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Old Mar 25, 2011, 1:13 PM   #1
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Default Yale University Architecture - Plates 6 - 10

Plate 6 - Rosencrantz Hall, Detail North atrium and associated structures. Rosencrantz Hall houses faculty and staff members from the Political Science Department and the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale.

Taken at golden hour tonight, at around 4:30 pm. The sky was a beautiful diffuse pink color by the time I got to this location.





Plate 7 - Detail - Rosencrantz Hall. I ended back at the same location I was at yesterday, mostly because I had little time this afternoon.

Another glass/stone/shadows shot. The things that interested me in this were the shadows. Look at the diagonal shadows on the wall, especially the thin ones cast by the window frames.

Other than that, I could not get this quite right. Using a polarizer takes some getting used to.




Plate 8 - Stairwell, Yale University Art Gallery. I started to move away from the receding theme and so decide to rejoin it in an unexpected way. Had to sneak my camera in here. No flash, those highlights were from lighting. Hand held 1/2 second, f/6.3, ISO 1600. This is where a K-r or K-5 would be quite handy.



Plate 9 - Detail - Stairwell, Yale Museum of Art. Architect: Louis Kahn, built between 1951 and 1953. The thing to notice here is that triangles were the theme. You can see that the staircase itself is arranged as a triangle from the previous photo. What is amazing is that if you look, there are a number of "organic" triangles that show up - not explicitly created, but which are created virtually from different aspect of the perspective. Hand Held - ISO 800, 1/30th of a second at f/8



Plate 10 - Detail, Peabody Natural History Museum entrance.

A little bit of a different finish here, and not quite perfect for the set. Still, it does have receding lines, stone and glass. Not a perfect fit, but I was in meetings all day and needed a relatively quick shot. Pre-visualized and planned. The weather cooperated perfectly as it was monotone gray all day until I left the building. I've been lucky in this way.


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Old Mar 25, 2011, 1:22 PM   #2
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Really like #1 & #3 - lovely set.
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Old Mar 25, 2011, 10:31 PM   #3
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An interesting series. The interesting shadows/lighting in #2 - took me a bit to see it. Once I did, I kept going back to it. I need to shoot with a polarizer more, I rarely think mine, too often not bothering dig it out. Your pictures are inspiring, gotta go out and explore some of the more interesting buildings around me more.
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Old Mar 26, 2011, 8:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frogfish View Post
Really like #1 & #3 - lovely set.
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
The interesting shadows/lighting in #2 - took me a bit to see it.
I understand that because it was just about this time that I actually started seeing such things sort of in real time... I still don't do it consistently, but I have begun trying to see beyond the explicit scene and go right for the shadow and light. When I saw the scent in #2, it was not so much the window that fascinated me but the strong geometry of the entire scene given the shadows and light.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Your pictures are inspiring, gotta go out and explore some of the more interesting buildings around me more.
That's a huge compliment. Thank you. I'll be looking for your work on this. I have to say I did not know how fascinating I would find it as a discipline.

One of the things I learned in doing this... and sometimes it is hard... is that at least one element in the picture needs to be square or plumb with the frame or edge of the photo. Somehow it grounds the piece and is often a starting point for the eye... Not a hard and fast rule, but usually observed in my stuff...

Kind regards,

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