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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:14 PM   #1
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Default Jones Meadow to Firescald Knob

Took a little 5-6 mile stroll from Jones Meadow out to Big Firescald Knob and back yesterday. Main purpose was to search for a rare wildflower that was blooming there last year (not found this time), and to enjoy the great views (thick fog & drizzle most of the day). But it was still a great walk through some fine rich green land!
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:15 PM   #2
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We've had a rather dry summer at the lower elevations, but up here in the high country it's been a different story. You can tell by all the lush ferns!
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:17 PM   #3
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One of my favorite high country ferns is Polypody - which means "many feet." And it does "walk" down the rocks and logs by curving on down, and then sprouting anew.
Here are several views - any preferences?
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:19 PM   #4
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All this moisture makes for some very interesting little details on the vines, on the spiderwebs...
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:20 PM   #5
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Plenty of moisture also means a great berry crop. The first is a rather poisonous (to humans) fruit called Bluebead Lily. Second are some native Blueberries - quite tasty.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:22 PM   #6
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Trilliums up at the Knob must have had a great bloom this year - almost every plant we saw had a fruit!
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:24 PM   #7
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Speaking of bloom, late summer is bloom season for several of our native Lilies. Here are a few views of Carolina Lily (also called Michaux's Lily). Which do you prefer?
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:27 PM   #8
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Carolina Lilies look a lot like Turk's Cap Lilies. But their leaves are wider, they usually have fewer blooms per plant, and there is no green at the base of the petals. They also seem to grow in more shaded, moister parts of the forest.
So we sought out a drier, sunnier location to find some Turk's Cap Lilies. It looks like the Pipevine Swallowtails found them first!
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:28 PM   #9
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There were no great views this time, but some tempting glimpses between the waves of fog & cloud.
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Old Jul 20, 2010, 12:29 PM   #10
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Hope you enjoyed this little mountaintop stroll, and that we will meet "out on the trail" one of these fine days soon!

Thanks in advance for any comments, suggestions, critique...
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