Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 1, 2011, 11:53 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default Planned and Executed, part 2

Since I got the last plan to object to work, it gave me confidence to try a building again. I had the same problem with the regular elevation as I had before - I couldn't get the photo to match the drawing. However, I found a 3D elevation for this modern building that seemed to work better than a true elevation. However, the drawing's perspective was different than mine, but I got it to work reasonably well:



I had another idea that was somewhat related to this but I can't quite find a building and drawing to match. There's another building I'd like to try something like this with, but have doubts that it would work. I'll have to think of some other way to blend them though - this worked really well with the blueprint, but is rather boring with a regular drawing.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 2, 2011, 1:37 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Frogfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai, China
Posts: 2,774
Default

This is an awesome idea and you've implemented it perfectly - I really like these. There could be a commercial opportunity in this for you somewhere !
__________________
http://frogfish.smugmug.com
Pentax : 15 Ltd, 77 Ltd, 43/1.9 Ltd, Cosina 55/1.2, DA*300/4, Contax Zeiss Distagon 28/2.8, Raynox 150/250, AFA x1.7, Metz 50 af1.

Nikon : D800, D600, Sigma 500/4.5, Sigma 120-300/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 - 21/2.8, Zeiss Distagon ZF2 - 35/2.0, Nikkor 85/1.8G, Sigma 50/1.4. Nikon x1.4 TC, Sigma x2.0 TC
Frogfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 2, 2011, 2:58 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Rodney9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Yeronga, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Posts: 3,518
Default

I like this even better, very cool.
__________________

My Flickr Photos

Pentax K-5 K20D K100D
Pentax DA 55-300mm 4-5.8 ED / Pentax M 200mm F4 / Pentax Tak K 135mm 2.5 / Pentax M 100mm F4 Macro / Tamron SP AF90mm 2.8 Di Macro / Pentax M 1.7 50mm / Pentax M 2.8 28mm
Rodney9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 2, 2011, 8:04 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 54
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
I couldn't get the photo to match the drawing. However, I found a 3D elevation for this modern building that seemed to work better than a true elevation. However, the drawing's perspective was different than mine, but I got it to work reasonably well
Well done!

I am thinking that in some cases, your issue may simply be one of "keystoning" of the effect that occurs when you point your lens up a little at a target that is tall. Perspective distortion... I can demonstrate this, but do not wish to hijack. If that is the case, there is relatively inexpensive software that will correct for that. When the time comes I'll make sure I show some "corrected" shots in my architecture series. In the interim, have a look at this... you can demo the software, and it does much more than perspective correction, it also has lens profiles and will correct for barrel distortion on a lens by lens basis and also does CA correction.

Base page: http://epaperpress.com/ptlens/
Examples - perspective correction: http://epaperpress.com/ptlens/

This can of course be done through photoshop and like in a more manual way, but I love this software and thought I'd give it a shout out in a context within which I think it excels (I have no financial or other connection to this software, it's authors, assigns or ....)

Tools aside, this is brilliant stuff.

seaain
seaain.gray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 2, 2011, 8:36 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
hnikesch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,814
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
this worked really well with the blueprint, but is rather boring with a regular drawing.
You could change the print to a negative and change the black to blue to create a blueprint, It still looks neat the way it is.


Hans
__________________
Hans

...It is better to burn a roll of film than curse the darkness. Equip. K30, Q7, DAL 55-300, DA 35 f2.4, DA 50 f1.8 DA 18-135, SMC-M 28 f3.5, SMC M 50 f1.4, Canon P&S S100 w/CHDK Beta, Panasonic DMC-GM5, Flickr:
hnikesch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 2, 2011, 10:40 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

I'll look at this software, always interested in such things. I use both Lightroom (which does have some ability to adjust such things) and also Photoshop, which is what I was using to manipulate things - I needed both layers visible to try to match things up.

With this picture it's probably perspective as I'm sure the architect used 3D software for the drawing, and it should be accurate. I noticed that my lines on the sides aren't at the same angle, so that will have a big effect (but perhaps could have been corrected in software). But thinking about it last night, I came up with some other issues that I don't think can be corrected - while software can correct barreling and pincushioning effects of lenses, I don't think they can correct focal length changes - i.e., they can't change the compression effect you get with long lenses or the fall-off (can't think of a better way to say it right now) you get with a wide angle.

This and the second picture I took of one side of the building were taken with the 12-24. While I could get the edges of the building lined up, there were internal elements that wouldn't line up. It wasn't as obvious with this scene, but it was very obvious with the elevation. If you think about what an elevation is - it is a scaled drawing where the distance from any point is accurate - the size of any element is accurate and the distance between any two elements is exactly what it would be if you measured it.

The problem comes when you stand away from your subject. Then the sides are much further away from you than the center (you make one point of a triangle, with longer lines to the outside of the building and a short one to the center - essentially 2 right angle triangles with the building being one side and the line from you to the outsides of the building being the hypotenuse - that's about the extent of what I remember about geometry!), and that will be accentuated if you use a wide angle lens like I had to because of the urban environment I was shooting in. Using software to correct perspective (for instance, falling vertical lines) wouldn't be able to deal with how a lens handles distance differences, and drawings, even the 3D drawings like the one I used here, aren't designed to deal with that. And I don't know enough about Photoshop to be able to push and pull specific parts of an object to be able to deal with this - the picture of the elevation had the front door, near the center of the building, appear larger while the elements at the edges of the building were smaller compared to the elevation.

Hans - I did think about doing that, but with a modern drawing that's so obviously done on AutoCAD, I thought it wouldn't be as appropriate. Now if I manage to make this type of thing work with a historical building I really like, then I definitely will do something like that.

I'm apologize for getting so philosophical about this, I'm sure I've bored some of you. I do get carried away when something like this interests me.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 2, 2011, 3:09 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
snostorm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Chicago Suburb, IL, USA
Posts: 2,770
Default

Hi Harriet,

I'm getting a better understanding of your occasional mention of wanting a tilt-shift lens. . .

This is a great concept!

Your two examples are very effective and exceptionally well done.

No need to apologize for attention to detail -- it's an important component to pulling off a concept like this, and that's what makes it work. I'm sure the process you're going through is teaching you more about perspective than I'll ever learn, and this is the kind of thing that will help in your photography, even if it's a consideration that is applied almost unconsciously. It becomes part of your photographic "instinct" that many others will not share.

Scott
snostorm is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:45 AM.