Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 7, 2010, 11:19 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
thkn777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,831
Default

Hm,
I have mixed feelings about HDR as some images end up way too artificial for me and people still claim this is what they saw . Don't get me wrong, I just mean the images that passed the "very colorful" border by far... Other than that it's a great technology to capture and show, what was really there, and that part is, what I like about HDR.

I'd like to mention another nice tool for M$ Windows systems:
http://www.traumflieger.de/desktop/DRI/dri_tool.php

- it's free
- very easy to operate
- results are nice

It's in german only, but I'd offer help here if needed. If people are interested, I'll make some screenshots and give the english explanations.
thkn777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 11:43 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
thkn777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,831
Default

If you are like me,
then you don't have your tripod with you every time and often enough there isn't a good place to drop your camera and use the self timer and a bracketing shot (which is still a good method )

Thos shots will be unusable in most HDR programs as they are not aligned. The good news is, that Autostitch (http://cvlab.epfl.ch/~brown/autostitch/autostitch.html) can produce a "HDR" image from these if you choose the right settings. Results are usable, of course you have to postprocess the result, but that's fine for me.

Just for clarification: Autostitch is not a HDR tool, but can help to produce an image with the HDR idea in mind.

Have fun,
Th.
thkn777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 11:43 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Frogfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,774
Default

That sounds good enough to me Glen !

I would like to comment on those shots already posted but I'll hold my tongue as per the rules !!

Thanks for the Autostitch link Th (Theo ?) & link to (Dreamflyer) - some programs will help with the alignment but others need help and stitching tools can do that for you.

Last edited by Frogfish; Aug 7, 2010 at 11:47 AM.
Frogfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 5:09 PM   #14
Junior Member
 
queyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 22
Default

Hey all,

I used my cat pic from my post, http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...used-lens.html to create the image. I used photoshop elements 8.

To create the HDR image, I duplicated the original image twice. On the first duplicate image, I set the image to screen and then merged down. On the second image, I set it to multiply and did a gaussian blur then merged down. On the final image, i adjusted the brightness a bit. Let me know if this passes or doesn't pass for an HDR image. Enjoy!

Thanks,
Rod

Last edited by queyan; Aug 7, 2010 at 8:42 PM. Reason: remove incorrect
queyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 6:31 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thkn777 View Post
Hm,
I have mixed feelings about HDR as some images end up way too artificial for me and people still claim this is what they saw . Don't get me wrong, I just mean the images that passed the "very colorful" border by far... Other than that it's a great technology to capture and show, what was really there, and that part is, what I like about HDR.
.
I don't think a good HDR image needs to be exaggerated, other than as a means of getting more "pop" (a"punchier" image) or as a form of art (nothing wrong with that). For realistic reproduction HDR can rescue images otherwise unusable due to excessive tonal ranges, and without seeing the original(s) you would (and should) never know HDR was used.

In a recent visit to a local air museum I took a series of pictures (with enough good sense to bracket exposures) in extremely tough lighting conditions - lots of glare from reflections, intense backlight from the large hanger windows, and some flare from the wide angles necessary in the crowded conditions. If interested, you can see a series I have been posting (Parts I & II so far, with more to come) in the Transportation Forum of K7/Sigma 10-20 images (all hand held bracketed series merged and processed in HDRtist) and a few one shot tone maps from the Fuji HS10 (in the Fujifilm P&S Forum). The shot at the top of this thread is from Part I of that series. While they might not be the greatest of photos, many of them could have been unusable without HDR processing; those that could have been were noticeably improved. After thinking the visit a bust, I tried running them through HDRtist, and I was elated to see how my first venture into HDR turned out!

BTW: Frogfish, Gimp is also available for the Mac.
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.

Last edited by penolta; Aug 7, 2010 at 7:28 PM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 6:31 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

queyan - Just my opinion, but I wouldn't call what you did either HDR or tone-mapping.

HDR is supposed to capture dynamic range that the camera sensor is not capable of capturing - very useful for scenes where a regular exposure has highlights blown and clipping in shadows. Taking a single raw file, "developing" it once for the highlights, then again for the shadows (letting the highlights blow out) and then combining them, which is what Glenn did for his roller-coaster shot can be considered HDR (though some will debate that, I won't).

Tone-mapping always requires special software and is a way of bringing out detail etc. It's less definable as far as I'm concerned, you can have a picture that's obviously tone-mapped, and others that look very natural. But it does try to equal out the dynamic range, making the shadows lighter and the highlights a bit darker, bringing out detail in the whole picture.

What you did with the cat picture is normally called Orton effect and is a totally separate process. It's origins go back to film days, though I've only run across it fairly recently. It's aim is not to increase dynamic range, but to add softness and a dreamy quality to a picture. I really like what it did with the cat picture, though if it were mine, I probably would have done another layer of the original sharp eyes and put that on top, so the eyes are sharp while the rest of the picture has the Orton softness/dreaminess. It fits with the cat's expression and the lighting, I really like the picture.

I'll defer to others about whether this fits the challenge category, but my opinion is that it doesn't.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 7:14 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mount Shasta, California
Posts: 1,525
Default

From Wikipedia: In image processing, computer graphics, and photography, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI or just HDR) is a set of techniques that allow a greater dynamic range of luminances between the lightest and darkest areas of an image than standard digital imaging techniques or photographic methods. Tone mapping techniques, which reduce overall contrast to facilitate display of HDR images on devices with lower dynamic range, can be applied to produce images with preserved or exaggerated local contrast for artistic effect.

I personally think there is a lot of leeway in HDR imaging. It can be either realistic or artistic, but should involve different exposure ranges.

Last edited by pboerger; Aug 7, 2010 at 7:17 PM.
pboerger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 7:49 PM   #18
Junior Member
 
queyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 22
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
queyan - Just my opinion, but I wouldn't call what you did either HDR or tone-mapping.
Ah ok...I'll try again.

Thanks
queyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 7, 2010, 8:49 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
queyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 22
Default

2nd try

I followed an hdr tutorial for elements and came up with this. It is a petrified tree from the petrified forest in Arizona. It was along the way to Grand Canyon and we decided to take a look. I included the before and after shot. Please let me know if this passes for HDR. Enjoy

Thanks,
Rod
Attached Images
  

Last edited by queyan; Aug 7, 2010 at 8:50 PM. Reason: fix description
queyan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2010, 12:40 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
Frogfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,774
Default

Oh dear - what have I started !

I think we should go with pboerger's definition & conclusion : there is a lot of leeway in HDR imaging. It can be either realistic or artistic, but should involve different exposure ranges.

I did love the cat shot but agree with Harriet - it did have more of an Orton effect (co-incidentally I was just reading up on that last month).

In the end we all get to vote on them anyway so if one doesn't fit the criteria we won't select it. All just a bit of fun !
Frogfish is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:24 PM.