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Old May 28, 2009, 9:38 PM   #11
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Jack-
"Blown Highlight" is a term that refers to the fact that there is a serious loss of detail in the highlighted areas of your photos. It is for that reason, that some Pentaxians opt to reduce their exposure by using an appropriate EV setting, usually either EV-0.3 or EV-0.7 to throttle back the exposure, while retaining those critical fine details details.

Sarah Joyce
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Old May 28, 2009, 9:46 PM   #12
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Jack-
"Blown Highlight" is a term that refers to the fact that there is a serious loss of detail in the highlighted areas of your photos. It is for that reason, that some Pentaxians opt to reduce their exposure by using an appropriate EV setting, usually either EV-0.3 or EV-0.7 to throttle back the exposure, while retaining those critical fine details details.

Sarah Joyce
Oh Ok. I have it set on EV-0.3 now. I guess I'd better try EV-07 next time. I've been doing this since film days.

Here are a couple more I took today



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Old May 29, 2009, 9:02 AM   #13
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. . . the feathers look a bit soft or lacking in detail. (Or maybe it's just my old eyes!!) Thanks for sharing a great, colorful, well-composed series!
I was wondering if it was just me or if these images looked a little soft. Can't tell if it is a focus issue or some camera shake. I'd recommend using a tripod with a remote trigger the next time you shoot. Lighting and compositions look good!
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Old May 29, 2009, 9:33 AM   #14
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I was wondering if it was just me or if these images looked a little soft. Can't tell if it is a focus issue or some camera shake. I'd recommend using a tripod with a remote trigger the next time you shoot. Lighting and compositions look good!
Based on the focal lengths I would suggest the lack of detail is due to over-cropping to compensate for too short a focal length. Especially with feather detail, you need to fill the frame in-camera to retain the detail. That's why shooting small birds is so difficult - you actually need more focal length for the smaller birds than the raptors.

Minor correction - one other thing I noticed was short shutter speeds - even when filling the frame, fine feathers move. I see1/250 shutter speeds - so you'll get some blur with slow shutter speeds as fine feathers move. The easy way to tell the difference is - are the eyes and beak sharp? If eyes and beak are sharp and lack of feather detail then it's likely motion blur in the fine feathers. But if the eyes and beak are not tack sharp then the cropping is likely an issue (assuming you're not slow enough to have camera shake given IS).

Last edited by JohnG; May 29, 2009 at 9:36 AM.
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Old May 29, 2009, 10:08 AM   #15
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these are stellar..(yes, it's a pun)
#5 is shot with a nikon tho..coolpix
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Old May 29, 2009, 11:41 AM   #16
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A note on feather detail - due to their peculiar structure, the blue feathers on the Scrub Jay can have a reflective sheen to them that could mask some of the feather detail - this is particularly noticeable on the head in the close portraits. Not so with the white feathers, though whites can be tough, nor the eyes and beak. As Jim indicates, eye sharpness is key in portraits - if they are sharp, the viewer does not perceive the remaining unsharpness as so obvious a fault.
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Old May 29, 2009, 1:14 PM   #17
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Oh Ok. I have it set on EV-0.3 now. I guess I'd better try EV-07 next time. I've been doing this since film days.

Here are a couple more I took today

Hey Jack,
yeah, what Sarah said. seems to be a big problem for me too, if I expose for the highlights then the darker portions of the image come out under exposed. If I'm close enough to use my 540 flash in hi speed sync mode then that helps overcome the under exposure problem, other wise the only way I've managed is to under expose, then use PP to correct the overall exposure. And, before anyone starts yelling at me for not using the camera to do it right in the first place... I know, I know, I'm not suggesting anybody do that, its just the only way I've been able to manage so far. I'm still learning.
Now, if you want to know more about using flash, the best info I've read to date on the subject, is on this forum posted over a year ago by our very own "Sarah Joyce"! very informative and worth looking it up.

BTW, on the K10, you have the option of setting the "exposure warning" in the menu so when you review your shot, it will flash red/yellow for over/under exposure respectively.
Keep up the good work!
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Old May 29, 2009, 1:43 PM   #18
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Hey Jack,
I expose for the highlights then the darker portions of the image come out under exposed. .
The K20D has an expanded dynamic range function that helps here. Since the K10D lacks this function, bracketing the exposures and using an HDR merge may be an option.
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Old May 29, 2009, 1:47 PM   #19
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Ok, some of you are wondering if I'm cropping in and why I'm using a slower shutter speed.
First, yes, I was cropping it to bring the jay in. Expected some loss of sharpness doing that.
Second, I was more concerned about blurring the background and why I used a slower shutter speed. Not much choice there.
Third, I have to hand hold the camera as the jay moves around. I don't know which tree he is going to end up in.

Now this shot was this morning and I managed to zoom in closer. I only cropped to 8x10, kept the same resolution/size. So how is this shot?

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Old May 29, 2009, 2:03 PM   #20
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Jack - beak looks good. But why ISO 100 and 1/180? I think you're still losing feather details by such slow shutter speeds. Jump up to 400 and get a faster shutter speed. I think you'll end up with an even sharper shot.

But still a very sharp shot as-is.

Last edited by JohnG; May 29, 2009 at 2:11 PM.
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