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Old Dec 6, 2010, 1:15 PM   #21
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Great pictures, Ronny. You and this camera make a great team.

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Originally Posted by Monza76 View Post
The "robin" in Europe is so different from the bird we call a "robin" in North America. Your robin is similar to small birds like a sparrow while over here it is a larger bird and part of the thrush family I believe (ornithologists out there???).
Since you asked . . . . Although differenet in side-by-side photographs, both robins are thrushes. The English Robin is the original "Robin Redbreast" of the nursery rhymes. When English (and other) settlers came to this country, they often applied familiar names to unfamiliar birds that resembled those of their homeland, however loosely. In this case, our bird properly is called the American Robin, and the original one is simply "The" Robin.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 6:35 AM   #22
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Late in commenting (have not been near electronics for some days...) but just wanted to repeat what others have already said so well - great job on all of these! This lens is a great tool in your talented hands!
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Old Dec 8, 2010, 5:33 PM   #23
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Hi Ronny,

Another late commenter -- Great series!

Our GBHs don't seem to stick around until it snows. . . both shots are top notch.

I like your squirrels better than our grey squrrels -- they look much more pixie-like. I also have always preferred your Robins to ours for some reason. . .

Looks like there's a good connection between you and the K-5 developing. . . it won't be long until I grab one -- just waiting for the right deal. . .

Scott
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 3:00 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by tacticdesigns View Post
Ronny,
I love the series. Especially love #1 and #4 (the last one).
The detail in #1 is mezmerizing. And the posture of #4 is so peaceful and dynamic all at once!
I love it!
Thanks Glen
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 3:04 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by penolta View Post
Great pictures, Ronny. You and this camera make a great team.



Since you asked . . . . Although differenet in side-by-side photographs, both robins are thrushes. The English Robin is the original "Robin Redbreast" of the nursery rhymes. When English (and other) settlers came to this country, they often applied familiar names to unfamiliar birds that resembled those of their homeland, however loosely. In this case, our bird properly is called the American Robin, and the original one is simply "The" Robin.
Thanks Pen

and to think I was planning to sell that lens ,found it to heavy and only used it with a monopod. Luckily I found a tip from Joe Nc Nally on youtube that made me change my idea

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDsx3-FWfwk)
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 3:10 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by snostorm View Post
Hi Ronny,

Another late commenter -- Great series!

Our GBHs don't seem to stick around until it snows. . . both shots are top notch.

I like your squirrels better than our grey squrrels -- they look much more pixie-like. I also have always preferred your Robins to ours for some reason. . .

Looks like there's a good connection between you and the K-5 developing. . . it won't be long until I grab one -- just waiting for the right deal. . .

Scott
Thanks Scott,

the GBH never leave so that's easy. The last years we're starting to have winters again. Looks like nature is changing again.
(4 years back it wouldn't even freeze during the day.)

I'm getting the hang of the camera. Only some things that got me a bit confused. (like what the effect is off using highlight and shadow correction in raw and if I need it)
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 5:59 AM   #27
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Thanks Scott,

the GBH never leave so that's easy. The last years we're starting to have winters again. Looks like nature is changing again.
(4 years back it wouldn't even freeze during the day.)

I'm getting the hang of the camera. Only some things that got me a bit confused. (like what the effect is off using highlight and shadow correction in raw and if I need it)
Hi Ronny,

They wouldn't be happy if they stayed here -- right now it's +10F (-12C), and falling. . .

Most of the settings for image enhancement don't matter for RAW, except that they set up the default conversion parameters in the Pentax software and any other converter that might read and be able to use them. I usually shoot jpeg, so I'm really not the one to ask about this though.

Shooting RAW, you should get the max DR out of the capture, so you'd get the most latitude for getting the most detail from either highlights or shadows in any shot. I've seen some really extreme edits of from 5-8 stops underexposed (essentially a black frame), then processed from the RAW files, and the colors contrast and detail looked like a normally exposed shot -- really amazing stuff.

This opens up some possibilities -- you could conceivably shoot a whole party in RAW indoors in manual mode without flash at ISO 100, 1/200, and f5.6, and be covered for anything down to about EV 0 (theoretically 1 sec, f1.0, ISO 100 -- pretty dark!). If your meter showed a correct exposure or above, you'd have to stop down further or increase the shutter speed. You could correct the exposures in PP and probably get good results. . .but that would take a lot of the fun out of this photography thing. . .

There is, of course a lot less latitude to recover blown out areas, so erring to the left on the histogram (underexposed) is probably your best bet, and the low levels of noise in the shadows will allow you to recover details here without too much penalty. This is the advantage of a low noise sensor -- you don't have to flirt with overexposure by exposing to the right on the histogram to retain IQ.

Jpegs only will allow maybe a couple of stops of underexposure since the file is processed and compressed. There's still can be a surprising amount of information in a black frame jpeg though. . .

When I get mine, I'll probably still shoot jpegs most of the time, but I think I might make a habit out of chimping the first shot of each string, then saving it as a RAW after the fact if my exposure is off. I'll then make any changes that I need to get the exposure where I want it, and continue to shoot jpegs.

The more I think about the possibilities, the more I want to get my hands on one of these. . .

Scott
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