Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 29, 2009, 8:22 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

This one showed up this afternoon for a few minutes. Shot with a K10D Pentax camera and a 200mm F/3.5 Vivitar fixed mount lens (Komine made) at about 100+ feet and then cropped. Can you help me identify it? The detail is there but this bird has very smooth silky feathers. Had a sheen to it.









Dawg
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 29, 2009, 8:29 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
ennacac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 4,198
Default

That my friend is a Cedar Waxwing!

Tom
ennacac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2009, 8:45 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Goldwinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Posts: 6,515
Default

Yup, that's a fact.:-)
GW:bye:
Goldwinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2009, 9:27 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

ennacac wrote:
Quote:
That my friend is a Cedar Waxwing!

Tom
Thanks Tom. Unusual here.

Dawg
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2009, 9:28 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

Goldwinger wrote:
Quote:
Yup, that's a fact.:-)
GW:bye:
Thanks GW.
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2009, 10:17 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: East Central Vermont
Posts: 1,890
Default

I don't know much about birds, so it's rare for me to be able to answer a question about a bird's identity. This time, I actually knew, but others answered your question before I had a chance. But when I saw your pics, I said to myself, "What is a Cedar Waxwing doing in Alabama?" I certainly would not expect to see one in your area! Numbers 2 and 3 are especially nice shots.
mtnman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 29, 2009, 11:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Trojansoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Posts: 3,724
Default

Ed, I can identify with your surprise at seeing one of these birds. A few weeks ago, I was just testing a long focus on a bird that I assumed was one of my regulars, and was surprised to see it was a waxwing. (Distance was too great for it to be a decent photo, but was good enough for a clear ID.)

I wish we had more of them because I think they're one of the more attractive birds I've ever photographed. (I've seen a few of them in other parts of Arkansas.) I think we may get them, in Arkansas and Alabama both, in migratory periods.

Your photos are great.

Paul
Trojansoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 30, 2009, 11:37 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

mtnman wrote:
Quote:
I don't know much about birds, so it's rare for me to be able to answer a question about a bird's identity. This time, I actually knew, but others answered your question before I had a chance. But when I saw your pics, I said to myself, "What is a Cedar Waxwing doing in Alabama?" I certainly would not expect to see one in your area! Numbers 2 and 3 are especially nice shots.
It is the first I've seen here for sure. That is why I didn't know the name. Very unusual. And thanks for the comments.

Dawg
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 30, 2009, 11:39 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
bigdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Thach Alabama
Posts: 14,981
Default

Trojansoc wrote:
Quote:
Ed, I can identify with your surprise at seeing one of these birds. A few weeks ago, I was just testing a long focus on a bird that I assumed was one of my regulars, and was surprised to see it was a waxwing. (Distance was too great for it to be a decent photo, but was good enough for a clear ID.)

I wish we had more of them because I think they're one of the more attractive birds I've ever photographed. (I've seen a few of them in other parts of Arkansas.) I think we may get them, in Arkansas and Alabama both, in migratory periods.

Your photos are great.

Paul
I'm with you on their beauty Paul . Must be a migratory thing. I appreciate your comments. Just glad I had a decent lens on at the time.

Dawg
bigdawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 30, 2009, 1:06 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

You are right, Paul, in that it is a migratory thing. Cedar Waxwings can be found any where in the southern and central tiers of states in the winter, and on down into Mexico and Central America. They tend to concentrate where there are sources of berries, which they eat. In winter here Southern California they tend to frequent the ornamental Ficus trees around which they swarm like so many bees after the little figs they bear. They are actually very noisy and can be heard before they are seen flying between trees, but their calls are in so high a frequency that I and others, who have lost the ability to hear those high tones with advancing age, are no longer aware of their presence unless we see them. Bohemian Waxwings are more northern and seldom reach into the South.

An interesting fact is that the red wax that gives them their name is derived from red berries that they eat. They are unable to excrete the pigments (or their metabolites) by normal pathways, and so get rid of them by depositing them on the ends of the secondary flight feathers and sometimes even the tail feathers as new feathers are formed during the annual molt.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:57 AM.