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Old Jun 3, 2008, 10:50 AM   #1
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I'm not a flash user but 'dug out' quite an old flash unit that I used with a Pentax K2 many years ago - it was simple then, set the shutter speed to 1/125 & aperture to the figure determined by the distance setting on the flash unit.

Reading through the user manual, there was nothing included for anything other than bespoke Pentax units.

Tried a few things i.e. Av, B mode with limited to nil success, but then decided to use M mode. Set the shutter speed to 1/90 & aperture to f8 (value determined by flash unit) & it works fine. It didn't appear to matter what shutter speed was used as long as it was slower than 1/180 - obviously it is reduced to something very slow, then normal light would also influence the exposure.

No doubt, this has been discussed before.
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Old Jun 3, 2008, 11:39 AM   #2
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The K10D along with the other DSLRs from Pentax require P-TTL flashes in order to work in the auto modes. If you have an older flash, your best option is to do what you have done: i.e. set the shutter speed to less than 1/180 sec and the aperture to the distance chart on the flash. A word of caution though: I have heard of risks to modern day DSLR's from using older flash units--something about the higher trigger voltage which could fry the circuits of today's cameras.

Hope this helps!

Jay
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Old Jun 3, 2008, 11:57 AM   #3
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jelpee wrote:
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A word of caution though: I have heard of risks to modern day DSLR's from using older flash units--something about the higher trigger voltage which could fry the circuits of today's cameras.
I would have thought that the interface between the dSRL & the flash unit is a low level affair amd would not in itself constitute a problem.

The flash tube inside the flash unit will require a high voltage in order to trigger this - that could generate some radiated interferance but I doubt that it would harm anything.

Worth checking out though.
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Old Jun 3, 2008, 12:00 PM   #4
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*istD and *istDS works with the "old" TTL flash metering system, and with P-TTL as well. A very big advantage to newer models. From K100D and upwards it's P-TTL only. Your flash though, is to old to support either system, so it's nice how you have learnt to master it in fully manual mode.

Kjell
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Old Jun 3, 2008, 1:28 PM   #5
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IntrepidWalker wrote:
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jelpee wrote:
Quote:
A word of caution though:* I have heard of risks to modern day DSLR's from using older flash units--something about the higher trigger voltage which could fry the circuits of today's cameras.
I would have thought that the interface between the dSRL & the flash unit is a low level affair amd would not in itself constitute a problem.

The flash tube inside the flash unit will require a high voltage in order to trigger this - that could generate some radiated interferance but I doubt that it would harm anything.

Worth checking out though.
Hi IW,

Jay is correct about the trigger voltage in the flash. Before proceeding, it would be a good idea to check this. The most cited resource is a trigger voltage chart posted by a C P&S user some time ago at:

http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

Quite a few models are listed, but if yours isn't, there are instructions on how to measure yours if you have a VOM (if you don't have one, you could try taking your flash to a Radio Shack or similar electronics store -- they might be willing to test it for you.

A few of the older flash units used trigger voltages up to 250V, many use @ 30V, and 10-12 V is pretty common. The *ist D series cameras have been reported to be good for up to 30V (there is some confusion about this from information from different regional Pentax Tech Centers) It's generally accepted that the K series camera are safer with 6V or less.

Don't be fooled by thinking that since you've already used it, that it's safe. I've heard that the damage can be cumulative, with the camera working fine -- until it doesn't anymore. . . much better to check it and be safe rather than sorry.

Scott
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Old Jun 3, 2008, 5:52 PM   #6
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Thanks for the feedback - my flash wasn't there but followed their instructions.

Perhaps it's as well to be a tad bit cautious and not use it.
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