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Old Jul 13, 2009, 7:18 PM   #11
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Those are great photos, penolta!

Thanks for sharing,

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 13, 2009, 7:30 PM   #12
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Nice ones, penolta.

Patty
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Old Jul 14, 2009, 6:29 PM   #13
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Thanks Sara and Patty, for looking and commenting
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Old Jul 16, 2009, 12:27 AM   #14
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a good series
educational
the rear lit monarch is a beauty

we get monarchs over here, they were introduced
so were the weeds they use
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Old Jul 16, 2009, 4:12 PM   #15
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Thank you John. I wonder if the introduced Monarchs were from a migratory or nonmigrtory population. In North America, only the Monarchs East of the Rocky Mountains migrate to and from Mexico - those to the West are more likely to be resident year round. I ask because sometimes introductions go awry because of inadequate preparation or poor understanding of the species. One time a State wildlife agency released European Migratory Quail into the East Coast of the United States. Normally these Quail in Europe migrate from the Northwest to the Southeast, so when it came time for the introduced quail to migrate, they took off and flew out to sea over the Atlantic and disappeared forever!

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Old Jul 16, 2009, 10:55 PM   #16
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Penolta - thanks for the suggestions for shooting butterflies, I haven't had an opportunity to try them out yet. Hopefully this weekend.

I didn't realize that the local monarchs don't migrate - I always thought they did. And your story about the quail is really interesting. It does seem like someone would have thought about that before importing them, but I guess it's easy to overlook some otherwise obvious facts by getting caught up in other facts.
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 12:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
I guess it's easy to overlook some otherwise obvious facts by getting caught up in other facts.
Harriet, it happens more often than you would realize. The Chukar partridge, an Old World game bird, was introduced into California and elsewhere in the arid Mountain West to provide a new game bird for hunters, but you probably have never seen one, even though there should be some around where you live, because they are so secretive and even nocturnal - less easily found and thus poorer game birds here than in their native habitat, and they compete with the native Mountain Quail, which have suffered from it. Starlings were introduced to control insect pests like Gypsy Moths and Japanese Beetles, but they found other things they liked better, and became another pest themselves. And The English(or House} Sparrows were also introduced, but that is another story, and so it goes.

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Old Jul 18, 2009, 7:01 AM   #18
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ummm we have the ones with orange wings and white spotted bodies
they even use them for release at weddings

as far as i know they dont compete with local butterflies as they only use milkweed which is also introduced
habitat loss and land clearing is far more damaging
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 11:32 AM   #19
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John, the milkweed butterflies are restricted to Milkweeds for breeding. If there are no native milkweeds there, there will be no native butterflies with those requirements for the Monarchs to compete with for caterpillar food. There is always room for the Law of Unintended Consequences to be invoked, but in this case I think you are safe.
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