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Old Sep 11, 2009, 5:56 PM   #11
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Wonderful shots Harriet. They're phenomenal. I remember back in the 1970s, when I was studying geology, one of my professors went into quite a bit of detail about bristlecone pines, since by studying the tree rings they could gather a tremendous amount of information about the climate for the past 10,000 years. As it happens, the last great ice age ended about 12,000 years ago, so scientists could learn a great deal about how the northern hemisphere recovered from the glaciers covered a huge percentage of the landmass.

Ever since that lecture (more than 30 years ago!) I have always wanted to see bristlecone pines. Thank you for bringing me along on your trip.
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Old Sep 11, 2009, 11:07 PM   #12
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Thanks again, everyone.

Roy, I am very aware of what a great place California can be. There's quite a few Californians who think that the state consists of Los Angeles and San Francisco. Many of them don't care to know anything more and so miss out on so much. I'm always finding interesting places to visit. For instance, I first heard about this location and its visitor center when driving up to visit Lake Tahoe. I saw a sign, then looked at a map to see where it was. I later looked on the internet for information and quickly got fascinated by it.

mtnman - while it is out-of-the-way, it's easy to find as long as you have a car. It's well worth visiting.

Lou - none of these pictures are HDR. I did several, including one very similar to #5. But I liked the focal length better in Dan's picture than in my HDR, which was taken with a longer lens and didn't show as much of the tree.
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Old Sep 11, 2009, 11:44 PM   #13
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Harriet, of all the places you have shown so well on this trip, this is the only place I have never actually been. You and Dan have done a really nice job with the old, damaged survivors of years and years of exposure to the harsh elements, and those that finally succumbed, but I have a feeling that folks will get an idea that all of the trees are so badly beaten up. Other than the distant grove and the pine cones, have you a picture of a younger undamaged tree that is growing in a less exposed location (if there is one, that is) so we can see what a "healthy" specimen looks like?
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Old Sep 12, 2009, 3:56 AM   #14
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magnificent trees, never knew they could become this old.
And the way you've made this reportage is as magnificent.
Great work
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Old Sep 12, 2009, 4:57 PM   #15
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Thanks for a great tour of our elders! Beautifully captured series, with such amazing detail, color and composition. Thanks!
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Old Sep 12, 2009, 9:31 PM   #16
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Thanks Ronny and mole.

penolta - here's a couple of pictures that show less gnarl and more ordinary trees.





The first one was taken with the K7, DA*50-135 and polarizer. Second one with the K20 and DA 55-300.
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Old Sep 12, 2009, 10:55 PM   #17
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great series, and informative too!

love #5,#6
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Old Sep 13, 2009, 11:14 PM   #18
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what a treat
i love gnarly old trees
natural sculptures
these sure are amazing
and i sure can relate to the 1 hour taking 2 lol

and lack of appreciation is not confined to over there either
we have the same thing here
one thing i like about photography is you can learn heaps about your subjects too
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