Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 17, 2011, 4:46 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default What's buzzin' cousin?

There's this thing in our yard that looks like a tree trunk where there ought not to be one:

1
Name:  IMGP1286r2.jpg
Views: 223
Size:  182.6 KB

Looks like it has scaly bark, too:

2
Name:  IMGP1282r.jpg
Views: 186
Size:  177.2 KB

Unh- - - - Oh, Oh!

3
Name:  IMGP1290r.jpg
Views: 186
Size:  160.6 KB

Jeez, Louise, it's Beez!!!

4
Name:  IMGP1293r.jpg
Views: 197
Size:  170.2 KB

A sign of spring, I guess! We had a couple of warm days, so they swarmed, but it's supposed to rain hard tomorrow, which will give them a good soaking and might encourage them to move, although it might get too cold for them to be active. I wonder where they will go next to establish their colony? Not in our attic, we hope!

k20/Sigma 120-400, hand held
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.

Last edited by penolta; Feb 17, 2011 at 4:55 PM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 17, 2011, 5:42 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Penolta, how are you going to make lemonade out of that big swarm.

Les
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2011, 5:56 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lesmore49 View Post
Penolta, how are you going to make lemonade out of that big swarm.

Les
Sweeten it with honey? Maybe I won't have to, Les. They are no longer in that spot - don't know (yet?) where they moved to.
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.

Last edited by penolta; Feb 19, 2011 at 3:38 PM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2011, 9:54 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
kashka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Minnedosa Manitoba
Posts: 1,158
Default

Cool shots! Bees are good!..bee happy..
kashka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2011, 11:52 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Frogfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,774
Default

Good to see. Bees are in big trouble (and that means so are we) - there's been a huge reduction in the number of bees and therefore also in plant pollination.
__________________
http://frogfish.smugmug.com
Pentax : 15 Ltd, 77 Ltd, 43/1.9 Ltd, Cosina 55/1.2, DA*300/4, Contax Zeiss Distagon 28/2.8, Raynox 150/250, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.

Nikon : D800, D600, Sigma 500/4.5, Sigma 120-300/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 - 21/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 - 35/2.0, Nikkor 85/1.8G, Sigma 50/1.4. Nikon x1.4 TC, Sigma x2.0 TC
Frogfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 18, 2011, 7:09 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Rodney9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Yeronga, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 3,518
Default

Wow !
__________________

My Flickr Photos

Pentax K-5 K20D K100D
Pentax DA 55-300mm 4-5.8 ED / Pentax M 200mm F4 / Pentax Tak K 135mm 2.5 / Pentax M 100mm F4 Macro / Tamron SP AF90mm 2.8 Di Macro / Pentax M 1.7 50mm / Pentax M 2.8 28mm
Rodney9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 19, 2011, 10:55 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,052
Default

Cool shots, I'm sure you stayed at a safe distance. I wondered if you had made some bee keeper happy. There was a swarm that appeared one Monday morning a couple of years ago in a Jacaranda tree in front of my office. It was huge, like yours. I had assumed that there was some type of framework (honeycomb) that was part of the mass, that perhaps they had been busy. A bee keeper appeared later in the day and literally vacuumed up the bees - the whole thing was all bees! He seemed happy and everyone in the buildings around the tree were much happier.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 19, 2011, 2:36 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Goldwinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Posts: 6,515
Default

Great capture, Pen. Like Kevin mentioned, I have read and heard a lot about the honey bee population dying off unexplainably. And also the cross breeding of what some call African killer bees that seem to be causing some concern among bee keepers.
__________________
GW

Life's a breeze on a Goldwing...
Goldwinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 19, 2011, 3:31 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldwinger View Post
Great capture, Pen. Like Kevin mentioned, I have read and heard a lot about the honey bee population dying off unexplainably. And also the cross breeding of what some call African killer bees that seem to be causing some concern among bee keepers.
The mystery of that die-off has recently been solved - the bees die off when hit with a double whammy of a mite infestation and a virus. They can survive either one, but not both.

Aggressive African "killer" bees are unfortunately too common - locally, a man in Long Beach last year was mowing his lawn when attacked and killed by African or Africanized bees. The African bees escaped from an experimental project and are more aggressive and produce less honey, both good reasons for their unpopularity (the USDA never should have allowed them to be brought into the country in the first place). Some think (hope?) the African genes are being "diluted" by interbreeding with domesticated ones (hence "Africanized"), but an African queen can invade a hive, kill the native queen and take over the colony, eventually replacing the original bees with her own offspring. There has been an aggressive program to eliminate African bees wherever they are found (but are hard to tell apart from the docile ones by examination, and specimens have to be sent off to specialized laboratories for confirmation). Some claim that all bees (at least here in California - the African bees do not survive in colder climates) are to some degree Africanized, but the ones in my yard (the "mother colony" of that swarm is somewhere within a densely vegetated corner of our yard), have been there for a year without causing a problem. We have fenced off that corner and don't go poking around in there. And, yes, Harriet, I didn't get any closer to that bunch of bees than 25 or 30 feet.
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.

Last edited by penolta; Feb 19, 2011 at 3:44 PM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 19, 2011, 6:27 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
nhmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern New Hampshire
Posts: 5,202
Default

Yikes! Is all I have to say.
nhmom is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:24 AM.