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Old Mar 2, 2008, 10:23 PM   #1
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Penolta - Please ?? Mange ??

Here are a couple of photos of last years elk calves. There is something wrong with the calve in photo #1 I think it should be looking like the calve in photo #2

I am guessing its mange ??? will it go away ??? can the other elk get it from this calve ???

I tried looking it up on the internet but couldn't figure it out.

Thanks in advance.

The sick one ???




Happy and healthy looking




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Old Mar 3, 2008, 12:01 AM   #2
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That looks like a really bad case of mange, I do believe the others could contract it from him, but I am not a vetrenarian. As for will he get better, he will probably fall victim to a predator, survival of the fittess.
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Old Mar 3, 2008, 9:40 AM   #3
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there's 2 kinds of mange. demodectic and psoroptic(sarcoptic)...this doesn't look like a bad case of demo --yet.. mainly with demo mange it's a problem with the immune system of the animal. you can't get demo mange from an animal .. all i know is about dogs with it. ALL!! dogs have it.. when their immune system gets low the mite goes active and the body can't fight it off because of it's low immune system response.. if this is demo mange, will it die of it?? without treatment--yes...

psoroptic mange is a WHOLE different story. you can get it from a dog.. it's also called scabbies.. you'll scratch yourself to death, just kidding.. this one scares us to death because you can't tell the difference until it's too late. never had it tho..

here's a shot of a ''free bleeder'' meaning she's just drips blood.. when she left us, she was a beautiful little girl.. would she have died without treatment-- 100% for sure..
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Old Mar 3, 2008, 11:12 AM   #4
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2many wrote:
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That looks like a really bad case of mange, I do believe the others could contract it from him, but I am not a vetrenarian. As for will he get better, he will probably fall victim to a predator, survival of the fittess.
Mange was my guess but I just don't know anything about it.



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Old Mar 3, 2008, 11:19 AM   #5
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you got me interested http://instruction.cvhs.okstate.edu/...33/deerpar.htm

from what i've been reading there are several mange variations for deer. it looks like the most common is sarcoptic.. you do not want to get around any animal with sarcoptic mange. it's very easy to contract and very difficult to get rid of. our vet had a case once and it makes me itch just thinking of it.


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Old Mar 3, 2008, 11:25 AM   #6
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robar wrote:
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you got me interested http://instruction.cvhs.okstate.edu/...33/deerpar.htm

from what i've been reading there are several mange variations for deer. it looks like the most common is sarcoptic.. you do not want to get around any animal with sarcoptic mange. it's very easy to contract and very difficult to get rid of. our vet had a case once and it makes me itch just thinking of it.

Robar, I just finished reading both of your posts. Thank you very much for the information and the link was a interesting read as well. As far as I could tell this was the only elk in a small herd of about 30 that had this problem.



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Old Mar 3, 2008, 1:45 PM   #7
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Not being a veterinarian, I wouldn't attempt a diagnosis from a photograph as there are probably other conditions that could cause hair loss, but it certainly looks mangy. I have had some training in parasitology, however, and in reference to some of the above comments about two of the mange-causing organisms, humans can host both Sarcoptes scabei and Demodex folliculorum (both are mites). Sarcoptes causes scabies in humans, but Demodex lives on all of us, down in hair follicles (most commonly eyelashes), without causing disease - we call it a commensal on humans, while Sarcoptes is a parasite. Ectoparasites are often less host specific than endoparasites, and can cross to other hosts; any parasite that is well adapted to one host may cause little or no disease (it is self defeating to kill one's own host), but in another with which it has been associated with over less time, or only accidentally, it can cause moderate or severe disease if it survives at all. The demodectic orgnism listed onRoy's deer parasite site has the same name as the human organism, which means that it looks identical - if it is not physiologically different (and therefore a strain specific to deer), it could be / have been transferred from humans as a pathogen (I do not know offhand whichactually might bethe case, if either).
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Old Mar 3, 2008, 2:52 PM   #8
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penolta wrote:
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Not being a veterinarian, I wouldn't attempt a diagnosis from a photograph as there are probably other conditions that could cause hair loss, but it certainly looks mangy. I have had some training in parasitology, however, and in reference to some of the above comments about two of the mange-causing organisms, humans can host both Sarcoptes scabei and Demodex folliculorum (both are mites). Sarcoptes causes scabies in humans, but Demodex lives on all of us, down in hair follicles (most commonly eyelashes), without causing disease - we call it a commensal on humans, while Sarcoptes is a parasite. Ectoparasites are often less host specific than endoparasites, and can cross to other hosts; any parasite that is well adapted to one host may cause little or no disease (it is self defeating to kill one's own host), but in another with which it has been associated with over less time, or only accidentally, it can cause moderate or severe disease if it survives at all. The demodectic orgnism listed onRoy's deer parasite site has the same name as the human organism, which means that it looks identical - if it is not physiologically different (and therefore a strain specific to deer), it could be / have been transferred from humans as a pathogen (I do not know offhand whichactually might bethe case, if either).
Thanks Penolta, now thanks to you and Roy I know a little something I didn't know anything about.


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Old Mar 3, 2008, 5:16 PM   #9
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i know i stated that you can't get demo.. what i meant was that it has no effect in humans. P is correct..
i've seen so many cases of red mange it makes me ill. it usually takes months to get it under control..
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Old Jan 27, 2012, 11:55 AM   #10
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The usual treatment for Sarcoptic mange is a drug called Ivermectin. It is an injection given weekly for up to 4 weeks. Most pets decrease their scratching rapidly after the first injection. Some dogs, particularly Collies, Shetland Sheepdogs, and Old English Sheepdogs do not tolerate the medication well. In these pets we use a dip called Lyme Sulfur that is also very effective. The disadvantage to the dip is the odor it causes and the staining of white coated animals. all pets in a household should be treated regardless of whether they are showing symptoms or not. Pets that have secondary skin infections from the trauma might also be put on antibiotics.
I hope this helps if you havent found treatment yet or have this again
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