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Old Mar 26, 2008, 9:31 PM   #21
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This is an interesting thread, and I've learned a couple of things from it. There doesn't seem to be any "rules" for taking good pictures of flowers - just feeling. I had been forgetting something I wrote a couple of years ago: I'll never be a pro because the only decent pictures I take are ones where I'm emotionally involved with my subject. If I'm bored with something I won't be happy with my pictures and I've been feeling bored with the botanical gardens. It's time to try something else for a while and leave the flowers alone (unless the local wildflowers come out with a good display).

My husband, who was reading over my shoulder, corrected me. There is a "rule" for taking flower pictures - make sure the sprinklers are off!
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Old Mar 26, 2008, 10:01 PM   #22
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Taking shots of flowers that others will show some interest in can be difficult. I like using non-traditional lighting, but that is for me, not others. Unfortunately, Ialso prefer the colors and contrast to be close to natural. The judges of the photo contest I entered last, seem to prefer what I consider vastly overprocessed photos. The winning entries had highly saturated color and were much sharper than anything in nature.

It is always interesting to see what others prefer, but I have my own preferences and continue my own style.

brian
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 5:43 AM   #23
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mtngal wrote:
Quote:
This is an interesting thread, and I've learned a couple of things from it. There doesn't seem to be any "rules" for taking good pictures of flowers - just feeling. I had been forgetting something I wrote a couple of years ago: I'll never be a pro because the only decent pictures I take are ones where I'm emotionally involved with my subject. If I'm bored with something I won't be happy with my pictures and I've been feeling bored with the botanical gardens. It's time to try something else for a while and leave the flowers alone (unless the local wildflowers come out with a good display).

My husband, who was reading over my shoulder, corrected me. There is a "rule" for taking flower pictures - make sure the sprinklers are off!
I know what you mean about being bored with the subject matter. For a while I was trying very hard to get some good pictures of birds, because they were the only "available" wildlife. I finally gave up because it was no longer interesting and the sense of challenge to get the great shot was gone as well. As for lenses and flowers, I do own a 1:2 macro lens and an extension tube but I still end up using my non-macro long zooms for most of my attempts at floral imagery because it will get me close enough for larger blooms and it is somewhat more forgiving of minor errors.

BTW don't you have a K10D and a DA* lens? Why bother with the sprinklers?

Ira
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 7:51 AM   #24
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Monza76 wrote:
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BTW don't you have a K10D and a DA* lens? Why bother with the sprinklers?

Ira
LOL! It's not the camera equipment that might be damaged by the sprinklers, its that the person behind the camera might melt...
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 8:43 AM   #25
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Harriet,



Did you have a chance to look through the other threads I had links for?



There was some good info in both of them.



Ed
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 12:15 PM   #26
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I am quite in the same thoughts as Ira is.. The nice angle and controlled DOF.. and a light, of course.. I am using my DA 50-200mm lens mostly.. but now and then I am trying also my 18-55 lens too.. as for my fresia shot today.. posted in another thread in forum..

Irena
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 2:21 PM   #27
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For me it depends on the kind of flower, the background available and what you want to tell in your photo that made you want to do the photograph. Do you want to have the entire flower in focus, just part of the flower, the flower and the plant, or everything including background. What do you want out of focus so it does not distract from the vision. When you decide what you want you can experiment with aperture, focal length and other technical aspects that control these areas.

Ed

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Old Mar 27, 2008, 2:59 PM   #28
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It was yesterday evening, I was in my kitchen and the evening sun was shining through a window. Fora very short time, maybe 2 minutes or so, a vase with dried flowers was illuminated. I never noticed that before and quickly grabbing my camera I tried to capture that special moment - this is what it looked like:

#1 - portrait style with vase



#2 - landscape style



I like #2 very much,although both pictures show something special about those dried flowers, the special warm feeling, the glowing yellow blossom lit by the evening sun. One can argue about DOF, colors, composition and stuff... for me that moment counts.

What do you say?

(Taken with DL2 and K 135/2.5 at ISO 800 - no other light than the few rays of the evening sun)
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Old Mar 27, 2008, 4:11 PM   #29
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I've seen it as either color (of course) or contrast makes up a good flower photo. How does what youre shooting stand out or be part of its surroundings. I've seen people get so caught up in ONLY color that youre main flower gets caught up in some kinda Technicolor madness!!!
Mtngal's first picture shows a great example of contrast. Both in tone and how its seperated from the background.

Mind if I donate one to the cause?



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Old Mar 27, 2008, 9:53 PM   #30
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Yes - I need to finish reading through one of them. There's some lovely examples posted. They gave me some new ideas to try next time I want to shoot flowers. However, I think I'm right to try something new for a while and take a break from flowers in general.
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