Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 8, 2009, 11:37 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Trojansoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Hot Springs, AR
Posts: 3,724
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
I've found that having a camera has totally changed the way I look at things around me. It's fun to take the time to spot the unusual in the usual.
A profound statement, and one I suspect with which all of us would agree. The camera definitely opens a more detailed level of perception of the world around us.

I love this series of shots, particularly the tufa formations. Nice detail in what looks like it would be tough lighting. I agree with the characterizations of animals.

Paul
Trojansoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2009, 11:43 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Thanks for the compliment, Paul.

I'm surprised no one has attempted to identify the (more or less) black bird. It had mottled red markings on its head and neck (you can tell how little I know about birds). I looked through my guide but didn't see anything that grabbed me as being a match. My problem with the field guide is that I have no idea where to start looking. Some day I wish they'd reorganize them so you could start with "black, smallish/robin sized" and go from there.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2009, 5:33 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default Sorry, wrong end :shakehead:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
I'm surprised no one has attempted to identify the (more or less) black bird.
I'm not. Birds have color patterns on their heads and breasts so they can tell who's who when they are facing each other, so "heads you win, tails you lose."

I might have had a guess when I thought the colors were accurate, but when you say "red," all bets are off - I haven't a clue. However, the bird has a band on the left leg, so if you had that 600mm lens and an AF TC and could have read the number . . . .

BTW there are such books as you describe - you can find them in most bookstores. There may even be an online color key somewhere if you search.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 12:08 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Would this picture help, Penolta? It's more orange than red. Sorry about the quality of the picture, I know it's not very good, but it's the best one I have showing the head.

mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 2:58 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
rhermans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Antwerp - Belgium
Posts: 3,454
Default

Magnificent shots of a beautiful site and yes the Koala looks like a koala

Ronny
__________________
rhermans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 9:23 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Would this picture help, Penolta? It's more orange than red. Sorry about the quality of the picture, I know it's not very good, but it's the best one I have showing the head.
Good enough for identification - it is an immature Yellow-headed Blackbird in molt, which would have been my first guess. Next Spring the brownish yellow feathers will be a bright pure yellow.

It has been a few year since I have been there - I took quite a few pictures (on film) of tufa formations, but few turned out quite as I had envisioned them - if we had digitals to preview then, I might have gotten images I would have been more satisfied with. I was traveling light with only a 28-200 zoom, and the lighting wasn't the best, either.

It looks like there is also a larger gopher-like tufa "critter" facing left in your first shot, center-left in the cutout, and a smaller foxy face near the top of the dark prominence to the right (both even have eyes in the right place!).:

Name:  tufacritter.jpg
Views: 91
Size:  38.9 KB

Last edited by penolta; Sep 10, 2009 at 9:44 AM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 10:47 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Thanks for the ID on the bird - I guess a guide organized by color/size would not have helped. The poor bird does look rather scruffy so the molting doesn't surprise me, but I never would have guessed those feathers would be yellow next year!

I know what you mean about taking pictures at Mono Lake. The only other time I've been there was in very early spring and mid-morning. That worked out well as there was still quite a bit of snow on the Sierras and provided a beautiful backdrop, with the sun illuminating the tufa correctly. This time there was quite a bit of either high clouds (or smoke from the Station Fire, or a combination of both) which helped as it diffused the light somewhat. However, it was afternoon (mid to late) and many of the formations were back-lit enough that it was hard to shoot. Like many places (other than Devils Postpile), shooting in the early morning would be best, I think.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 11:08 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
hiro1963's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 262
Default

Great shots! Those Alkali flies freak me out a bit lol...


Have a good one!

- Hiro
hiro1963 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 12:48 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Thanks for the ID on the bird - I guess a guide organized by color/size would not have helped. The poor bird does look rather scruffy so the molting doesn't surprise me, but I never would have guessed those feathers would be yellow next year!
Careless wording on my part. This bird is molting into its first Winter plumage. While some birds feathers change color in Spring through wear (English Sparrow's black bib and House Finch's red head for example) for this bird there will be another molt in Spring in which these brownish feathers will be replaced with yellow ones.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2009, 2:32 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

The problem wasn't you - I did understand about molting and adult vs. immature feathers - it was more my way of expressing myself, how I find it amazing that a bird can change its look so much as it grows up and changes "coats", so to speak. I tend to think of things in terms of dogs and horses, and I was always amazed how a grey horse (what many people call "white" but is not) starts off life with a very dark coat.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 PM.