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Old Jan 7, 2009, 5:51 PM   #1
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I'm well aware that all images whether digital or old fashioned film which degrade over time, don't last for ever but after 8 years (or earlier as I hadn't previously tried to access them until now), I'm getting disk read errors - well to be exact, nothing at all.

I stored the digital images on different makes of CDROMs (before DVDs were commercially available) and stored them in different locations but now find that some of the earlier ones cannot be read.

I've tried several different readers, even using the old CDROM drive without success. I've even tried using disk recovery software without any success.

Fortuneately, but not a solution, I have these stored on my web site but at a resolution which is fine for that purpose but not suitable to use in re-editing.

I don't trust hard drives as I have experience where the bearings dry out if they are not used regularly, also redering the data inaccessible.

So what's the answer - ideas anyone, or shoud I use a film camera to copy the images. At least they degrade & don't totally give up the ghost. I still have my collection of black & white and colour slides, stored in an attic which sees extreme changes in temperature which are viewable after 40 years.
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Old Jan 7, 2009, 6:28 PM   #2
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This si the trouble with storage mediums today. In a disposeable society, nothing is designed to last past a year.

Short of going through and backing up your backups every year, there is little you can do.

Welcome to the digital age.....



Dal


BTW have you tried Bad Copy Pro? I used this a few years ago to access a disc which would read in any of my drives, and it recovered around 85-90% of the images.

I think you can still d/l the trial version which shows what is recoverable before you buy it.
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 2:46 AM   #3
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With most recovery programs sometimes they work and sometimes they don't. Here are two that have worked for me....

http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/...y/Recuva.shtml

http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/...Uneraser.shtml

And some just for CD's & DVD's

http://www.softwarepatch.com/software/cd-recovery.html

http://www.octanesoft.com/cd_dvd_data_recovery.html

http://www.jufsoft.com/badcopy/cdrec...p;kid=gccr0401

There are a ton of these for free out there. If it were me I'd download and try a whole bunch of them before giving up. Google CD recovery before giving up!

Dawg
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 9:19 AM   #4
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Optical media is strange and will go bad without any warning and the time varies no matter what brand you use. Older CD's are the worst offenders since they were just figuring out the media not to many years ago.

Personally I had this happen to me a while ago and found that using a older computer allowed me to read the disk, where my newer computers would not see anything on the CD. I have Mac's which seem to stay functional longer than PC's and just put the CD into the tray loading drive on my 500Mhz Powerbook and like magic the photos were there.

I took a class on storage for computer data once and was told that CD+R's were the worst to save data on and that CD-R's were far more stable over time. That was an issue for me since older Mac's would only write to CD+R's for a while and that is what I had issues with.

Shutterbug Magazine had an editorial on what they called the "Lost Generation" where they claimed that with everyone going digital, 100 years from now there will be no images of anyone left since they will have degraded to nothing by then. Unlike last month when I went through my Grandfathers things and found a box of negatives from the 30's that were good as new (B&W) and like my Kodachrome slides from Viet Nam in the 60"s that also look like new. That said my Ectachrome slides from the same time are fading at a high rate of speed, although Digital Ice in my Nikon film scanner seems to be able to bring them back to life.

Sorry for the ramblng but try a few older computers even a Mac compared to a PC and possibly you will have something positive that comes from it.

Tom


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Old Jan 8, 2009, 10:16 AM   #5
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Catbells wrote:
Quote:
I'm well aware that all images whether digital or old fashioned film which degrade over time, don't last for ever but after 8 years (or earlier as I hadn't previously tried to access them until now), I'm getting disk read errors - well to be exact, nothing at all.

I stored the digital images on different makes of CDROMs (before DVDs were commercially available) and stored them in different locations but now find that some of the earlier ones cannot be read.

I've tried several different readers, even using the old CDROM drive without success. I've even tried using disk recovery software without any success.

Fortuneately, but not a solution, I have these stored on my web site but at a resolution which is fine for that purpose but not suitable to use in re-editing.

I don't trust hard drives as I have experience where the bearings dry out if they are not used regularly, also redering the data inaccessible.

So what's the answer - ideas anyone, or shoud I use a film camera to copy the images. At least they degrade & don't totally give up the ghost. I still have my collection of black & white and colour slides, stored in an attic which sees extreme changes in temperature which are viewable after 40 years.
Hi, I had almost 100% recovery from corrupted CDs a couple of years back with software from this source

http://www.infinadyne.com/

The version I had was for CD only that I got with a computer magazine, they seem to have advanced now to a CD/DVD version. There is a trial version which will at least

prove if your files are recoverable ... full recovery needs purchase, hope this helps ... Jack
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 12:54 PM   #6
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i had this problem once and managed to recover the pictures using a very old computer like Tom did.
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 3:04 PM   #7
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kazuya wrote:
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i had this problem once and managed to recover the pictures using a very old computer like Tom did.
Thanks for all the responses & advise I've tried using the CDROM that was likely used to create the CDROM, but without success.

Trying the CDROM Diagnostics software but after several hours, it's still going - looks like it's going to be a long night.
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 4:14 PM   #8
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I have recently read that CD-RWs are inherently unstable and more likely to degrade sooner, and that CD-R media are more stable. So save your images until you have enough to fill a disc in one session, and skip using the RWs. And transfer your images from any CD-RWs you might have. In fact it is probably a good idea to transfer any files from old to new discs or newer media periodically. You can get more images on a DVD, but if you lose one, you lose more images, so make additional copies -- back up, back up, back up!
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Old Jan 9, 2009, 12:45 AM   #9
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penolta is correct, CD-RW's are the worst for storing images on for any length of time as they fail after a very short period of time. I forgot about them since now that thumb drives are so cheap, I never use CD-RW's any more.

Tom
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Old Jan 9, 2009, 4:34 AM   #10
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ennacac wrote:
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penolta is correct, CD-RW's are the worst for storing images on for any length of time as they fail after a very short period of time. I forgot about them since now that thumb drives are so cheap, I never use CD-RW's any more.

Tom
Tom, personally I prefer external USB drives, it's a way of using any surplus HDDs I have lying about, the cases for them are relatively cheap, and I have had a couple of

thumb drives go kaput, they're not absolutely infallible. ... Jack.

PS. I should add that apart from my very first PC, all the rest have been home built, and spare parts are plentiful here, I realise not all members will have that facility. ... J
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