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Old Apr 5, 2010, 2:33 PM   #21
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It's not a small lens Daniel but if you are taking either a backpack with a dedicated camera compartment or even a small dedicated camera bag then it'll easily fit in. It's a great lens for landscapes / buildings / interiors and even people (if you get garlic close and personal) !

I've been trying it out today for close up action shots with my dog (GSD) and it seems to work great because even at 20mm I get all of her in without chopping off a nose or tail when she's jumping / running. I just have to remember that, as is written on car door mirrors, objects are MUCH closer that they appear - and get out of her way quickly by rolling over !

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/shop/wide-angle-zoom-lenses
I am not in any buying mood for lens. But it seems to be a great wide lens and I have heard a lot of positives about this.

Daniel
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 4:36 PM   #22
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Those are really beautiful. Thanks for posting.
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 7:27 PM   #23
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Daniel thanks for this wonderful series. The pictures are great, and the architecture is quite unusual.

Seeing the roof ventilation reminded me of the ingenuity of the Chinese people. While in Xi'an I saw another example of this. In a large apartment building complex large steel barrels were put on the roof to make solar hot water for showers. Not at all esthetic looking but totally functional.

I was also amazed at the use of bamboo scaffolding being used to build high rise skyscrapers. Bamboo is light weight, strong, cheap, and best of all it is a renewable resource. But you wouldn't catch me walking around 100+ stories off the ground on bamboo scaffolding. In fact, come to think of it, you wouldn't catch me walking around that high up on any kind of scaffolding. LOL

Lou
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 7:41 PM   #24
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Lyrics Thanks

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I was also amazed at the use of bamboo scaffolding being used to build high rise skyscrapers. Bamboo is light weight, strong, cheap, and best of all it is a renewable resource. But you wouldn't catch me walking around 100+ stories off the ground on bamboo scaffolding. In fact, come to think of it, you wouldn't catch me walking around that high up on any kind of scaffolding. LOL

Lou
Thanks Lou
Wait until you walk bouncing up and down on the bamboo scaffolding and you know
I had a good time indeed

Daniel
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 8:33 PM   #25
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Daniel,

I spent some more time looking at the images and reading through the wiki pages you linked to. This is amazing. I feel I am learning so much her the past few days on this forum. Thank you.

I used to be a coach for the structure problem of Odyssey of the Mind. This always involved making some sort of structure out of balsa wood that would withstand having huge weights put on it. Their structures would way in the ounces and hold many, many times their weight. I don't remember exactly right now, but it seems the structures would be a max of like 14 ounces and hold 100+ lbs of weight. Each year's restrictions were different. It was totally amazing. The kids would start out guessing it would hold it's own weight and by the time the season was over were so creative in finding ways to make it stronger.

Patty
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 10:57 PM   #26
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Daniel,

Thanks for sharing. Your pictures are a welcome change from the typical tourist snapshots. And yes, a Sigma 10-20 or a 12-24 would work well with these landscape and architecturally tight shots. I owned both before giving up both in favour of a Canon 16-35 2.8L and a 5D FF camera. That's because I thought I was not going to go back to a cropper camera, but now that I bought one last November, I'm in the market for these lenses again!
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Old Apr 5, 2010, 10:58 PM   #27
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Hah, that's my first post. Now you know who the forum lurkers are!
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Old Apr 6, 2010, 3:24 AM   #28
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Patty,

Thanks. You are welcome


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Daniel,

Thanks for sharing. Your pictures are a welcome change from the typical tourist snapshots. And yes, a Sigma 10-20 or a 12-24 would work well with these landscape and architecturally tight shots. I owned both before giving up both in favour of a Canon 16-35 2.8L and a 5D FF camera. That's because I thought I was not going to go back to a cropper camera, but now that I bought one last November, I'm in the market for these lenses again!

Thanks. Welcome to a Canon lurker.
A FF body with 16mm is very very wide already

Daniel
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