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Old Dec 26, 2009, 1:06 AM   #1
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Default Ducks and Geese

Earlier posts today focused on Trumpeter Swans, but the swans don't come alone. With the swans each year come a large flock of Ring-Necked ducks. These ducks generally hang around the periphery of the Trumpeter Swans, hoping for left-over goodies from the folks who come to throw corn




Far fewer in number are the Buffleheads




There are a few Mallards, but they tend to stay near wooded areas along the banks, are are easily scared into flight




35 degrees trumped waiting at the swan pond to see further action, but on the way back to town, my attention was grabbed by an unusual-looking goose in a different pond along the road side. I handed my K-7 to my youngest son. Highlights are blown....but a unique looking goose



These are China Geese, identifiable by the large protuberance above their bill.



China Geese are identified as a domestic goose, prized for their relatively lean meat and their high rate of egg laying. I just thought they looked kind of cool.

Paul
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 12:54 PM   #2
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More great shots............ You're on a roll.

It's nice you have so many wonderful opportunities to capture these beautiful waterfowl.

Lou
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 8:02 PM   #3
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Very nice shots! I see buffleheads fairly often, but never close enough to get pictures like these. These are very nice, and I really like the ringneck ducks. Looks like you've had some good birding days.
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 8:37 PM   #4
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Very nice shots! I see buffleheads fairly often, but never close enough to get pictures like these. These are very nice, and I really like the ring-neck ducks. Looks like you've had some good birding days.
Harriet, I know exactly what you mean. I can't get anywhere close to the buffleheads that hang around the fish hatchery where I normally shoot. The ring-necks and the buffleheads have learned that if they hang around the edges of the swans opportunities will come for them to dash in and get a few kernels of corn that the swans miss. There is a four foot chicken wire fence that keeps visitors at this pond from getting down to the water, and the birds have learned they aren't subject to being chased.

Lou, I try to get out to this pond any time I visit my mother... to the point that she claims I'm coming to see the birds instead of her.

The gentleman who owns the tract of land on which the pond is located has plans to try to reintroduce several native species that have died out in that part of Arkansas as a part of a full-fledged game preserve. I'm really happy to see the development and am going to be watching it very closely over the next few years.

Paul
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 9:49 PM   #5
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35 degrees trumped waiting at the swan pond to see further action, but on the way back to town, my attention was grabbed by an unusual-looking goose in a different pond along the road side. I handed my K-7 to my youngest son. Highlights are blown....but a unique looking goose



These are China Geese, identifiable by the large protuberance above their bill.



China Geese are identified as a domestic goose, prized for their relatively lean meat and their high rate of egg laying. I just thought they looked kind of cool.

Paul[/QUOTE]


Hey Paul,
great pix! Nice job on all accounts. The first Ring neck is really sharp with good detail, hard to do on these guys. The second Bufflehrads, the one in the lower portion is a great capture!
The geese you call China geese are actually brown African geese. the orgin of which have nothing to do with africa and some experts believe they may have originated in China. in the US. we have the brown, or (gray) and the white African goose.

Again, nice job!
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 10:30 PM   #6
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The geese you call China geese are actually brown African geese. the orgin of which have nothing to do with africa and some experts believe they may have originated in China. in the US. we have the brown, or (gray) and the white African goose.

Again, nice job!
GW, you may be right. There was certainly no one around to ask. However, from what I read trying to identify them, the Brown and the White China geese are almost identical with the Brown and White African geese, their very close cousins. Both are descended from the wild Swan goose, a Chinese goose. Both are bred and sold in the U.S. The African goose is slightly larger. I went with the China ID because the pictures I saw of the China geese showed them with a slightly more dominant knob, but the two species are so similar they're hard to tell apart.

Paul
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Old Dec 26, 2009, 11:15 PM   #7
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GW, you may be right. There was certainly no one around to ask. However, from what I read trying to identify them, the Brown and the White China geese are almost identical with the Brown and White African geese, their very close cousins. Both are descended from the wild Swan goose, a Chinese goose. Both are bred and sold in the U.S. The African goose is slightly larger. I went with the China ID because the pictures I saw of the China geese showed them with a slightly more dominant knob, but the two species are so similar they're hard to tell apart.

Paul
I stand corrected sir. The most obvious difference is the dewlap under the chin on the African goose. I should have been more certain of my facts before jumping to conclusions, Sorry.
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