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Old Apr 3, 2009, 3:17 PM   #1
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I have the opportunity to buy a Samsung GX10, which I understand to be identical to the Pentax K10D, at a very good price due to Samsung sell off this model.

There are offers on the body, body + 18-55, or body plus 18-55 and 50-200.

However, I have read reports of image softness on the camera (irrespective of the lens used) and would like your comments on this please.

Also, which package would you advise?
Are the kit lenses worth including or should I just get the body and get lenses separately?

Thanks
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 3:53 PM   #2
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I don't know what camera you are coming from, but the Samsung is an excellent model to choose. It is a fully functional, semi-pro camera at a fraction of the Nikon/Canon prices.

Try to get both the kit lenses, as they are probably the best kit ones out there.

Once you have spent some time with them, you can decide where you interest lays, and begin collecting more glass.

I had the K10D more for snob value than anything else, and found it to be an excellent performer in all conditions. I now have the K20D.

As for the images being soft, that is only in comparison with Canon/Nikon models, which oversharpen in camera at the expense of detail.

If you shoot RAW, then there will be no difference. Plus it is always best to sharpen in software yourself.


My advice, go for it. You won't regret it.


Dal


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Old Apr 3, 2009, 4:27 PM   #3
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Dal1970 wrote:
Quote:
I don't know what camera you are coming from, but the Samsung is an excellent model to choose. It is a fully functional, semi-pro camera at a fraction of the Nikon/Canon prices.

Try to get both the kit lenses, as they are probably the best kit ones out there.

Once you have spent some time with them, you can decide where you interest lays, and begin collecting more glass.

I had the K10D more for snob value than anything else, and found it to be an excellent performer in all conditions. I now have the K20D.

As for the images being soft, that is only in comparison with Canon/Nikon models, which oversharpen in camera at the expense of detail.

If you shoot RAW, then there will be no difference. Plus it is always best to sharpen in software yourself.


My advice, go for it. You won't regret it.


Dal

Thanks Dal,

I originally come from Pentax film SLRs in the 70's, and loved the control and manual ability. Since then I've had digital compacts such as the Panasonic FZ10.
I just feel I will get better IQ from the bigger sensors of the DSLRs.

I'm very tempted.
I've tried the feel of the GX10 in the shop and it handles well and is built like a tank.

Tell me, why did you move to the K20D and do you still have the K10D?

Mike
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 7:05 PM   #4
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Hey Joggerman,
I don't want to put any one down for the equipment they have so, this is nothing personal towards anyone but, this is my opinion based on my personal experience.
I started out with the Samsung GX10. to make a very long story short... I loved it at first, then it started acting up. sent it back for repair. they sent me a reconditioned body. In three months I went through 3 bodies, all worked fine when I got them and then quit within 2-3 weeks. I finally demanded my money back. It took them 4 months to finally send me a check. When I finally got it, the price of the K20 had dropped quite a bit, I added $30 to it and got the K20 which I'm very happy with! I also purchased a used K10 for my wife last month and I'm happy with it too. As far as the lenses you mentioned, well... lets just say you get what you pay for and as far as lenes go, these are pretty inexspensive. take it for what it's worth. this is only my opinion but, I'd hate to see somebody else go through the hassle I did. could drive a man to drink.
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 9:31 PM   #5
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My main DSLR is a K10D that has the same sensor as the Samsung and I am very happy with the sharpness of my images.

But I do shoot RAW almost exclusively.

I think the criticism relates more to the in camera conversion to the compressed JPEG format.

When I do shoot JPEGS they are still pretty good and I use this format for covenience, when I want quality I shoot RAW.

I have an 18-55 kit lens and it is a reasonable performer particularly for shots of people. It is a bit soft at the edges for landscape and scenic work.



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Old Apr 3, 2009, 11:42 PM   #6
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I think the first thing to look at is how good of a price you are going to get on the GX10 vs. a K20 (which is selling for a very good price, at least in the US). I used to have the K10 and sold it when I upgraded to the K20. The K10 is a fine camera, though some of the early ones had problems with back-focusing (mine did a bit, not as much as some others). I don't know if the Samsung had similar problems with their first models - I would want to test the camera I was going to buy in-store, if possible, to make sure it doesn't do that. But unless it's significantly cheaper than the current K20, I'd rather have the K20, it's a better camera in my opinion. Now if it's really inexpensive, then get it and start saving up for the K20 or 30 or whatever is current in a year or two or three. It can keep you occupied for that long or longer.

The 18-55 is a reasonable lens especially for the price. The newer one is supposed to be better, but I can't speak to that as I have the older version (the one that would come with the GX or K10, though mine came with a DS). I still have it though I don't use it much any more. I didn't like my copy of the 50-200 and it's now broken. It's long since out of warranty and it would cost almost as much to get it fixed as a new one - instead I bought the 55-300 to replace it (a better lens, but still has some short-comings). It all depends on what you want to use the camera for as to what lenses you should get. If you are primarily interested in birding, skip the 50-200 and get something longer like the 55-300 or Tamron's 70-300 (and so on).

Do you still have your old Pentax lenses? If so, you might want to adjust your lens purchase accordingly and use your old film lenses for a while. Two of my favorite lenses are older, manual focus lenses (the A*300 and the Vivitar Series One 105mm macro).

As far as the softness issue - it never bothered me (though I do shoot mostly raw, and have done so since I discovered it with an FZ30). You can adjust how much sharpness the camera can produce, though I actually preferred it's output. If I wanted additional sharpening, I'd use software to add a bit more.
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Old Apr 4, 2009, 2:16 AM   #7
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joggerman wrote:
Quote:
Dal1970 wrote:
Quote:
I don't know what camera you are coming from, but the Samsung is an excellent model to choose. It is a fully functional, semi-pro camera at a fraction of the Nikon/Canon prices.

Try to get both the kit lenses, as they are probably the best kit ones out there.

Once you have spent some time with them, you can decide where you interest lays, and begin collecting more glass.

I had the K10D more for snob value than anything else, and found it to be an excellent performer in all conditions. I now have the K20D.

As for the images being soft, that is only in comparison with Canon/Nikon models, which oversharpen in camera at the expense of detail.

If you shoot RAW, then there will be no difference. Plus it is always best to sharpen in software yourself.


My advice, go for it. You won't regret it.


Dal

Thanks Dal,

I originally come from Pentax film SLRs in the 70's, and loved the control and manual ability. Since then I've had digital compacts such as the Panasonic FZ10.
I just feel I will get better IQ from the bigger sensors of the DSLRs.

I'm very tempted.
I've tried the feel of the GX10 in the shop and it handles well and is built like a tank.

Tell me, why did you move to the K20D and do you still have the K10D?

Mike
Hi Mike

I have been shooting with various cameras for around 30 years

When I went to a digital SLR I got the DL2 as it was at a very good price (despite being a Nikon fan)

I changed from the DL2 to the K10D for the better body controls and layout, plus I like a big heavy camera.

When the K20D came out, I waited for a good price then upgraded, more for the improved sensor than anything else (CMOS vs CCD) as I had just come back from holiday where I had been shooting in some caves, and the higher ISO and better low light capabilities would have really been useful.

Added to that, nearly everything else in the camera sems to have been tightened up in the K20D - the focus seems faster and the camera more responsive, plus there are some more useful features added.

More importantly, I am a bit of a gadget freak....

I sold the K10D, as it was too heavey for the wife to use.

I agree with the other posts, though. If you have the money to get the K20D instead, then that is the best one at the moment. All I meant was, is that you won't be disappointed with the GX10 and it will last you as long as you want it to.


Dal
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Old Apr 4, 2009, 1:28 PM   #8
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I use a K10D exclusively and shoot almost all Jpeg. If you post process you will need to sharpen some but the photos will be sharp and contrasty and very good color. Given the choice I'd go for the K20D even if it is a bit more in price. The only thing holding me back from a K20D is I'm waiting till the K30D comes out and a lot of the folks that have to ride the crest of the Technology wave upgrade and sell off theirs. But for now my K10D will work just fine! Then the price will be right for me.

As for the lens..the 18-55 kit lens is quite good and a lot of bang for what little they cost. I'm using a lot of 1970's and 80's vintage lenses right now and having a ball doing so. If you have any old lens...don't get rid of them...use them for they are still very good.

Dawg
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Old Apr 5, 2009, 11:55 PM   #9
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I've had the K10D for a year and a half, and it's a great buy. The K20D is a bit more, but the reports are excellent. The kit lenses are good, for the price. I found that the Sigma 17-70 macro, and the Pentax 55-300mm are better lenses. More expensive, but worth the price if you can afford it. Both are sharper and have better contrast in most ranges. That's assuming you use good technique to take advantage of them. Careful use will give very good results with the kit lenses too. The K20 is now about what the (then new) K10D cost. Just remember, you need a good tripod too. Anti-shake works, but does not eliminate the need for one with any camera made today.
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