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Old Nov 6, 2008, 4:32 PM   #11
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Tips for hand holding, for beginners (mostly): Most people naturally concentrate on what their camera is shooting at and don't think enough about what it is shooting from.

How you hold your camera is crucial to sharpness since it determines how steady you are. Bracing the camera to reduce movement requires that everything connected to it is secured - from fingers to elbows to toes. Grip it with all ten fingers - with your right hand (if it is big enough) grasp the grip with only your two middle fingers, the thumb behind on the thumb rest. Place the little finger UNDER the body, and the index finger FLAT on the top corner (not arched above it) and roll it down on the shutter release as you shoot, rather that stabbing the release with the finget tip). And brace it against the forehead as you sight through the viewfinder (unless you wear glasses). Cradle the lens with your left hand (even if the lens is a short one), the thumb alongside the lens and the heel of the hand beneath the left corner of the body (unless the lens is very long) - do not unbalance the camera by gripping both ends of the body, which will allow the weight of the lens to tend to tip downwards. All of this is automatic for most people, but not for all.

Size your camera strap so it fits snugly around your right elbow. Keep your elbows tight against your body, which keeps the camera level and further steadies it, and spread your feet apart to steady yourself - you are a bipod, 2/3 of the way to a tripod, so brace against a tree, wall, or railing if one is convenient, to make yourself into a tripod. And if you are shooting a moving subject, try to follow it briefly in the viewfinder before shooting to add panning smoothnes to your own movement and reduce self-induced motion blur - for instance, if you see a bird approaching that you mmight want, don't wait until it is close enough to shoot, pick it up in the viewfinder and follow it in. Position yourself such that you can swivel at the waist as you follow and do not have to shift your feet, which will unbalance you.
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 4:55 PM   #12
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Trojansoc wrote:
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Tip: It sounds so simple, but I would wager that every shooter on this forum has done it at least once, resulting in degraded photos. Take 30 seconds when you pick up your camera, hit the Fn button and check your White Balance, ISO, and shutter mode. It's so easy to use a custom setting for a special setting, set your camera down when you get to the computer, then pick it up and start shooting, assuming your on your "normal" setting.
I couldn't agree with you more!

I can't tell you how many "blue" pictures I've taken by leaving the White Balance on Tungsten (Incandescent) after shooting indoors without flash, and then forgetting to change it back.
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 5:17 PM   #13
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Tip:

I mentioned in another thread that I had discovered, somewhat by accident, that you can change the ISOSensitivity steps to 1/2 or 1/3 steps on the K10D. In looking this up in the manual, I feel that it's not explained very well. The topic is touched upon on page 33 under the Custom Settings Menu options, page 140 under the ISO options and page 162 under EV options.

Under the ISO options, all it states is that you can "lock the ISO senstivity adjustment to increments of 1 EV or to coordintate it with the EV Steps in the Custom Setting menu", which is a little vague. What this is really saying is that the ISO sensitivity steps cannot be altered independently, but can be tied to the EV steps. The default is 1 EV.

I posted full instructions (with pictures!) at:
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=589901&forum_id=80
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 8:13 PM   #14
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snostorm wrote:
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Hi Glen,

My 3 favorite gadgets are the Pentax F 1.7x AFA which give me a whole lot of AF options for my tele lenses, and has literally saved me thousands of $$s in lens costs, the Joe Demb Flipit with Diffuser which is, IMO the most versatile flash modifier on the market, and the Camdapter grip strap, which is easily the nicest of this type of grip.


Scott
do you use the battery grip with the camdapter grip strap



Dave
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 8:59 PM   #15
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i agree with everything posted here..
everything boils down to 1 thing IMHO.......

PATIENCE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

take your time.... oh?? don't let the delete keyget inyour way(no one knows except you)

roy
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 9:41 PM   #16
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Gadget: Shutter cable release that you can lock the shutter open for longer then 30 seconds.

Technique: Take a photo just after the sun sets when the sky looks almost dark. If you lock open the shutter and take a photo for 30 seconds to 3 minutes there can still be some color in the sky. You can blur clouds and smooth out reflections of lights on water.

Words of wisdom: Take the photo you can then wait for the photo you want. Then wait and take one more. It is amazing how often the first photo is the only photo or that the last photo is the best photo.

DAZ
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Old Nov 6, 2008, 10:08 PM   #17
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dafiryde wrote:
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do you use the battery grip with the camdapter grip strap?
Hi Dave,

You can use the Camdapter with the battery grip -- it fits pretty well without any adjustment because the tripod attachment point is offset to the shutter release side on the battery grip. It only helps when holding the camera in landscape orientation though. It kind of gets in the way when using the vertical grip, so I usually remove the Camdapter altogether and use a neck strap. I only really use the battery grip when shooting and event -- 99+ percent of the time, I don't have it mounted.

Scott

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Old Nov 7, 2008, 12:09 AM   #18
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A wonderful idea for a thread.....

Everything posted here I agree with and have suffered from - many times over.

Lack of practice, bad technique, leaving the camera set to some special setup and not checking it on the next use, etc. Its all true! and can't be emphasized enough.

So some other items that have not been listed as of yet....

I like landscapes, architecture and city lights, so when I travel, prior to leaving I google the area and take a look at posted images for ideas or vantage points that I might not have considered. I also use google earth, extruding the topography to see what views a location may have.

Tools & Toys - I think that everyone believes that if only I had ______ I would be able to take better pictures - fill in the blank. Yes, you need a minimum set of tools (camera, a lens or two). However, I have come to the belief that not having some tools will make you understand the basics a lot better and result in better images. There are always techniques that can be substituted for the vast majority of the tools. Ira said it best "never let the tools get in the way of the process".

LBA - You can only use one lens at a time, plus to use them you need to tote them. Figure out what interests you and acquire accordingly and carefully.

Last but not least - have fun!!!
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Old Nov 7, 2008, 12:23 AM   #19
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snostorm wrote:
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dafiryde wrote:
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do you use the battery grip with the camdapter grip strap?
Hi Dave,

You can use the Camdapter with the battery grip -- it fits pretty well without any adjustment because the tripod attachment point is offset to the shutter release side on the battery grip. It only helps when holding the camera in landscape orientation though. It kind of gets in the way when using the vertical grip, so I usually remove the Camdapter altogether and use a neck strap. I only really use the battery grip when shooting and event -- 99+ percent of the time, I don't have it mounted.

Scott
i grew so accustom to the camdaptor grip, it some how has a secure feel to it, but i ordered a battery grip which i should get by monday, and since then i have been trying to figure out how to work the two, i still hate neck straps :?



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Old Nov 7, 2008, 12:33 AM   #20
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Gadget - after owning many lowepro bags , i switched to Domke F3X and realised as this bag collapses easily, it now also serves as a bean bag/ tripod,as i can manipulate it to suit what angle or how i want the camera to be.



Tip - shoot, shoot and shoot. look deeply at your pics, and see what went wrong and how it could be corrected



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