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Old Jul 17, 2009, 2:15 PM   #11
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Great shots Ira,
I didn't realize Merc made a pick up but, I was pretty young back in the early 50's
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 6:06 PM   #12
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Default Mercury Pickup

I too did not know there was any Mercury pickup truck. Was it perhaps made in Canada. I do know that the Mercury cars that year had a great V8 engine. I bought a used one which had suffered a frozen and cracked block. I wanted it for the crankshaft which had about 3/8 inch more stroke than the Ford car engines of that time. I put that crank into a 46 Ford block, planed the flat heads, bored the cylinders to the max, installed oversize, high-rise pistons and roller-actuated valve lifters. The result was an engine with about 11:1 compression ratio, maybe 250 horsepwer. I installed it in a light-weight 1929 Ford roadster set on a 32 Ford frame and chassis. That was my hot rod. I loved that car, but gave it up after a small ignition fire occurred at about 90 MPH under the dashboard. Usually that would have been only a small problem, but, as you old-timers know, the Ford Model A cars all had their gas tank right behind the dashboard, and a fire there was sort of dangerous. Scared the hell out of me. My first-born was due shortly, and after wise council with my preggy wife, I sold the car. The guy who bought it paid me $400 just to get the engine. He put it in a dirt-track stock car and won some races with it. I have some old black and white phtos of the hot rod that I will try to find to show later. That was the only car I ever owned that would lay down a streak of rubber for fifty feet or so. This writing has nothing to do with photography. The Mercury emblem in somebody elses photo just got my juices stirring.
LOL,
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 9:25 PM   #13
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Ira - thanks for the amazing shots - such attention to detail...
And Old Engineer - thanks for sharing the memories!
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 9:40 PM   #14
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Faced with the same situation, I would have stepped back and taken pictures of the entire car. Which means, of course, that I would have come away with thoroughly mediocre shots of nice cars. One of the things I like so much about this forum is that most of you see things that I usually overlook. Ira, your ability to frame and focus on just one detail is wonderful, and it's a great reminder to me that sometimes the best shot involves stepping in and getting closer, not zooming out.
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 10:33 PM   #15
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Great series. I had never heard of a Mercury pickup, so I appreciate your enlightening us on that.

Paul
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Old Jul 17, 2009, 10:57 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Old Engineer View Post
I too did not know there was any Mercury pickup truck. Was it perhaps made in Canada.

They were made in Canada and sold at the Canadian Mercury dealers from about the 'late '40's to 1968 or so when they were discontinued. After that Canadian Merc dealers sold Ford trucks. My family bought a new (1968 Mercury M250 (3/4 ton) as a work truck for their business. It had the 300 inline truck six, 3 spd. std...painted a hideous yellow, but it was a great work truck.
Canadian Dodge dealers sold Dodge trucks, Canadian Plymouth dealers sold Fargo trucks (same as Dodge- different badging)...this arrangement lasted till the '70's or so. Canadian Pontiac dealers sold Pontiac bodies on Chevy chassis' and powertrains. Cdn. Pontiacs had Chevy engines (283, 327, 409, etc. ). This arrangement lasted well into the '80's.

I do know that the Mercury cars that year had a great V8 engine. I bought a used one which had suffered a frozen and cracked block. I wanted it for the crankshaft which had about 3/8 inch more stroke than the Ford car engines of that time. I put that crank into a 46 Ford block, planed the flat heads, bored the cylinders to the max, installed oversize, high-rise pistons and roller-actuated valve lifters. The result was an engine with about 11:1 compression ratio, maybe 250 horsepwer.

Excellent power for the old Flathead V8.

I installed it in a light-weight 1929 Ford roadster set on a 32 Ford frame and chassis. That was my hot rod. I loved that car, but gave it up after a small ignition fire occurred at about 90 MPH under the dashboard. Usually that would have been only a small problem, but, as you old-timers know, the Ford Model A cars all had their gas tank right behind the dashboard, and a fire there was sort of dangerous. Scared the hell out of me. My first-born was due shortly, and after wise council with my preggy wife, I sold the car. The guy who bought it paid me $400 just to get the engine. He put it in a dirt-track stock car and won some races with it. I have some old black and white phtos of the hot rod that I will try to find to show later. That was the only car I ever owned that would lay down a streak of rubber for fifty feet or so. This writing has nothing to do with photography. The Mercury emblem in somebody elses photo just got my juices stirring.
LOL,
Old Engineer.
Great stories. If you're ever up in Canada in a larger city during the summer, bring your camera and a wide angle zoom. There are a lot of outdoor car shows (vintage, hot rod, etc.) and you will see plenty of fascinating vehicles...including some models as detailed, that were marketed in Canada only. A couple of weekends ago I saw a '70's Fargo pickup with a 440 B series big block...stock from the factory.

Last edited by lesmore49; Jul 17, 2009 at 11:07 PM.
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 2:20 AM   #17
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Ira, I'm entertained but not surprised. Clean, "simple" detail photos are where you excel - as you show in this thread also. And yes, the FA50mm is fun to use. What about the FA35?

Kjell
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 11:27 AM   #18
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Ira, I'm entertained but not surprised. Clean, "simple" detail photos are where you excel - as you show in this thread also. And yes, the FA50mm is fun to use. What about the FA35?

Kjell
The FA35 is actually sharper wide open but mine doesn't focus well on the K10D (this camera has some focusing "issues"). Annette now uses it as her fast lens on her K100D Super. I use the DA10-17 on the *istDL because it also doesn't get along with the K10D (the only lenses I regularly trust on the K10D are the FA50, the FA28-70f4 and the DA14).

Thanks everyone for the comments, and the stories, I have often commented here that I didn't really feel that I had found a style or focus for my photography but I think it is now coming clearer. Details like these and wide angle shots seem to produce results that I like (and other do as well it seems).

Ira
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 11:33 AM   #19
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The FA35 is actually sharper wide open but mine doesn't focus well on the K10D (this camera has some focusing "issues"). Annette now uses it as her fast lens on her K100D Super. I use the DA10-17 on the *istDL because it also doesn't get along with the K10D (the only lenses I regularly trust on the K10D are the FA50, the FA28-70f4 and the DA14).I have a K10D and so far (touch wood) no focus issues. I take a lot of pictures of vintage cars, hot rods, etc...I primarily use my Pentax 16-45 and 50 F1.4...great results. I also have a KM and I'm pleased with the kit 18-55...also use the 50 f1.4 on the KM.

Thanks everyone for the comments, and the stories, I have often commented here that I didn't really feel that I had found a style or focus for my photography but I think it is now coming clearer. Details like these and wide angle shots seem to produce results that I like (and other do as well it seems).

Ira
Same here...I like the effect of the wide angle lens on the cars...I also get down on my old knees for lower perspectives of the cars.
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