2.8 and a 70-150mm f3.8 zoom.

Rudy, you are familiar with the "old ways"

Roger, your's is a very different situation with an appropriate solution (for lots of great shots). Keep it up.

Ira
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Old Feb 17, 2008, 3:35 PM   #14
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I agree that this has been an interesting thread. If it were not for digital I would never have become interested in photography, the cost of the consumables, developing, and printing would have precluded the necessary practice (in other words, I am cheap!).

I still tend to work primarily in jpeg mode and I shoot lots of images of the same subject, only varying the settings on the camera. I find this to be very educational as I review my shots later and see what worked best and what did not work at all. I have done as Ira suggests and limited myself to one lens on an outing but I don't think I could bring myself to limit myself to only one small memory card. I know that I have taken over 1100 shots in a single day;though I deleted 2/3rds on the first culling.

I have realized that you never really "arrive" in this hobby, you just keep revealing how much more of the road you still have to travel.

Tim
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Old Feb 17, 2008, 3:39 PM   #15
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Tim

I would not consider limiting myself to one memory card, just one good lens. Your practice of shooting the same subject in different ways is an excellent approach.

Ira
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Old Feb 18, 2008, 7:11 PM   #16
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A very timely topic, Ira. I, too, had been doing a lot of thinking lately about how I can improve on my shots. Not necessarily on getting different equipment (although, I did just get a new lens), but on "focusing" on what I'm doing when I do photograph something. My husband always says, "oh, well, you can fix it in PS". I want to be able to take that photo that doesn't require a lot of fixing.

My brother was just here this weekend and I realized we had a lot in common photography wise. It was nice as most times I go out with others I feel like I'm being a pain asking them to stop the car to get a shot of something. Or, wondering why I'm photographing a particular thing. We found that we were both wanting to stop and get the same things. Although, he could manage to get some decent shots while the car was moving. He has a Sony DSH5 (?)

It's been so cold this winter I've been finding myself hopping out of the car and quickly shooting something hoping to be able to crop or fix settings later. But, had been reading "Digital Photography in Available Light" by Mark Galer. I had thought it was going to be all about working without flash, but it is really making me think my imaging process. Like others have said here, to stop and look before pressing the shutter.

Guess I've gotten a little off topic here, but wanted to thank you for posting this. I'd been thinking on trying to just focus on a particular type of photo to master it, and then on to something else.

Patty
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Old Feb 18, 2008, 9:04 PM   #17
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Monza76 wrote:
Quote:
Winter is a rather dead period for me in photography,¬* I am on the provincial drama festival host committee,¬* I am playing Mayhew in the local¬*production of "Witness for the Prosecution" (for the same festival),¬* I¬*am on the¬*the Town of Gander 50th anniversary committee,¬*and I still have a job that requires quite a bit of time (teaching).¬* By the end of March life will return to normal but for now I find only enough time to shoot things around the house (which explains so many back window shots).

I am posting this because I was wondering if there were any others in a similar situation,¬* not quite satisfied with your present photography and realizing that lenses and cameras are not going to improve that.¬* Back to basics for me.

Anyone have any similar stories to tell?

Ira

Keep It Simple, Stupid!

BTW:¬*¬* I like the fact that the small lens on the chrome DL makes for a package that attracts very little attention,¬* candid photography is a little less difficult.¬* The Lowepro bag actually gets more attention than the camera.¬* If I show up with the black DS and the Sigma 24-135mm (even though the DS is not a particularly large camera) it seems that everyone sees you as some sort of a professional while the equally capable chrome DL with the excellent FA 50mm f1.4 is dismissed as amateur (often mistaken for a 35mm film camera like those that we all owned in the last 1970s, early 1980s).¬*¬*
Ira,

Like you I always take as few lens/equipments as possibled for the job I am about to shoot. Typically I will leave majority of my gears (mainly prime lenses 16-28-50-100-135 &300mm) in my car and take out one or two lens out for the job. One DL/K100D with small lens in my windbreaker pocket and an extra lens (either 135mm or 300mm) in the other pocket.
I hate large hoods especially the newer type of petal shaped huge hoods.
This winter is particularly atrocious weather-wise and that cut short my exciting quest to master the BIF shoots with my A300mm. I wish I have longer reach though.
Tried some indoor studio type of portrait/model shots this winter time. I have trouble communicating to the models as to how I want the shots to be made - quite a bit of generation and taste gap indeed. But it was fun.
I am to have a break in late March flying back to the Far East on a short trip. Hope to get some passable wildlife shots there.
I have a small fast zoom - a Sigma 24-60mm F2.8 and I have ordered a huge Tamron 70-200mm F2.8 which is something you call professional looking gear. I will probably use it alternatively with my daughter who has got a K100D Super and who may go for the zoom route (rather than zooming with her feet). Trouble is she is 9 hours drive away.
If you ask me if that is a conscious effect to improve, I would say I am currently brain dead or hibernating.

Daniel
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Old Feb 19, 2008, 5:18 PM   #18
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Daniel

I have always been impressed by your approach to photography, whenever you take on a new challenge you practice toward a degree of mastery. The 135mm f2.8 resulted in lots of informal portraits, the A* 300mm resulted in some excellent bird photography (proving that fast AF is not the most important factor in this area). You don't buy lenses to have them lie around, it seems your first question must be "Now how can I use this lens to its best capability?"

I like the term amateur because it implies a love of the medium, professional implies a job, not necessarily a better photographer. My current quest is to face things more like you have been, pick your favourite tools and learn how to use them right. For me that now means the FA 50mm f1.4 and my other current favourite, the F 100-300mm f3.5-5.6 zoom. Over the next few months I hope to set myself some realistic goals to improve.

Thanks

Ira
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Old Feb 26, 2008, 4:29 PM   #19
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Well, I am into week two of my re-evaluation. I have switched from the 50mm to the FA 35mm f2.0 for its more natural perspective. I can still get some great DOF effects such as goldwing85's dog, shot last night with the FA35.



Ira

BTW I am down to the little Lowepro TLZ Mini bag, it is all I need with this little package.

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Old Feb 26, 2008, 6:17 PM   #20
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Ira, sorry to be late to the post, but I have always been pretty much a one lens person and that remains so, even with the dreary weather and bone chilling cold. I like your approach to the issue, not only using one lens, but using one small enough to make the kit very portable, thus less likely to be left behind.

I have always felt that by limiting my lens choices, I then have to take the time to make what I have with me take be best photo possible from my perspective.

Tom
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