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Old Apr 5, 2010, 4:26 AM   #11
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Can only agree with the comments above, interesting pictures and splendid photography. Good thing is that you'll have to go back again to retake some shots with your Zeni :-)
Are you posting these from HK or are you back home?

Kjell
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Last time I went to southern France and Israel I had only Zen 16mm, F50mm & FA135 and 2 cameras. Zenitar was in use practically all the time as Israel has a lot of tight spot to shot like this time (old and cramped space). Also in hindsight I should have borrowed from another Pentaxian in HK the DA*16-50mm zoom the wide end of which will be of better use. I am back to Toronto already.



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Very well done, Daniel-

Thanks for posting. These are very unique and interesting photos.

Sarah Joyce
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Thank you for sharing these Daniel.
I find the Chinese architect absolutely fascinating.
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These are great! I'm going to have to come back and look more closely when I get a little more time.
Patty
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Very interesting subject matter, thanks for the quick tour.
Sarah, GW, Patty, Shoturtle Many thanks
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Fascinating pictures Daniel. I certainly hope they devote the necessary resources to preserving this unique place. It seems like a place that definitely should be preserved. I'm a bit embarassed to admit it, but I really like your "tourist" shot.
Thanks. They are usually better photography wise as lighting condition is generally good.


Daniel with jet lag in Toronto
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 5:55 AM   #12
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Incredible shots fella!

Like mtngal said though it's sad that places like these are only usually a novelty for tourists, they usually just want to see a giant buddha, a temple and that's it.
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 6:51 AM   #13
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Thanks so much for the amazing photos of this fascinating, unique piece of history. Perhaps you can find some way to use your photos to encourage fundraising for protection...
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 7:42 AM   #14
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Thanks so much for the amazing photos of this fascinating, unique piece of history. Perhaps you can find some way to use your photos to encourage fundraising for protection...
Thanks for taking time to comment . Pictures of historic sites does help in educating others




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Incredible shots fella!

Like mtngal said though it's sad that places like these are only usually a novelty for tourists, they usually just want to see a giant buddha, a temple and that's it.
Agreed. But residents living there still need modern fixtures as shown. (the gas burner for a shower stall (middle lower)

It was difficult to shoot images without modern embellishment or fixtures in historic site

Daniel
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 7:50 AM   #15
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Unlike those in Europe, Chinese historic sites have a big disadvantage - use of wood rather than stone/marble except maybe the Great Wall.

We have 35 people in the group and the staircase as shown is supposed to take 20 at a time. And we are talking about 20 groups a day at least for these flimsy structures.



I was lucky in that a newly set up house (staircase with industrial runner, light sources and washrooms....) was available. A lot of those structures have succumbed to destruction by tourists and the damages were not even intentional.

Upkeep of those sites is very expensive indeed as wooden structures once destroyed is difficult to be refurbished

Daniel
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 8:49 AM   #16
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Great photos Daniel ! Very interesting .... another place to add to my growing list of places to go whilst here.

I can see my Sigma 10-20 would have come in handy !
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 9:20 AM   #17
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Great photos Daniel ! Very interesting .... another place to add to my growing list of places to go whilst here.

I can see my Sigma 10-20 would have come in handy !
Thanks.
There is always pros and cons of prime lens vs zoom. I do not know how big the Sigma zoom is . Zen 16mm is small. But if I take Zen I need to bring another camera body for my 50mm which means extra load on my back.

Daniel
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 11:16 AM   #18
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Agreed. But residents living there still need modern fixtures as shown. (the gas burner for a shower stall (middle lower)

It was difficult to shoot images without modern embellishment or fixtures in historic site

Daniel
I understand completely, in an ideal world it would treated in a similar way to places in Kyoto which have been refurbished to modern standards but keeping the tradition look and feel.
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 12:34 PM   #19
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Thanks.
There is always pros and cons of prime lens vs zoom. I do not know how big the Sigma zoom is . Zen 16mm is small. But if I take Zen I need to bring another camera body for my 50mm which means extra load on my back.

Daniel
It's not a small lens Daniel but if you are taking either a backpack with a dedicated camera compartment or even a small dedicated camera bag then it'll easily fit in. It's a great lens for landscapes / buildings / interiors and even people (if you get garlic close and personal) !

I've been trying it out today for close up action shots with my dog (GSD) and it seems to work great because even at 20mm I get all of her in without chopping off a nose or tail when she's jumping / running. I just have to remember that, as is written on car door mirrors, objects are MUCH closer that they appear - and get out of her way quickly by rolling over !

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/shop/wide-angle-zoom-lenses
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 3:31 PM   #20
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I understand completely, in an ideal world it would treated in a similar way to places in Kyoto which have been refurbished to modern standards but keeping the tradition look and feel.
I was in Kyoto in early 80s. Geez real eye opener in terms of preserving historic structures. It shares the same problem like the Chinese in that a lot of the structures (in both countries ) have been in wood.

Daniel
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