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Old Jun 28, 2009, 7:19 PM   #21
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Great series - shows much natural talent and skill in compostion. Especially like the light in the second one - really draws my eye into the subject and makes me dwell there awhile. Keep up the great work!
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Old Jun 30, 2009, 11:50 PM   #22
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Thanks for the tip. I plan to get a whole set of filters, since they're not very expensive. Which filter is it that makes waterfalls and rivers look so smooth? I can never remember.

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You might want to invest in a circular polarizing filter for the aquarium, so as to eliminate the reflection on the glass, and be able to get a better image. It works well on the surface of the water, so it should work well on glass reflections. I am sure that if this dosen't work, others will post... Also, with the filter, it will reduce the light getting through the lens, so you might have to go up in ISO speed, or reduce the shutter speed.

You do not have to break the bank on the filter, as there are some from Hoya, Tiffen, etc. that should work well, plus the kit lenses are sizes that are the most common.
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Old Jun 30, 2009, 11:55 PM   #23
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I was stationed in San Diego when I was in the Navy years and years ago. Loved it there! Hope to get back for a visit someday. Anyhoo, I hope I can get good shots when I go to the aquarium. Would a flash help? I also read that in difficult lighting situations, it's better to use MF, so that's probably what I'll be doing.

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I'm in Southern California, the other side of the country.

For your aquarium, you can try a polarizer, it would be great outdoors. But if it's indoors, like the Monterey Aquarium, you might lose too much light with one. I try to get as close to the glass as I can, which can also be a problem for focus if you are trying to take small jelly fish. Not a problem if the tank is big. I think I used a macro lens quite a bit when I was last at the one in Monterey. Lighting there is very dark, AF sometimes struggled, I had a relatively low keeper ratio, but I sure had fun and the ones that came out were very cool.

- Harriet
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 12:10 AM   #24
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If we keep at it and stay consistent, we will get where we want to be! Right now, all I'm working with is a semi-auto setting and the 2/3 rule. I'm from the school of "use what you've got", and that's all I "got" right now. What was your first DSLR and what have you worked your way up to now?

Thank you for the compliments!

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Well, you surprised me Lady Ro!
I thought you were going to confess to being a long time film photographer. I'm a long way from being where I'd like to be but, I'm learning. I just got my first DSLR about a year and a half ago.
I'd have to say you have a natural eye for composition and that goes a long way in learning this biz. I'm kind of like the guy that said, "I don't know a thing about art but, I know what I like... " Now if I can just learn how to get that to come through the lens!
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 12:22 AM   #25
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Thanks! Uhh... I thought blown out meant so bright as to not be able to see any detail? I see that the clouds are bright in some spots, but not so bright that you can't clearly see them or make out their shapes, etc. I guess I need to hurry up and get some books, LOL.

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It might be difficult as you have the blown out spots in the clouds. But, it would be worth a try.

Regarding photography books, I get a lot of mine from www.hamiltonbooks.com There's quite an assortment and reasonable prices. And, they are always quick to ship and postage is great. I've even ordered a few that said "shop worn" that were perfectly fine in my opinion. It's where I got my copy of Understanding Exposure. Harriet's right. It's a great book.

Patty
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 12:23 AM   #26
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Thanks!

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Great series - shows much natural talent and skill in compostion. Especially like the light in the second one - really draws my eye into the subject and makes me dwell there awhile. Keep up the great work!
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 12:23 AM   #27
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Thanks!

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All very good, well done.

Rodney
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 7:59 AM   #28
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Hi LadyRo,

I only said that because I had downloaded your image to play around with it to show you what I meant and whenever I lightened it up, the bright spots were just white. No detail. But, I've since changed the settings on my monitor. So, maybe it was just me.

Patty

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Thanks! Uhh... I thought blown out meant so bright as to not be able to see any detail? I see that the clouds are bright in some spots, but not so bright that you can't clearly see them or make out their shapes, etc. I guess I need to hurry up and get some books, LOL.
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 3:31 PM   #29
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A couple of things - flash will not help at an aquarium as the flash just gets reflected by the glass (and many aquariums don't like you using them as they can disturb the fish). MF is a good idea, but try AF and see if it will work (depends on the amount of light and other conditions).

There's 2 or 3 filters that are really useful - a polarizer to stop reflected light (possibly good for aquariums), a neutral density is the one that cuts all light (makes things darker) so you can use longer shutter speeds in bright light - gives you the silky smooth waterfalls. Also a graduated neutral density filter - that's darker at one end, then gradually gets lighter until it's clear at the other end. Good for sunsets where you still want to show detail on the ground. Most other filter effects can be created in a graphics program like Photoshop etc.
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Old Jul 1, 2009, 4:59 PM   #30
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If we keep at it and stay consistent, we will get where we want to be! Right now, all I'm working with is a semi-auto setting and the 2/3 rule. I'm from the school of "use what you've got", and that's all I "got" right now. What was your first DSLR and what have you worked your way up to now?

Thank you for the compliments!
My first DSLR was a Samsung GX10, twin to the Pentax K10. long story but, I had some real issues with the GX10. Finally (after going through 3 bodies) I got my money back and got the Pentax K20, then a short time later purchased a used K10 for my wife. they're both good cameras!
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