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Old Jun 2, 2009, 4:10 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by mole View Post
Ronny - once again an amazing set of photos - such wonderful detail and careful composition. Especially like the springtail "hitch-hiker!"
Thanks Mole, that hitch-hiker was a fun find.
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Old Jun 2, 2009, 4:11 PM   #22
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Very good job Ronny! Though I'm not really much into macro, the amazing feast of details still keep me stroll up and down!
Thanks for the great comment bahadir

Ronny
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Old Jun 2, 2009, 4:12 PM   #23
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I agree with Kjell - your pictures are both technically and artistically pleasing. This weekend I took some pictures that were technically amazing to me, but artistically boring and incomprehensible. I definitely appreciate yours!
Thanks Harriet, you are also to kind

Ronny
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Old Jun 3, 2009, 10:03 PM   #24
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In spite of opinions to the contrary, I have always maintained that diopters can produce excellent results (although Raynox lenses are a cut above the average plus lens), and you certainly prove it. These are superb images. How you get them to sit still long enough to get your equipment set up and then focus manually is a wonder.

I might quibble about the use of "cicada" for that little bug. Is that what they are called in Europe? What we call cicadas are large or larger - among the largest true bugs on our continent. From what I know about the life cycles of cicadas, I can't conceive of one being that small. Although I can't see the whole thing, I think we would call that one a leafhopper. Whatever you call it, it is still a great picture.
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Old Jun 4, 2009, 1:59 AM   #25
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Thanks Penolta,

the biggest problem is having enough light to see when they are in focus.
I'm using a 130watt light as extra lighting to find them, off course as soon as I get anywhere near them they start walking.
The rest is just - finding them (in the viewer) - hoping they haven't moved to far from the light so I can see what I'm focussing on, and then taking the shot.
Tried with a tripod, macro sled and all that stuff, but they are to fast (on their scale) for those contraptions so all shots are handheld.
The light also takes care of the to dark shadow cast by the flash.

I'm now trying to find out how I could use a ring light (not flash) as help to get them into focus.

The biggest cicada we have are about 2cm, smallest around 2mm.
Didn't really know what a leafhopper was, but when searching for it I just found that that designation is a better, and that it still is of the same family as cicadas.
"Leafhopper is a common name applied to any species from the family Cicadellidae. (wikipedia) "
This is a complete (2mm version) - (not to happy for the sharpnes of the eyes.)


Found some images of a complete lookalike on some local forums where they name these giants "Brown Cicades".

Cheers

Ronny
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Old Jun 4, 2009, 1:53 PM   #26
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Quote:
I'm now trying to find out how I could use a ring light (not flash) as help to get them into focus.
Ring lights are very convenients, but I don't know that you can find one powerful enough to freeze moving subjects as a flash can do.

Quote:
The biggest cicada we have are about 2cm, smallest around 2mm.
Didn't really know what a leafhopper was, but when searching for it I just found that that designation is a better, and that it still is of the same family as cicadas.
"Leafhopper is a common name applied to any species from the family Cicadellidae. (wikipedia) "
Therein lies the problem with common names - they often apply to different organisms in different areas. Both Cicadas and Leafhoppers are in the same Suborder (along with other families of similar bugs), but are in different families - Cicadidae (Cicadas) and Cicadellidae (Leafhoppers). There can always be exceptions, but the bugs in all the other families are small, while those Cicadas I have dimensions for can range from 27-57mm in length with wingspans from 76-10.8 cm. Pretty big bugs!

Here is a concise description of the family:

http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/cicada
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Old Jun 4, 2009, 7:23 PM   #27
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Just FYI, here is a photo of a periodic cicada from last year (taken with my old canon powershot), and a photo of a wasp called a "cicada killer," that catches & paralyzes cicadas to feed to its young! (also an old photo)
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