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Old Nov 25, 2008, 10:48 PM   #1
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Apparently I inadvertently confused someone about Photoshop and how many versions there are of the program by saying that I had bought CS4 Design Premium. So I figure that since I muddied the waters, it made sense that I attempt to clarify things, hopefully in a simplified way.

As a disclaimer, I'm no Photoshop expert, even though I've been using it for a number of years. I'm not claiming that I have everything straight or have the official history of the program at my fingertips. I've just used it since Photoshop 3 and have watched it all evolve from the sidelines.

Adobe has a number of programs that they make/sell - Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign (I think that one grew out of PageMaker, a program I once used on a Mac with something like an 8 inch built-in screen). They were all separate programs and always sold separately. I had originally bought Photoshop 4 then upgraded to Photoshop 6.

After a while Adobe decided to put out their major programs in a suite, that could (as much as possible with programs that have different aims) work together and they put out the first Creative Suite. To differentiate the programs that were part of the suite from their earlier versions, they called the individual programs Photoshop CS, Illustrator CS etc. rather than Photoshop 9 (8? I don't remember what version it was supposed to be).

It didn't take long for photographers to change from calling Photoshop PS(version number) to calling it just CS. This wasn't much of a problem with Creative Suite - I think there was only one version of it and the version of Photoshop sold with it was the same program that was sold separately as Photoshop CS. A photographer who said he was using CS2 meant he was using Photoshop CS2, but he could just as easily been referring to Illustrator CS2 or InDesign CS2.

Confusion really starts with Creative Suite 3. Adobe came out with two different versions of Photoshop - the basic version and Photoshop Extended. And they came out with a couple of different Creative Suite packages, which had slightly different sets of programs. Now instead of "CS_" referring to exactly the same program no matter how it was packaged, there were two different programs.

They've made it worse with CS4 since now there's something like 6 different Creative Suite packages, with different sets of software programs, depending on whether the package is aimed toward web designers or print graphic artists or people who are both. Adobe offers a significant academic discount, so the student store tends to only carry/sell the Creative Suite packages - the cheaper ones cost about what Photoshop on it's own would cost without the discount (or perhaps less, the discount is very significant).

When I said I had bought CS4 Design Premium, it only meant that I bought a specific package of Creative Suite, not that there was a third version of Photoshop. Design Premium has Photoshop Extended (with Bridge) in it, by the way, along with InDesign, Illustrator, Flash Professional, Dreamweaver, Fireworks (I have no idea what this program does yet) and Adobe Acrobat 9 Pro. If you are interested in what is included in which Creative Suite 4 package, there's all kinds of information on Adobe's website.

I hope that this clarifies things - and the bottom line is that there is still only two versions of Photoshop. Of course, that's ignoring the fact that the correct title of the current version of Lightroom is Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 - another program entirely.
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Old Nov 26, 2008, 7:44 PM   #2
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yeah, well... thats just clear as mud Harriet! sure glad you cleared that up.

GW:bye:
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Old Nov 26, 2008, 8:33 PM   #3
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If that clarification were air in my house I'd be running into walls, open doors and furniture all day long!!! LOL Just kidding Harriet. Amazing how some corporations can so royally screw up something so simple isn't it. I bet they have trouble differentiating between their own programs at office meetings. Why not just keep going with the numbers? They could do that to infinity!

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Old Nov 26, 2008, 9:23 PM   #4
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Well. there is always Photoshop Elements - only one version for Windows, and one for Mac. Period. And it does most of what most users would want, without getting too fancy (although it does take many Photoshop plugins to add features). And it is priced reasonably, too.
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Old Nov 26, 2008, 11:44 PM   #5
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LOL! I wondered if anyone would read all the way to the end, but I didn't quite know how to get around offering the past history. Otherwise, it would have been even more confusing.

Now I wonder why, when all of the other programs in Creative Suite are known as CS4, Acrobat is known as Acrobat 9?

I know what you mean about Elements doing pretty much all of what one needs on a regular basis. That's probably what I'd be using now, if a friend of mine hadn't given me a bootleg copy of Photoshop 3. I just have a great time with Photoshop, even though I only use a very small part of the program (though I'm always finding out new things about it).
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Old Nov 27, 2008, 1:07 AM   #6
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I gave up on Photoshop Elements as it would run so slow on my old G4 Mac Mini.
I rebuilt a old pc with new m/b, cpu and ram. Then I installed Ubuntu 8.10 ( no virus or malware software needed and all free ) and now use Gimp 2.6, it is said to be as powerful as Photoshop. I find it incredible and runs so fast with my dual core and 8gig of ram.
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Old Nov 27, 2008, 5:01 AM   #7
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Hi All

Seeing the mentioning of Photoshop Elements and knowing that Yousown several lenses of different makes of analog and of digital design, please let me ask:

1.:When using a digital designed lens such af Sigma or Tamron,can the exif metadata such as f-number and focal length be seen in Photoshop Elements ?

2.:Is there a way to "teach" the K20D which of the analog lenses were used ? As of now PSE tells that the lens is "unknown". - I presume there will be no way to get the exif metadata from an analog lens of the K and M pre auto-aperture generations ?

3.: Would it be wiser to use Pentax Lab 3, instead of PSE 5 ?

( Hm, Ehrh -Could anyone please explain what "LOL" means ?)

Thank You

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Old Nov 27, 2008, 8:14 AM   #8
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OW wrote:
Quote:
Hi All

Seeing the mentioning of Photoshop Elements and knowing that Yousown several lenses of different makes of analog and of digital design, please let me ask:

1.:When using a digital designed lens such af Sigma or Tamron,can the exif metadata such as f-number and focal length be seen in Photoshop Elements ?

Yes!! As long as its a newer Lense. PSE reads the EXIF from my Sigma 70-300

2.:Is there a way to "teach" the K20D which of the analog lenses were used ? As of now PSE tells that the lens is "unknown". - I presume there will be no way to get the exif metadata from an analog lens of the K and M pre auto-aperture generations ?

I Cannot answer this since I dont have a K20. But i do not believe So

3.: Would it be wiser to use Pentax Lab 3, instead of PSE 5 ?

I personally don't like the Pentax Interface. So i use PSE

( Hm, Ehrh -Could anyone please explain what "LOL" means ?)

LOL= Laugh Out Loud

Thank You

Ole

















Hope this helps

BK
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Old Nov 27, 2008, 9:04 AM   #9
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When I turn my K10D on with a manual lens mounted it asks what lens focal lenth I'm using. This info is used to set the anti-shake so it will work properly with that focal length and it also puts that info in the EXIF data.

The Aperture setting won't be there unless you are using an A lens or an all auto lens. But you can use a EXIF editing program and add it in later. I use PhotoMe to do this. A totally free program that not only will allow you to edit the data but will tell you more about your camera and the photo than you will ever need to know,,I mean really in depth info. Go here for the download...
http://www.photome.de/download_en.html

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Old Nov 27, 2008, 11:02 AM   #10
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Dear SirKnight

Your answers were most helpfull !

I'm about to buy a "super Zoom" for 2 reasons:

1.: It a convience to have an all-purpose-lens fixed, when just recordingfamily events, and NOT being "artistic".

2.: Via exif data on focal length, I hope to learn just HOW do I see the world ? I'm inclined to think that I see it in 25-30 degrees and a close to normal perspective.

Butam I truly "normal" ?-Might I be a lover of the dramatic perspective and foot-to-horizon sharpness ofr the wideangle ? => Or am I a lover of theimage of the tele leaving only subject/object in focus, with the rest of the world in a decotative blur ?

Thats what I hope to learn from using a super Zoom, along with looking at exif data on the focal length ! Thus being able to search for "the right focal length prime lens".

This approach is of couse dictated by limited financial means, as prices in Denmark are pretty steep. But now is possible to buy the 1.st generation Tamron 18-200mm for the equivalent of 240 USdollars. And with that I hope toobtain a more selective and less costly LBA.

KR

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