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Old Nov 10, 2009, 10:16 AM   #1
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Default Sensor dust, and lens swap

Well, so far I just love my new K7. Problem is this is my first DSLR, and I have become absolutely paranoid about changing lens. I ran the the dust check routine and have noticed some dust spots on the sensor already. Seems like everytime I run the check the pattern is different. What is the best way to swap out lens, and are a few dust particles normal. Should these be dealt with, and how?
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 11:17 AM   #2
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By far the biggest disadvantage with dSRL - at least with film, the dust problem was virtually non existant apart from the rare & occaisional scratch if caught between the felt on the film chamber.

My advise for what it's worth is to use a 'Rocket Blower'. Flip the mirrow up via the menu, remove the lens & with the camera held upside down, apply 'blasts' of air from the 'Rocket Blower' to dislodge loose dust from the area of the sensor which, by gravity, should then drop out.

Run a test shot by pointing to an area of blue sky and check the result in a graphic program to see the results.

Personally, I put up with a few spots near the edge of the frame which can be easily re-touched in Photoshop.

Persistant dust i.e. pollen spots are more difficult to remove & require the use of a sensor cleaning kit - the only time I tried this, I made matters worse & after 4 attempts managed to get it back to somewhere near to what it was before I started.

My local photo shop offer a cleaning service which isn't cheat at UKú50 but they do guarentee to remove all dust spots although they do say that persistant specks at the edge of the frame might have to stay.

Last edited by IntrepidWalker; Nov 10, 2009 at 11:27 AM.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 12:07 PM   #3
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i would stop stressing about it to be honest. if it gets bad enough that your actual photos show something, then clean it. until then, forget about it.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 12:22 PM   #4
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I don't change lenses a lot because I usually know which lens I want to shoot with before I go out, so it really hasn't been a cause of great concern for me. I don't worry too much about it. I try to keep from pointing the camera body up and try to get the other lens on as quickly as possible, while still being careful. If it becomes a problem at some point, I'll have it cleaned.

Jerry
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 12:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tony3dd View Post
Well, so far I just love my new K7. Problem is this is my first DSLR, and I have become absolutely paranoid about changing lens. I ran the the dust check routine and have noticed some dust spots on the sensor already. Seems like everytime I run the check the pattern is different. What is the best way to swap out lens, and are a few dust particles normal. Should these be dealt with, and how?
Hi tony,

The advise given has been good.

One thing with the dust detect function is that you need to have the camera pointed at a featureless area (blank white wall is best) to get accurate results (been there, done that -- and was mortified when it looked like I emptied a vacuum cleaner bag into my camera). Any light sources or contrast areas in the frame will show up as strange "dust" swirls and blobs in dust detect mode, and a perfectly clean sensor will look like it's a mess.

The dust removal function of the K-7 works the best of all of the K's (most users find that two or three applications in a row usually shakes off any dust), and the coating on the sensor is very resistant to dust -- I've gotten to be very blase about changing lenses compared to my DS, which in the winter was a nightmare for me because of the static potential of the dryer air.

I've only had one instance where I needed to use a Rocket blower on my K-7 sensor, and I'm constantly change lenses.

Scott
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 12:39 PM   #6
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I've got a K10D that I've had for a couple of years. Before I got it I was worried about dust on the sensor.

But I just leave the sensor cleaner on at all times...feel a little shake every time I start the camera up.

I usually change lenses quickly in a car or a building, but also change out of doors, avoiding if I can blowing dust storms.

What I do, is put the lens on a solid surface, loosen the bottom cap, but keep the cap sitting on the lens.

I then take off the lens on the camera, put it beside the other lens, take off the cap and put it loosely on the lens I just took off.

While I'm doing this I have my K10D hanging from the neckstrap (around my neck) and turn my camera downward so dust has a more difficult time getting in.

I quickly take the other lens I want on ...align red dots...it's on.

Then I tighten the rear cap on the other lens and put in my bag.

So far I haven't seen any dust problem that I need to actually get in there and manually clean it off. The dust removal system seems to work well.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 1:35 PM   #7
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i find the best thing to do dust check with is the white opaque body lens cap that came with the k7 slap it on point at a light and do the dust check - as like you the first time i did it i was horrified that half my sensor appeared to be covered in dust - little checking later and then hit on this idea rechecked and sensor is 100% clean =)
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 2:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tony3dd View Post
Well, so far I just love my new K7. Problem is this is my first DSLR, and I have become absolutely paranoid about changing lens. I ran the the dust check routine and have noticed some dust spots on the sensor already. Seems like everytime I run the check the pattern is different. What is the best way to swap out lens, and are a few dust particles normal. Should these be dealt with, and how?
I posted this link in another section of this site but the information may be of some help in terms of cleaning methods.

http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/index.html

Regards
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 3:13 PM   #9
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Ok I found out I was not operating the dust alert correctly. I didn't know you had to point it at a white or solid color surface. Now it's only showing one small speck, which doesn't seem to cause a problem a at all. I will follow the guild line you all set forth.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 9:52 PM   #10
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When I bought my first dSLR camera, someone described a two-handed method for changing lenses. It takes a bit of practice, but works quite well and really cuts down the amount of time your camera is exposed. I hike a lot and never hesitate to change lenses when I want to. I'm always changing lenses.

What you do is get the new lens ready, with the rear cap already off. Have it in your right hand next to the camera, then use a finger to push the button to release the lens on the camera. Have it in your left hand and use it to rotate the lens, slipping it off and immediately slip on the new lens (held in your right hand) onto the camera, rotating it to lock it in place. The camera pretty much has a lens in front of it the whole time.

Some additional things to think about when changing lenses - always pay attention to which way the wind is blowing and face downwind (otherwise gunk can get blown into the camera - I speak from experience on this one!). If your camera happens to be on a tripod, try to have the camera pointing down so anything that might get in will fall out, not into the camera. That's not bad advice anytime, but it's too awkward to do if using my two-handed method.

A rocket blower is a good idea. I haven't used mine on the K-7 yet, and found I rarely use it on the K20. I did/do use it more often with the K100, but a lot less since I started using the two-handed method for changing lenses.
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