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Old Jun 11, 2008, 7:53 PM   #1
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I continued with my lunch time shoots of North Buffalo Today.

First Stop was the Buffalo Psychiatric Center. The H.H. Richardson Complex is also called the State Insane Asylum, State Lunatic Asylum and the Buffalo State Hospital. In 1870 H. H. Richardson, was chosen as architect; for the new mental hospital. Groundbreaking ceremonies took place in June 1871, and by 1880 the first patients were received in the complex. Construction was completed by 1895. The facility was closed in 1974.

This place always made me feel a little paranoid, it gives me the willies.








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Old Jun 11, 2008, 7:58 PM   #2
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Next stop was just around the corner, a much more pleasant environment. Delaware Park, an Olmsted Park on the site of the 1901 Pan American Exposition.

Albright-Knox Art gallery:Construction of the Albright Art Gallery, a generous gift from Buffalo entrepreneur and philanthropist John J. Albright. Intended to serve first as the Fine Arts Pavilion of the Pan-American Exposition in 1901, it was completed too late for that purpose in 1905. The original building was designed by Edward B. Green, the distinguished Buffalo architect also responsible for the design of the Toledo Museum of Art and the Dayton Art Institute. Later, the Gallery was significantly enhanced with the addition of a new wing designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill of New York. Made possible with major donations from Seymour H. Knox, Jr. and his family, and hundreds of other contributors, the new addition was dedicated in 1962, and the museum was renamed the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.






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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:05 PM   #3
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Nice, a200user. I like the second shots of both. Guess I'm more into details of things. The Asylum building looks quite impressive with the stones and designs in the buildings.

I do like the symmetry in the third shot. Could you have gotten a little more of the stairs (or is it a fountain) leading up to it and less sky? Or, is it one of those where it's just boring up front?

Patty
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:10 PM   #4
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Looking North from the art gallery you will find the Buffalo History Museum.

This building, designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987, is the only permanent building erected for the 1901 Pan-American Exposition and in fact is the only building left from the expo.

Buffalo architect George Cary (1859-1945), who had been classically trained in Paris, designed the building, faced and corniced with Vermont marble, in Doric style. The beautiful south portico, overlooking Hoyt Lake in Delaware Park, is a scaled-down version of the east front of the Parthenon, in Athens.

After the Exposition closed, the building became the headquarters of the Buffalo Historical Society in 1902.






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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:17 PM   #5
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nhmom wrote:
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I do like the symmetry in the third shot. Could you have gotten a little more of the stairs (or is it a fountain) leading up to it and less sky? Or, is it one of those where it's just boring up front?

Patty
It's boring with more of the foreground. The stairs stop atbottom ofthe photo, and then becomes a wide asphalt drop off area which is part of Lincoln Parkway. I was having trouble keeping parked vehicles and passing cars out of the shot. The ambulance to the left was unavoidable. Actually theseshots aretaken from the back ofthe gallery.I hope to getsome of the front the next time I'm over that way.

Jim
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:23 PM   #6
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The lake shown in the last photo is Hoyt Lake. The Marcy Casino is on this lake just east of the art gallery.

The original structure, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted's partner Calvert Vaux in 1874, served as a boathouse located at the western end of the lake. In 1885, the boathouse was enlarged due to its popularity, but sadly was destroyed by a fire in 1900.

The structure was rebuilt in time for the 1901 Pan-American Exposition that took place throughout Delaware Park. The new 3-story building, designed by Buffalo architect E.B. Green, officially became known as the Delaware Park Casino and served as a popular gathering place on Hoyt Lake until 1960.

The expanding city and move toward modernization led to the total renovation of the Casino in 1961, removing any trace of E.B. Green's design. In 1990, the Casino was "restored" to a style that reflected Olmsted, Vaux, and Green's simpler designs.





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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:26 PM   #7
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Behind the Marcy Casino is the "Rose Garden". A popular stop for wedding photographers.






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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:28 PM   #8
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a200user wrote:
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It's boring with more of the foreground. The stairs stop atbottom ofthe photo, and then becomes a wide asphalt drop off area which is part of Lincoln Parkway. I was having trouble keeping parked vehicles and passing cars out of the shot. The ambulance to the left was unavoidable. Actually theseshots aretaken from the back ofthe gallery.I hope to getsome of the front the next time I'm over that way.

Jim
Hi Jim,

That's what I suspected. Darn those cars and people getting in the way. I kept trying to get shots of the beach this weekend with no people in it. Finally gave up and just shot. Sometimes it's just unavoidable.:sad:

I meant to say thanks for the lesson on each building you are posting. Much more interesting that way to know the history of each.

Patty
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:36 PM   #9
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A few more miscellaneous shots in around Delaware Park:

Hoyt Lake: Looking South East towards Forest Lawn Cemetery.



A stately home on Lincoln Parkway just South of the Art Gallery:



On my next lunch time shoot I hope to get the Darwin Martin House - designed by Frank Loyd Wright.
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 9:32 PM   #10
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Thanks for letting us see a side of Buffalo that I never knew existed, and some history, too. These are really neat pictures.

What are the mental hospital buildings used for now? They are beautiful (I like the second picture better because it accentuates the interesting towers).
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