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Old Apr 11, 2009, 7:35 PM   #11
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Nice to see something get done so quickly and efficiently. Here it seems there would be 2 men working and 5 more supervising. I like the series.
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Old Apr 11, 2009, 9:04 PM   #12
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Interesting series Kjell. I, also, never visualized you having to negotiate an access road like that to get home. Makes me wonder, who is responsible for clearing the snow in winter?

When you live in Buffalo, NY you worry about things like that.

During one of our worst snow storms, when streets weren't getting cleared for a week, the Mayor of Buffalo suggested that the citizens get a six pack of beer and just stay home. He was Irish.

Jim
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Old Apr 11, 2009, 11:40 PM   #13
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Love the series of pictures, construction is always interesting, though not always easy to photograph. You've done really well with these. And it's a good thing you didn't have to go anywhere that morning. While I had assumed you lived in a rural area, I didn't realize your road was that rural. We live in a rural area, but even the dirt roads up here (other than the National Forest trails) are wider than single track.
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 3:27 AM   #14
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Thanks for the comments, all!

Jim, I'm reponsible for clearing the snow, as well as for any maintenance of this road. It's my entirely private road. If I was Bill Gates (or he was my uncle) I'dpave the road and put up road lights.:-)In the last picture you can see my house just over the car roof.

We have three levels of roads in this country.

a) Public roads, owned, paid and maintained by the state. All major roads belong to these.

b) Private roads, owned and maintained by a minor road association (membership is compulsary for those living along the road) but subsidized by the state. In most cases the subsidies are enough to keep the maintenance at a good level. The road we "belong" to is tarred, and so far we have never paid a cent, the state subsidy even pays the coffee and the cinnamon bun at the annual meeting.

c) Private roads like mine. There is no right of admission for the general public, and maintenance is entirely up to the owner/user, normally only one farmer or as in my case family. Normally these roads are very short, I think mine with it's 600 meters is some kind of national record. The state of my road depend on theslimness of my wallet.

Kjell


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Old Apr 12, 2009, 6:26 AM   #15
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bilybianca wrote:
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Normally these roads are very short, I think mine with it's 600 meters is some kind of national record. The state of my road depend on theslimness of my wallet.

Kjell

I thought Sweden is a lot more populated than Canada. Gee 600mm long roadway! Good enough to land a small plane huh? That is a lot of work and expense too

Daniel
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 7:21 AM   #16
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bilybianca wrote:
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c) Private roads like mine. There is no right of admission for the general public, and maintenance is entirely up to the owner/user, normally only one farmer or as in my case family. Normally these roads are very short, I think mine with it's 600 meters is some kind of national record. The state of my road depend on theslimness of my wallet.
I am very glad that I don't have to handle maintenance on my road, because ours is the only house on it and is about the same length as yours. Fortunately, it is maintained by the county, and graders go over it two or three times a year. Because it's one-lane dirt with a couple of steep hills, my wife and I each had four wheel drives when we both worked. With her retired, we can get away with one.

I'm like Keltech about admiring the efficiency of the work. Around here, the road would be torn up for a couple of weeks, even for installation of a culvert.

The size of the drainage ditches and adjacent fields make me wonder what crops are grown. I notice that one field is already green while the others either aren't yet planted or haven't yet emerged.

Kjell, thanks for a fascinating look at a slice of rural life in Sweden. Extremely interesting and the photos are great.

Paul
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 9:09 PM   #17
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The roads around here fall into a similar structure, though the names of the organizations and level of public funds vary. The short version is that there are public roads, private roads that belong to home-owners associations and private roads that belong to individuals. Any of them may or may not be paved - Forest Service roads are often not paved. In my area, the county maintained roads are paved, while home-owner association roads are paved or not depending on the association. Like your system, if you live within the association you pay whatever fees the association requires and its up to the association what it does (mine has paved roads and does its own snow plowing, while another area has dirt roads and no clearing provided. Other areas don't have an association and everyone is on their own).

You live in a beautiful area, definitely my kind of place.
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 9:24 PM   #18
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I serve on my local town's selectboard (the local town government board; roughly equivalent to a city council or board of aldermen in more urban areas). We have to oversee this kind of work all the time, but we try to be very careful about announcing road closures well in advance. If a sudden storn washes out a road, that's one thing, but if it something like a routine culvert replacement, the people in our town would be very angry if we did not give people ample warning. These are great photos. In this country the company doing the work could get cited because the guy picking up the rock is not wearing a hard hat.
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