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Old Nov 25, 2008, 12:23 AM   #11
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bigdawg,
I have two scanner, a printer all-in-one from Epson and a dedicated scanner from Canon. The Epson does not do negative but the Canon one does.

Honestly, I am not a big fan of having a hardcopy print of my work. Only about %1 of my work are printed. That is why I want to just scan them into my computer and print if something worth printing. Other than that, I would just share my work online.

You said "better to have and learn how to use a light meter." Is it worth getting a light meter at the digital age? Is it worth investing on a light meter when most digital camera have very sophisticated metering system already?
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 5:43 AM   #12
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Hi Superakuma

I used to use a KM which is a "deluxe" version of the K1000. The in built centering needle exposure meter is a classic. Exposure couldn't be easier. Centre weighted exposure meteringI think. Adjust based on part ofscene that you want correctly exposed with the needle centred, re compose, and press the shutter. Same as the earlier spotmatic. So definitely get batteries!!!

But you will learn all this in your course. good luck.

bb2


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Old Nov 25, 2008, 7:39 AM   #13
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I have a small display (about 10 prints) at a local hospital's surgical waiting room (believe me you don't want to be in this place) Mostly landscapes and light houses-try to take them to another place if only for a few moments. All were shot with Fuji 400-biggest enlargement is 12 x 18. I got tired of carrying around different film speeds this film served me well.
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 11:06 AM   #14
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No not for the digital but for the film work. You will save time and money..Film is still costly compared to digital, not having to bracket your shot 3 times every time to be sure you get it right will save even more money. You have no review of the shot so for insurance purposes( to be sure you got that once in a lifetime photo) you'll need to be sure of the exposure. Hurts like H.ll when you get the photo back from processing and the photo pure sucks, and the subject of the photo is a thousand miles away. Too costly to go back and do it again. You can trust the metering needle and bracket the photos if in a pinch but the light meter will be added insurance. Just my 2 cents worth.

Dawg
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 5:23 PM   #15
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superakuma wrote:
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Here are my questions.

What speed film should I use? Should I try to find the lowest ISO film that my camera could take or will 100 do the job? (I will use a tripod for everyshot).Lowest film speed you can use, if you don't want a special grainy effect. You'll also have to decide wether to use negative film for prints or positive for colour slides. Depends on how you want to use them. You can make prints from colour slides, but it's more expensive.

Does it matter which body I will use? Will the P3n give me a better picture over the K1000? With the P3 you can take advantage of lenses with an "A" setting on the aperture ring to use auto exposure setting (the camera mesures the light and chooses f-stop and exposure time, you just point, focusand shoot), with the K1000 it's aperture ring f-stop setting only.For picture quality there is no difference, only in handling. A film body is mainly a film container with a light meter built in, just as I-O says.

Will my digital lens work on the film body? I know my AF lens won't be able to AF, but will the metering work? Besides vignetting, the lack of aperture ring makes them useless on these two bodies.

When I process the film does it matter where I take to process it?
If I have a good scanner that is able to scan film negative, does it matter how they process the film if there are different ways to process it?
I don't know of any place local that does really large print, can I just have a photo lab process the film and print them to 4x6s. After the process it, I can scan the NEGATIVE and convert them to high res digital and print them online. Is that something that can be done? Hardly, but to shoot with film in order to scan the negative to get a digitalized picture to me sounds like taking a taxi from home back home in order to get home. If you want to post process your pictures in the computer, shoot digital. Scanning is the method you use to digitalize pictures taken in the pre-digital era, i e to be able to show them with a theatre projector instead of an oldstyle slide projector. The charm of using film is to get HQ prints with the help of chemicals and light, rather than with a printer.


How big of a print can I go with my Film camera if I use good film and good lens? I have a 50X70 cm print of a colour slide which is absolutely OK when scrutinized from close up. It mainly depends on the viewing distance, if you don't stand too close a 5X7 meters would also look OK.

Last but not lease, I noticed a small battery on my K1000 film camera, what is that for? I don't see any electrical components on the camera. As already have been said, it's for the light meter. A fresh battery will last for years.

I know that is a lot of question that I just asked. But I want to get a better understanding of film so I can understand the true value of photography. And that is why we all are here I think! Thanks for bringing these questions up. I just had a look at my Super Program body and discovered that I haven't even finished the film that was in it when I bought my DS three years ago!

Thanks
-SAi Ditto, Kjell
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 6:52 PM   #16
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An interesting discussion. As far as film goes - I managed to aquire a bunch of rolls of outdated Kodacrome 25 film. It was absolutely the most wonderful film I had ever used, wonderful color and no grain at all. Of course, you have to use fairly slow shutter speeds, even outdoors, and it's not as "punchy" as Fujifilm Velvia.

I preferred to shoot slide film - the extra cost to purchase the film was made up in the fact it was cheaper to develop. Kodacrome is different than regular Ektacrome and can't be developed by local labs (usually has to be sent out to a special lab). A friend of mine said that it was essentially colorized b&w film, so the colors wouldn't shift like Ektacrome does when it gets old. I have no idea if all of this is still true or not- I'm another person who hasn't shot film since I bought my first digital camera.

The main disadvantage to slide is that it's not very forgiving - you have some latitude when developing/printing print film, but not with slides.

Not all places get prints correct - I had a set of pictures that I really liked, they were high contrast shots. I took some of the negatives into a 1-hour printing place to get a second set and the computer they used averaged out the pictures - totally losing that high-contrast look and making them look quite blah (and blew out the whites). After that I started paying for premium processing.
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 8:03 PM   #17
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thanks again everyone for the reply. At the time I have no more questions because everything that I can think of have been answered.

I will have to try out the camera myself to see how it comes out. When I go back to Yosemite, I will bring my digital along as well and use the FILM as a testing camera.
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Old Nov 25, 2008, 11:39 PM   #18
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mtngal wrote:
Quote:
An interesting discussion. As far as film goes - I managed to aquire a bunch of rolls of outdated Kodacrome 25 film. It was absolutely the most wonderful film I had ever used, wonderful color and no grain at all. Of course, you have to use fairly slow shutter speeds, even outdoors, and it's not as "punchy" as Fujifilm Velvia.

I preferred to shoot slide film - the extra cost to purchase the film was made up in the fact it was cheaper to develop. Kodacrome is different than regular Ektacrome and can't be developed by local labs (usually has to be sent out to a special lab). A friend of mine said that it was essentially colorized b&w film, so the colors wouldn't shift like Ektacrome does when it gets old. I have no idea if all of this is still true or not- I'm another person who hasn't shot film since I bought my first digital camera.

The main disadvantage to slide is that it's not very forgiving - you have some latitude when developing/printing print film, but not with slides.

Not all places get prints correct - I had a set of pictures that I really liked, they were high contrast shots. I took some of the negatives into a 1-hour printing place to get a second set and the computer they used averaged out the pictures - totally losing that high-contrast look and making them look quite blah (and blew out the whites). After that I started paying for premium processing.
I am with Harriot

When i was shooting with My ME. My film of choice was Kodachrome 25 slide. If i was not shooting that i was using Tri-X B&W Film

BK

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Old Nov 26, 2008, 9:42 AM   #19
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Hello Superakuma,

I was playing around with film cameras this summer.

RE: Your P3N vs. K1000. The P3N, I believe, reads the film speed via. DX coding on the film canister, which I believe means that you can't deliberately dial-in the wrong iso for the film to push or pull the film? Also, I'm not sure how you apply exposure compensation with that camera. On the K1000, its such a manual camera, that you can dial-in the wrong iso if you want to (in order to do your own type of push or pull or exposure compensation) or . . . since you have the built-in meter, you can just manually over or under-expose the image by either purposely moving the meter line above or below where the camera is telling you to line it up.

As for the meter, it is a center weighted reflective meter, which means that it assumes you are pointing the camera at an average scene and that it will try to expose for an average scene. Thus, all the compensation tricks / rules apply. If you are pointing at something bright, overexpose a bit. If you are pointing at something dark, underexpose a bit.

Also . . .

I went on the cheap when playing with film.

1) I got cheap iso200 film from our dollar store. ($1 for a roll.) (Not the best. But until I take better pictures, its good enough for me. ie. Costs me less to experiment.)

also . . .

2) I got my colour negative film processed at Walmart, which has a non-advertised service of just developing the film and "not" producing any prints for only $1. I did this and then scanned in the negatives into my Epson Perfection 2450 Photo scanner that has the 35mm negative scanner tray & software to scan in the negatives and convert to positve. [I already just happened to have this scanner.]

There was a lot of scratches and dust that I noticed on the scans, but for my purposes it was fine! I could always clean this up with PP if I ever take a good enough shot <grin>

So for $2 (+ taxes) I got 24 shots.

And I was much more happy with what I got! The prints that most automated places give you are so muddy looking. When you avoid getting their prints, you are working from the negatives.

I was playing around with a Vivitar XV-10 and a Pentax K1000. Loved them both. There is something about getting a fully manual camera in your hands. Your mind just wakes up and your fingers start itching to turn those dials! <grin>

Have fun in your course!

Take care,
Glen


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Old Nov 26, 2008, 3:27 PM   #20
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Glen is right, there is no way to dial in the film ISO on the P30/P3, it can only read the DX code on the canister. I first bought this model as my first camera, but since I also bought film on 30 meter rolls andloaded it into the canisters myself (very much cheaper) I had to go back to the shop the next day and change it for the more expensive Program A/Program Plus model. But you can set exposure manually though, so you can push the film by purposely underexpose one or two steps and then "overdevelop" it.

Kjell
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