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Old Jan 23, 2010, 9:22 AM   #1
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Default Pentax K-x questions

Hi all. I am considering buying a DSLR in a few months time, one of the cameras I am interested in is the K-x.
I have a few old film SLR lenses, how difficult would it be to manually focus them on a K-x?
What is battery life like with NiMH and Eneloop batteries?
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 9:30 AM   #2
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Hello,

All you need to do is switch the lens switch to manual and you will be set. It is easy to do manual focus.

Eneloops are nimh, the difference is the eneloops are low discharge batteries. So if you charge them and do not use them for a while, say 6 months they will not lost to much charge, they should be around 90% full. While regular nimh will be about 40% is the same time frame. I find the eneloop at 2000 nimh last as long as a 2700 nimh in the pentax k-x.

Hope this helps. It is a very good dslr. Which film slr do you have?
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 9:42 AM   #3
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Hi shoturtle, thanks for replying
The film SLR I have is a cheap Vivitar one, sorry I can't remember the model number. The lenses I have are not auto focus types and have apature rings on them so as I understand it I would have to put the K-x in manual mode and do everything manually except the shutter speed. I have a 50mm f1.7 Vivtar lens, a 28mm f2.8 Sigma, a 35-70mm f3.5 Cosina and a 70-210mm f4.5 Cosina. I know the two zooms aren't great lenses but my thinking is, buy the K-x with the 18-55mm kit lens and my lenses would give me lots to play with whilst I save up for some decent DSLR lenses.
Thanks for the info RE Eneloops being NiMH. How many shots do you get out of them?
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 1:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arrowhead View Post
Hi shoturtle, thanks for replying
I know the two zooms aren't great lenses but my thinking is, buy the K-x with the 18-55mm kit lens and my lenses would give me lots to play with whilst I save up for some decent DSLR lenses.
There may "better" lenses out there, but don't sell the 18-55mm kit lens short - it is really a pretty good general photography lens, and gives you a wider angle that anything else you have. It will do a good job letting you get used to autofocus while you decide what other lenses you might want to add later on.
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 2:45 PM   #5
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Arrowhead - I have been using a number of old manual lenses with the Pentax K-m (the model that came before the K-x) and enjoyed the ability to control focus manually. As Shoturtle said, Eneloops are nice because they hold charge much longer than regular rechargeables. I can get about 500 shots (more or less) with a set of Eneloops.
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 5:01 PM   #6
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Hello and welcome to the forum arrowhead!
You didn't say so but, we're assuming the old lenses you speak of are Pentax mount, correct? if so, you wont have any problem using them.
Cheers,
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 6:58 PM   #7
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Thank you for the welcomes.
With regard to the lenses, I was concerned that I would have problems manually focusing my old lenses on a DSLR because I think I'm right in saying that it doesn't have the circular focusing guide in the viewfinder that a film SLR camera has. I did read somewhere that when the shutter button is half pressed to set the shutter speed on a Pentax DSLR using manual focus lenses that focus would be confirmed by the green hexagon, is this true? When I said I would save up for some decent lenses, I meant I wanted to buy more lenses to add to the kit lens, not replace it (sorry, I should have been more clear) And yes they are all Pentax mount.
500 shots, that's better than what I get at the moment, great.
Here is a link to my flickr account so you can see the sort of photos I am taking at the moment with my Canon SX200, http://www.flickr.com/photos/arrow_180/

I've been looking at all your photos in the topics on here and I am very impressed with your skills and the quality and colour from your cameras. Mole, your photos in particular stand out to me as these are the types of shots I would like to take, you really do make the best of your K-m.
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Old Jan 23, 2010, 10:32 PM   #8
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Welcome, and don't hesitate to ask questions.

You are correct that the dSLR cameras don't have split focusing screens. You can buy third party ones - there's someone on ebay that offers them and Katz-Eye makes them. I happen to use manual focus quite a bit, my macro lens is manual focus and I use it often. I also use several of my M lenses, and still have the A*300 (which is auto exposure/manual focus). I don't have a split screen, though I occasionally think about them - they have some disadvantages.

The camera will both beep at you and show the green hexagon when it thinks that it has focus. I find I use the beep mostly, though people who shoot wildlife probably turn it off and never use it. At first I depended on the indicator, but since macro is one of my big interests, I found that with a little practice, I could see the focus. It does take practice though.

Are your old lenses manual or auto exposure? I have some of both, and it's not a big deal to use either, it's easier to have auto exposure lenses, less to think about. But it's not a big deal to use a manual lens, I found that pushing the green button becomes second nature when you use them for a while. If you have manual lenses and decide to get the K-x, make sure you find the menu option you need to change in order to use lenses with aperture rings.

I don't know about the K-x, but I use Rayovac hybrids in my K100 (purchased at WalMart). I can spend most of a day being a tourist on one or at the most two sets of batteries (depending on how many pictures I take). I think the K-x would go through them a bit faster, especially if you do much with video.
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Old Jan 24, 2010, 6:30 AM   #9
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Thanks, mtngal, this is sounding better and better
I've just been looking at my lenses again and it appears that the Sigma is auto but unfortunately it has some dust inside. I bought this lens second hand from a local camera shop but didn't get much use from it as I went to digital not long after buying it.





The other 3 lenses are all manual. When not using the kit lens the two I will want to use the most are the 50mm Vivitar and the 70-210mm Cosina. I got some lovely portrait shots with the 50mm Vivitar on my film camera, it is a very sharp lens.

Last edited by arrowhead; Jan 24, 2010 at 6:36 AM.
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Old Jan 24, 2010, 7:18 AM   #10
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To further add to what Harriet wrote, the focusing screen is quite usable with manual focus lenses, it just does not have the split circle. When you are using these older lenses the camera will revert to center point focusing (I keep mine on center point with the modern lenses too). It is quite possible to accurately focus on an off center subject just using the matte ground glass focusing screen. My first "real" camera was a Pentax digital but I have a number of manual focus lenses and none of them are a problem to use, in fact, most of my favorites are manual focus.

Tim

Last edited by NonEntity1; Jan 24, 2010 at 7:21 AM. Reason: clarification
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