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Old Jan 12, 2010, 1:15 AM   #11
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Thanks for the link...I am afraid of the swab...will have to work up to it, if other methods fail.
its only scary the first time. once you do it, you will say "what was i afraid of, that was easy"

but do try the rocket blower first, it will probably do the trick.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 1:34 AM   #12
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The air blower I have is one of those rubber ball types, that you squeeze the rubber bulb and a puff of air comes out the nozzle end. The brush is easily slipped off the end. Is that the kind you're talking about to use ?

I will hold the camera downward...thanks for mentioning as I didn't think about that. Makes sense though.

Thanks, Les
Hi Les,

One more thing to mention, The Giottos Rocket Blower has a one-way valve, so it doesn't suck air in through the nozzle and then blow it back out, it sucks air in through the bulb, then blows it out of the nozzle. This is the best type of bulb blower for this purpose. The last thing I want to do is blow off the dust, then suck it up and blow it back on the sensor.

Also, there might be dust or other particles in the bulb, so it's a good idea to at least squeeze the bulb a couple of times before using it to try to blow off the sensor.

I've had DSLRs for over 5 years, and haven't had to wet clean a sensor yet (fingers crossed). I'm especially careful about changing lenses in the winter too -- the dryness of the air causes more static buildup and more dust seems to stick to the sensor.

Scott
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 1:14 PM   #13
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Thanks to all who contributed suggestions.

You...collectively...are good...real good.

I used one of my blowers....actually one from the '70's as my new one had some loose molding stuff on the nozzle.

Did it twice and the offending dust spots are gonzo.

Thank you again.

I know the manual gives a step by step...but I find when I ask a question I get a lot more info about what to look out for, cautions, good advice.

BTW I did hold the camera body down as per Mtngal's suggestion.....the manual doesn't mention this..but it makes sense...use gravity to let the dust fall downward...towards the ground instead of back to the sensor.

Again, thanks to all and I might eventually try the swab routine...actually if i need to do this again, I just might ask my wife to do this procedure...her fine motor control is excellent and something to behold...much better then mine.

Last edited by lesmore49; Jan 12, 2010 at 1:22 PM.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 1:19 PM   #14
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Hi Les,

One more thing to mention, The Giottos Rocket Blower has a one-way valve, so it doesn't suck air in through the nozzle and then blow it back out, it sucks air in through the bulb, then blows it out of the nozzle. This is the best type of bulb blower for this purpose. The last thing I want to do is blow off the dust, then suck it up and blow it back on the sensor.

Also, there might be dust or other particles in the bulb, so it's a good idea to at least squeeze the bulb a couple of times before using it to try to blow off the sensor.

I've had DSLRs for over 5 years, and haven't had to wet clean a sensor yet (fingers crossed). I'm especially careful about changing lenses in the winter too -- the dryness of the air causes more static buildup and more dust seems to stick to the sensor.

Scott
Thanks for the hint...I checked the nozzle...actually used the best air blower (other one had molding pieces on it) and puffed the air out of it a number of times to make sure it was blowing clean air.

That static thing makes me think...I live in a very dry climate (Prairies) and ever so often we have a static problem...never thought about that.

I do change my lenses quite a bit and usually have the camera upside down...but I think this camera position needs to be mandatory.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 3:17 PM   #15
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As far as changing lenses, having the camera facing down is very good, but isn't strictly necessary, depending on your method of changing lenses. I change lenses outside all the time and have developed a good method that only exposes the camera body for an instant. Basically, you get the new lens all ready to mount, with the lens comfortably in your right hand with the dot lined up with the proper spot on the camera. Then use a finger to push the button, loosen the old lens with your left hand, and then make sure the lens in the right hand is ready to go on. Remove the old lens with the left hand as you are putting the new one on with your right hand. I do this with the camera around my neck, so the hole is facing out, not down. But it's not really exposed as you put the new one over it as you remove the old one. It seems awkward at first and takes practice, but now I don't worry about changing lenses in anything but wet or extreme dusty conditions. Normally I'll just turn my back into the wind (always face downwind) and change lenses as I want. I still haven't had a need to use anything but an air blower occasionally to knock off any dust.

Interesting about winter and being dry. But then, it's always dry where I live, most of the time the humidity is below 30% and usually around 20% and often below that Static electricity is always a problem, so I wouldn't notice a seasonal change. I don't worry about fungus much...
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 5:29 PM   #16
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As far as changing lenses, having the camera facing down is very good, but isn't strictly necessary, depending on your method of changing lenses. I change lenses outside all the time and have developed a good method that only exposes the camera body for an instant. Basically, you get the new lens all ready to mount, with the lens comfortably in your right hand with the dot lined up with the proper spot on the camera. Then use a finger to push the button, loosen the old lens with your left hand, and then make sure the lens in the right hand is ready to go on. Remove the old lens with the left hand as you are putting the new one on with your right hand. I do this with the camera around my neck, so the hole is facing out, not down. But it's not really exposed as you put the new one over it as you remove the old one. It seems awkward at first and takes practice, but now I don't worry about changing lenses in anything but wet or extreme dusty conditions. Normally I'll just turn my back into the wind (always face downwind) and change lenses as I want. I still haven't had a need to use anything but an air blower occasionally to knock off any dust.

Interesting about winter and being dry. But then, it's always dry where I live, most of the time the humidity is below 30% and usually around 20% and often below that Static electricity is always a problem, so I wouldn't notice a seasonal change. I don't worry about fungus much...

Thanks Mtngal for the detailed description of your lens changing procedure. I will give it a try.

I just came back from an afternoon walk through my favourite forest, taking the K10D and my 55-300mm.

Lot's of snow...but low humidity. Think this is something to do with the fact that I live on the prairies...lot's of grassland, but as I'm on the edge of the great plains and there are a lot of forested areas nearby...best of both worlds.

I took a number of winter scenic photos...loaded them up on the computer and boy ...I can't say for sure...but the screen seems very clean and clear. Could be, as this is the first time I've ever blown the dust off the sensor.

It's almost as if this sensor cleaning process could be a regular maintenance item.

I'm sure dust has accumulated on the sensor in my K10D's case. Two + years, many thousands of exposures and many lens changings will do it I guess, no matter how careful one is.
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