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Old May 3, 2009, 10:35 AM   #1
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Hello & Help!

How do I get rid of the reflection of the candle lights?

I was playing around with my Pentax A 50mm f1.7 (with UV filter on) on my K100D. [Edit: Oh, yeah. Aperture was f2.8]

I've had it out before to try to capture shots with candle light. And I got the candle reflections before as well.

Is this because I have the filter on, or is there a trick not to get the reflections to show up, or is it just the wrong focal length?

Take care, yours truly,
Glen



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Old May 3, 2009, 12:21 PM   #2
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Not sure if the filter would cause that effect Glen, you could try without it. In any event the spot healing brush in PS makes short work of the reflections, I did this very

quickly spend a bit more time and get a better resultassuming you have PS of course. ... Jack
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Old May 3, 2009, 12:44 PM   #3
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I do not believe in using any filter unless it is for special effect. Polarizing is one I would use, there is no substitute in photoshop. Why place a window (another piece of glass) in front of a fine lens.

You can remove in photoshop with Healing Brush or spot healing brush tools.

Ed
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Old May 3, 2009, 1:54 PM   #4
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Hi Glenn,

I'm pretty sure this is a flare effect of the filter relecting back into the lens. If you must use a filter (you've mentioned protection against small children and flying goop in another thread. . .:-) ), then you'll probably be well served by looking into getting the best multi-coated filter you can find from a top brand company. Of course, PP can be an alternative, but flare can also cause AF performance problems, or the "ghost" reflections might obscure important details in another situation.

I'd opt fot the MC filter in your case, but it'll probably be a bit pricey -- so then you'll be worried about your expensive filter. . .:?:-)

Scott
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Old May 3, 2009, 8:37 PM   #5
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I never ever use a filter when shooting inside with a flash. Not even with a portrait and warming filter. Too easy to adjust warmth in Photoshop. Also I do not use the healing brush much but rather use the Clone tool instead. I like filters outside for landscapes and that is about it. Just my way.

Dawg
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Old May 3, 2009, 9:04 PM   #6
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Well I just used software, did a bit of cloning and clean-up. By way it's a nice happy shot.
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Old May 3, 2009, 9:10 PM   #7
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Hey there!

Thanks for the replies everyone. I really appreciate it!

I just did some digging around the web & found this posting where someone had the same problem I am having.

http://photo.net/beginner-photograph...s-forum/00SY9s

I'm not 100% convinced that it's as simple as the filter. Although I'd be really happy if it were. I'll remove the filter if it is a simple fix to correct this drastic problem! And I'll give it a try the next time I'm up against some candles.

I'm going to try the test that someone suggested in the thread above.

If I can't resolve the reflection issue, I might give my 28-80 f3.5-5.6 a try in that situation. I'd get AF, but have to crank the ISO up a bit to freeze the action.

Any other suggestions on using the 50mm in this situation or other ways to get rid of the reflections?

Take care, yours truly,
Glen




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Old May 3, 2009, 9:12 PM   #8
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Oh, yeah!

And thanks for all the PP!

You guys are the best!

Rodney, that last one really lightens up the mood of the shot. I like it!

Take care, yours truly,
Glen


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Old May 3, 2009, 10:06 PM   #9
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This effect came to notice some time ago with photos of European endurance sports car racing. As they race at night, or in very dim conditions, they use their headlights, and photogtaphers started noticing stange headlight reflections in their images, just like your candles.

The concensus is that it is a light reflection off the sesnor and then reflection back once again from the last lens element.

Normally the levels of these reflections are so low they are negligible in most shots. However in siuations where teh genral light level is low and you have a very bright point source of light they can be noticed.


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Old May 3, 2009, 10:56 PM   #10
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philneast wrote:
Quote:
This effect came to notice some time ago with photos of European endurance sports car racing. As they race at night, or in very dim conditions, they use their headlights, and photogtaphers started noticing stange headlight reflections in their images, just like your candles.

The concensus is that it is a light reflection off the sesnor and then reflection back once again from the last lens element.

Normally the levels of these reflections are so low they are negligible in most shots. However in siuations where teh genral light level is low and you have a very bright point source of light they can be noticed.*

Hi Phil,

Good point! I don't think much about digital coatings since they very rarely, if ever, would have an effect on the subjects that I shoot. The only instance I've seen before this was a macro shot, and it appeared as a small light dot in the center of the frame.

If this was caused by sensor reflection, then a digitally optimized lens might help -- about the first situation that I've actually seen that could really illustrate how these coatings are beneficial.

Scott
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