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Old Sep 11, 2010, 9:10 PM   #1
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Default a few more b&w's

These first two are from a trip to Lawrence, MA downtown area in July. The last two are different takes of a walkway into the gardens across from the chapel by the sea I posted earlier this year. Every time I've been there this summer I've either had the film camera or the leaves hadn't come out yet. I'll try to get back soon.

Which of the gate ones do you prefer? I like features of each.

Patty

p.s. Does anyone do their own developing? What might be causing all my photos to come out with white specks all over them? They aren't in the same spots. And, not as much in all photos. I've only recently started developing my own b&w.
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 9:15 PM   #2
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I like these even better! cool.
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 9:28 PM   #3
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i really like 2 and three, excellent job! Number one is very cool as well but the tilt kinda bugs me a tad.
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 11:14 PM   #4
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Very nice! I think I like the first gate (photo #3) better. Logically I would have expected to like the second one (#4) better because the path gives it more of a sense of place, but I like the lighting/contrast in the first one better. And the picture doesn't need placement - a gate is a gate. I like the fewer elements better.

I've never attempted to develop my own photos. So this is a wild guess - could it be something in the water - its not filtered enough? Probably those who have done their own development will laugh at it, but I was trying to come up with something that would be a contaminant.
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Old Sep 12, 2010, 8:55 AM   #5
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Hi Patty,

A very nice series!

I used to do my own B&W darkroom work when I was a kid, and still have most of the stuff sitting in a closet somewhere, but I haven't shot a roll of film in an SLR since the '70s, and only shot P&S 35mm film cameras up until I took the digital plunge in the early '90s, so darkroom techniques are not fresh in my mind.

The things that I do remember are that air bubbles can mess with both negs and prints. For the negs, you need to tap the tanks against the table a few times to dislodge the bubbles, and with prints, you have to slide the paper into the chemicals from one end to the other, letting the liquid roll over the surface of the paper. I always grabbed a corner of the paper with the tongs and gave it a couple of jiggles while I was agitating the trays to make sure that any other possibilty of bubbles was eliminated.

Dust on the neg could also cause problems, but they'd show up in the same places on the prints.

This has brought back some memories. I always liked the smells in the darkroom, especially the stop bath, for some reason. Maybe I need to keep an open container of ascetic acid near my computer while I'm doing PP work. . .

Every once in a while I pull out the F1 and a couple of lenses and play with them, but I'm not even tempted to load a roll into it. The camera has had a lot of miles on it, but it could still take pitures, I'm sure, but for a pro level camera, it seems so primitive and clunky. The VF is BIG though, and I fear that I'd get too spoiled by it if I looked through it too much so I put it away after a few minutes of playing. . . The film camera that I do fondle a lot is my Minox 35 EL -- a really great stealth camera -- zone focusing and almsot silent shutter, With its f2,8 lens and some TriX I got some great candids of friends in my post college days.

I just can't bring myself to shoot film. For me the advantages of digital totally trump film, and I'm fascinated by what can be done in PP with an advanced editor.

Obviously you're getting something out of this, so keep it up! There is something special about seeing the print appear in the developing tank that is magical. . .

Scott
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Old Sep 12, 2010, 9:45 AM   #6
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Patty, I like the first gate picture as well. The gate centered between the two shrubs gives it a leading line. I like the composition a lot.

Nice shots of Lawrence. As close as it is to where I live, I never seem to go there to take pictures. Every time I go there, I tell myself I have to spend a day walking around taking pictures of the canals and old mill buildings. Your shot of the outdoor cafe makes it look quite inviting.

Lou
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Old Sep 12, 2010, 4:19 PM   #7
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Patty, I have not developed a roll of B&W film since some time in the early 1980s, so my memory is very rusty. That said, my first thought when you described the white spots was air bubbles in the developer. Then I read Scott's response, and I was glad to see that another on this forum had the same idea. As he suggested, once the film reels are loaded into the canister, a few gentle taps should dislodge any bubbles. If it's not air bubbles then I'm stumped.
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Old Sep 12, 2010, 5:30 PM   #8
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GW - Thanks.

NMRecording - Thanks, too. The first one I was struggling getting down to see through the viewfinder as I'd just had surgery. But, I liked it when I saw it. Gave it a different look.

mtngal - #3 I like better, too. Even though #4 should be the "correct" way to take that photo. I like it in b&w as opposed to color, too. I think color would make it too much. The water I'm using is filtered. At least my husband said he filtered it. But, it's weird that it's not always in the same spot.

snostorm - We are only developing the film here at home. We don't have a darkroom yet. Maybe some day. We are scanning the negatives. But, I am tapping the container on the counter lightly a few times during the process. And, before we scan we blow air over them, so it can't be dust either. I've cleaned the glass on the scanner. I'm running out of ideas. I'll post portions of one that came out particularly spotty. Some are like hairs, some spots, some spots like a rash. See the images I post. You'll see what I mean.

keltech - Thanks. I was taking weird photos that day. I've got a roll of color film around here somewhere of Lawrence I took the same day, but can't figure out where I put it. I'll find it some day. You really should take a day in Lawrence. There's tons to photograph.

mtnman - maybe having images will help.

My husband says it's not happening to him. So, I'd think it was the camera. But, when I ran a roll through my old Canon the same thing happened. Even if my husband does the developing it's happening. Mind you my husband can be blind at times. So, his photos may actually have spots, too
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Old Sep 13, 2010, 7:47 PM   #9
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Patty, the top photo (window panes) looks like dust and fibers (such as hair) on the negative. The lower one (thumb?) I'm less certain about. Could be dust or other paticles on the negative, but also looks like it could be some glitch in the development process that created very dense spots on the negative (which would be white in prints). I'm so badly out of practice with darkroom techniques, I'm really not qualified to offer an opinion beyond what little I just said. I have not developed a roll of film in more than 25 years.
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Old Sep 14, 2010, 5:55 AM   #10
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It's been a loooong time since I did any darkroom work, so can't offer any help with this. But did very much enjoy the fruits of your darkroom work! Will agree with Harriet about the gates, and probably for the same reasons...
Another great series - even the unique angle on the benches!
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