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Old Jun 9, 2010, 10:35 AM   #1
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Default Cottage along the River

Hi all! I know I showed this photo on Landscape, but I wasn't satisfied with, I think I oversharpened it so that the quality of the leaves were slightly diminished.

Using my K7, I tend to leave it on "Landscape". I know sometimes use "Vibrant" "Natural". Is there any advice for I should be using for such photos as the above. This photo was taken when I was walking to town, this scene is about 15 minutes from home.

Thanks.

Ned
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Old Jun 9, 2010, 4:27 PM   #2
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I like it, Ned. Its a lovely scene, over sharpened aside.
However, I think its a tad dark, try a touch of "shadow/highlights" adjustment and see if that doesn't improve it some.
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Old Jun 9, 2010, 4:31 PM   #3
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Thanks, GW. By the way, is there a way to standarize screens. I have an LG Flatron Wide 22", but I often wonder if what I see is the same as perhaps what you and others see.

All the best.

Ned
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Old Jun 9, 2010, 5:42 PM   #4
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Well... yes, There are calibration systems available, ranging from a couple hundred bucks on up. They can be used to calibrate your work flow from camera to finished print. I have very limited knowledge about what the best one is to get and plan to research it some more before I get one.
I know Harriet (mntgal) has one she likes and perhaps she will chime in here and give you a lot more info regarding them.
There are some software programs (free) that will give you a pretty fair guess at calibrating your monitor but, not terribly accurate. I use one that came with my video card and then adjust it a little more using several photos that I know pretty much what they should look like, and adjust it accordingly.
One of the problems I have, is using two monitors, one LCD and the other a CRT. Some photos look pretty close on each one but, sometimes a particular photo will look too bright on my LCD but look fine on the CRT. I can't explain why that is, it just is.
In any case, if they look too dark on the LCD, they usually are. Of course, that's a subjective opinion.
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Old Jun 9, 2010, 5:50 PM   #5
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If you have a big enough SD card then shoot in RAW and use the Pentax Laboratory or whatever it's called to process them later. You can choose whatever preset you like in the software without risking messing the colour up like you might if you play with WB presets on a processed jpeg.

The bee shots I took were from RAW, and the "auto" mode produced a very cool colour, so changed it to flash (it didn't know the flash fired as it doesn't recognise it and I shoot in manual to compensate for the flash) and obtained a better image.
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Old Jun 9, 2010, 6:08 PM   #6
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Many thanks, guys!
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Old Jun 10, 2010, 10:57 PM   #7
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I had a lovely response all typed up and hit post when my computer lost it's connection. Hate it when that happens.

Short answers - love the shot, while the overall tone of the shot is somewhat dark, it rather suits the scene. I like it.

I've tried two different calibrators - the Pantone Huey and the Datacolor Spyder 3. The Huey did a lousy job with laptop monitors, was never completely satisfied with it. The Spyder 3 works very well, I really like it. It's definitely worth the extra cost over the Huey.

Software programs require you to match things and I can never get the target to match whatever it's supposed to match. My monitor always looked worse when I tried such things.

I leave my camera set to natural and then shoot raw mostly. The times I switch to jpg I get results that are close and I can usually adjust it in photoshop.
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