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Old Apr 2, 2011, 9:18 AM   #1
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Default Yale University Architecture - Plates 26 - 30

The following were done with a DA15mm f/4, some with a K-r, some with a K10D and some with a K20D. I am since back to a K10D only...

Plate 26 - Kroon Hall - Top Deck. Yale University . 68,800 sq ft, completed January 2009. Photo is of the top deck. Designed by London-based Hopkins Architects, with local firm Centerbrook Architects & Planners as executive architect, Kroon Hall is Yale’s fourth green building and its most ambitious in sustainable terms. It is designed to use 50 percent less energy than a comparable modern building. This building is Rated by the U.S. Green Building Council as LEED-NC, v.2.2, Platinum (59 points) Level. Here the Red Oak paneling is well represented.




Plate 27 - Kroon Hall - Detail, Staiwell to top deck.




Plate 28 -
Woolsey Hall, Yale University - Detail, Stairwell. Woolsey Hall is the primary auditorium at Yale University and seats 2,695 people. It was built as part of the Yale bicentennial celebration in 1901. The architects were Carrère and Hastings, designers of the New York Public Library.



Plate 29 - Dwight Memorial Chapel, Yale University, Old Campus. This may be my favorite shot of the entire series... Originally designed in 1842 by Henry Austin to house the Yale Library, it has been a chapel since 1931. Its name commemorates Timothy Dwight, the elder, and his grandson of the same name, both former Presidents of Yale.

It is actually quite dark in this building. I've lightened it significantly so that the detail is evident. The only light that was in here came from the top gallery and it was quite soft and diffuse in here.

What a pleasure to shoot! The entire time I was in here, there was someone playing the organ. They really were quite accomplished. They were situated up at the end, close to the stained glass and were seated such that they could not see me and I could not see them. Every time they stopped I'd simply stand quietly and wait for them to start again.

I tried perspective correction and some further post-processing on this. While I like the corrected version, it required a fairly large crop, and as such really does not show off the FOV of the DA 15mm. I therefore opted to upload the uncorrected version.

For Mtngal... The corrected version of this, as corrected for Perspective distortion is under the following link. Let me know what you think.

http://photos.papoosepublishing.com/...15260062-5.jpg



Plate 30 - Battell Chapel Chapel, Yale University - Detail, Stairway to balcony in carved oak. Built 1874-76, the chapel was built to provide space for daily chapel, which was mandatory at Yale for students until 1926.


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Old Apr 2, 2011, 7:56 PM   #2
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Wow! I love your first one - that's quite a view! A fascinating design as well as being impressive at LEED Platinum. I'm always partial to wood paneling, it gives such a warm feel to a building.

It's interesting to compare your uncorrected and corrected version of the chapel. Normally I prefer corrected lines, but it doesn't quite give you the soaring feeling that the uncorrected version does - I think I prefer the uncorrected version, distortion and all. Though I will say that I like the correction - you didn't end up with a too fat roof.

Which camera did you use for that picture? It's got more dynamic range than I would have expected - you didn't blow out the stained glass window at the front. I would have expected that you would be unable to get that shot without using some type of HDR method.

And circular staircases are always fun to shoot. I like the way you shot down and used the round end of the handrail to anchor the shot, I would guess that the architect thought about it's visual effect when he designed the building.
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Old Apr 2, 2011, 8:52 PM   #3
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Amazing captures, very Escher 3 and 5.
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Old Apr 2, 2011, 9:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Wow! I love your first one - that's quite a view! A fascinating design as well as being impressive at LEED Platinum. I'm always partial to wood paneling, it gives such a warm feel to a building.
It looks like an Iroquois longhouse to me... not sure if that was the intention. Have never seen that written, but would not doubt it. Same building as Plate 2, way back at the beginning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
It's interesting to compare your uncorrected and corrected version of the chapel... Which camera did you use for that picture? It's got more dynamic range than I would have expected - you didn't blow out the stained glass window at the front. I would have expected that you would be unable to get that shot without using some type of HDR method.
K20D... This one ** is ** HDR. Five frames at 1 stop apart. I am going to take this to mean that I accomplished my goal of using HDR without it looking overwrought. People often overdo HDR - well to be fair, they overdo tone mapping. In this particular case HDR was necessary given how dark it was in there and how I would have completely blown highlight to capture shadow detail. Remember, again, this was somewhere around Ev 2 or less among the chairs. I think and the results are pretty good, but when it came time to tone map it, I used a very subtle touch. This is really very true to the place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
And circular staircases are always fun to shoot. I like the way you shot down and used the round end of the handrail to anchor the shot, I would guess that the architect thought about it's visual effect when he designed the building.
Too much noise for some reason, even using a K-r. But thank you. This is a single shot. There was an overhead light. I got several frames that were way too dark until I realized that the light was effecting the meter through the eyepiece. Did not have a cover so shaded it with a hand. Camera was on a tripod that did not have the legs splayed... so like a monopod. leaning up and over the railing at the top...

Thanks for your comments...

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Old Apr 2, 2011, 10:16 PM   #5
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You did, indeed, succeed with the HDR - it is not at all obviously HDR. Well done, indeed! One of the nice things about the K5 is that ISO 80 is very forgiving. I've just processed one shot that I took during a bracketed series, it was at something like -2 or more and I used fill light in LR to bring up the shadows. The result was close to the HDR version - no added noise at that point.

As far as covering the viewfinder - I've used my thumb far more than I've used the viewfinder cover. I occasionally use the K100 with a Hoya R72 filter and can't remember how to take off the eyepiece cover (it's different than the later cameras). So I usually just use a thumb or hand lightly over the viewfinder - works well enough.
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