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Old Sep 9, 2009, 10:44 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by NonEntity1 View Post
Great series Harriet. I love photos of ghost towns, one of the few photo books I own is on that subject. Traveling and photographing ghost towns would be a wonderful retirement project. I really like these shots you have here.
Harriot

I have to agree with Tim. Fantastic shots!!!!!

Phil
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 12:19 AM   #12
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Thanks for the compliments. There are fewer and fewer ghost towns with anything left in them. There used to be a few in the Mojave desert that weren't protected and gradually over the years they either weathered away or suffered vandalism and destruction by people taking away things. I'm glad that Bodie, at least, has been spared.

GW - I think that most places in the world have interesting spots to visit. California has perhaps more than some and certainly lots of variety but it's by no means unique. And there are people who probably would disagree with you - those who see California as being only the beach, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Like any place else, one has to seek out those interesting, out-of-the-way places, like Bodie and one other thread/locale from this trip.
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 3:02 AM   #13
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Great reportage stuff.
It's always a shame that governments can't see longer than their nose when it comes to cultural heritage of nature reserves.
Glad this didn't happen with this town.

Ronny
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 7:19 AM   #14
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Harriet - beautifully-captured series of this amazing site! (Of course, I like the Ranger photo the best...) Some great work, especially considering the working conditions. You tell the story of this historic park so well - perhaps you could use your photos to "wake up the public" to the need to continue funding this park. Is there a "Friends of the Park" group that might be able to use your photos? Just a thought...
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 7:38 AM   #15
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Great series of photos Harriet.
Thanks
bb2
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 8:31 AM   #16
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Such a duet of 12-24 and 55-300! I've been tossed from melancholy to a haunted feel...Ah, it's just looking at things left behind, they had left there as if they would return some day. But you explain that it was expensive to move furniture due to the remoteness and altitude. Btw, could it be that the peering lady in #1 is yourself shot by some 'wireless assistant' ? : )
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Old Sep 10, 2009, 11:14 AM   #17
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Thanks for the compliments, Ronny and bb2.

mole - I'm sure there's some sort of organization that helps support Bodie - there's a small museum/gift shop there that's run by docent/student/volunteers in the summer. I don't know if they'd be interested in any of my shots - the town has been very well photographed over the years.

bahadir - The first picture was, indeed, taken by my husband using the K20 and the DA 55-300 (which he used all weekend) and shows my own short, slight frame - I'm sure there were those who thought I was crazy to be carrying so much photo grear (and it wasn't everything - the tripod got left in the car).

The second picture was taken by me using the K7 and the DA*50-135, a lens that worked extremely well here. The DA*16-50 would have been a great lens for this location, I think, and I often thought I would have liked to have had something between 24 and 50. As it was, the 12-24 got a real work-out. I also used the DA*200, and while it was somewhat useful in places, it was mostly too long.


The 10-17 fisheye doesn't work here - the glass protrudes out a bit and there's no real threads for a filter or lens hood to protect it. So you can't get it right up to the glass and have the hood or threads block out the glare/reflection of the glass.

Harriet
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Old Sep 11, 2009, 3:16 PM   #18
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Just simply bloody amazing. Both the place and your photos.

Kjell
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Old Sep 11, 2009, 5:34 PM   #19
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Yes very nice series I have always liked the wild west look and you did a great job of showing them
now you say it is a ghost town, like what kind of strange things happen there? and you were looking through the window are you not allowed to walk in?
great shots
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Old Sep 11, 2009, 7:04 PM   #20
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More great photos. There are very few ghost towns here in the northeast -- just a few I can think of that were cut off from easy access when a dam was built. Unfortunately, our humid climate is very tough on unmaintained wood structures, so unless some organization actively maintains the buildings, everything except for the stonework tends to disappear in 50-70 years.

I love how many of these buildings look like they haven't deteriorated in more than a century. (The gas station, while clearly very old, is almost certainly not a century old; I'd guess 75 years at most.) Do you suppose I could be preserved in a state of "arrested decay"?
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