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Old Apr 9, 2011, 8:16 PM   #11
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For Photoshop, to use a high pass filter for sharpening - make a copy of the picture, use "Other, High-Pass" under filters and choose a value less than 1.5, usually under 1.0. The layer will be mostly grey with the edges showing lighter only (a higher value will add the effect to stuff that perhaps isn't a true edge). If there's a color along the edges you can desaturate the layer to make it grey and white. Then change the layer's mode to "overlay" - it will accent the edges but not the areas of the picture that don't have any.
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Old Apr 9, 2011, 8:31 PM   #12
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I wish I could contribute to the discussion, but it has gone well beyond my level of expertise. But i just wanted to say that the original is a great shot. Very unsettling, but a great shot nonetheless.
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Old Apr 10, 2011, 3:37 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
For Photoshop, to use a high pass filter for sharpening - make a copy of the picture, use "Other, High-Pass" under filters and choose a value less than 1.5, usually under 1.0. The layer will be mostly grey with the edges showing lighter only (a higher value will add the effect to stuff that perhaps isn't a true edge). If there's a color along the edges you can desaturate the layer to make it grey and white. Then change the layer's mode to "overlay" - it will accent the edges but not the areas of the picture that don't have any.
Thanks Harriet, will give it a try!

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I wish I could contribute to the discussion, but it has gone well beyond my level of expertise. But i just wanted to say that the original is a great shot. Very unsettling, but a great shot nonetheless.
Thanks
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Old Apr 10, 2011, 4:26 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
For Photoshop, to use a high pass filter for sharpening - make a copy of the picture, use "Other, High-Pass" under filters and choose a value less than 1.5, usually under 1.0. The layer will be mostly grey with the edges showing lighter only (a higher value will add the effect to stuff that perhaps isn't a true edge). If there's a color along the edges you can desaturate the layer to make it grey and white. Then change the layer's mode to "overlay" - it will accent the edges but not the areas of the picture that don't have any.
Hi Hariet,
I use high pass sharpening quite regularly, preferrring the results to unsharp mask results ... I find the applied value can be anything up to 10.0 dependent on the file resolution higher res needs higher value, the mode can be set to overlay, soft light or hard light, I tend to use the latter then reduce the layer opacity to get the sharpness without any halo effects. ... Jack.
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Old Apr 10, 2011, 10:18 AM   #15
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I'll have to try hard light - I usually use soft light. Like any of the sharpening methods, not all pictures work with it, I'll use one method for a while until I hit a shot that it doesn't look good with it and then switch to another sharpening method.

I found that if I use USM twice, once for fine sharpening using a very, very small radius, and once for contrast sharpening, I get pretty good results. I've also found that doing it in LAB color mode, sharpening only the L layer, sometimes will give give slightly better results than doing it in RBG (it's less likely to sharpen chroma noise).

Recently I've been using Topaz Lab's Detail for sharpening. I've found settings that I like (not one of their presets) for most things, but it wouldn't be appropriate here since it works by contrast adjustments.
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Old Apr 11, 2011, 2:53 AM   #16
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I'll have to try hard light - I usually use soft light. Like any of the sharpening methods, not all pictures work with it, I'll use one method for a while until I hit a shot that it doesn't look good with it and then switch to another sharpening method.

I found that if I use USM twice, once for fine sharpening using a very, very small radius, and once for contrast sharpening, I get pretty good results. I've also found that doing it in LAB color mode, sharpening only the L layer, sometimes will give give slightly better results than doing it in RBG (it's less likely to sharpen chroma noise).

Recently I've been using Topaz Lab's Detail for sharpening. I've found settings that I like (not one of their presets) for most things, but it wouldn't be appropriate here since it works by contrast adjustments.
OK Hariet,
Some ideas for me to try there, I'd forgotten about sharpening in LAB, I haven't done that for a while. BTW using Hard Light with reduced opacity just produces similar results to Soft light or Overlay, at least I can't detect any difference, but my ageing eyes don't help there ... Jack.
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Old Apr 12, 2011, 2:43 PM   #17
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Hey,
I am not really sure about your question or better to say what exactly you expect for an answer.

If the spider - or at least the part of the spider you wanted to take a picture from - was (just) out of focus, it's out of focus. You can't "move" the focus point with simple postprocessing.

"Sharpen" is widely used for several techniques like local or global contrast enhancement or deconvolution/deblurring, including the use of edge-detection algorithms and so on. All these techniques can only use the information of your image itself and if applied globally will have drawbacks like unwanted noise increase.

There are more intelligent algorithms (complex filters on fourier-transformed images, pathfinding-like approaches to name some), but that's nothing for the average/enthusiast photographer.

That being said this is what I use as a more lazy approach depending on the image/situation/wanted result:
- local contrast enhancement, starting with USM plus using some other algorithms OR
- deconvolution, starting with "inverse" gaussian blur as a neat/cheap and fast method

These are usually the easiest and most common tools to use depending on the software you use.

I know this is ancient technology, but I also enjoy using
- the good old median filter
- a highpass filter

depending on the image data and the wanted sharpening effect.

IF I have an image, that's soft, but focus and DOF is good, I have my own method of "refocussing", I already used it and explained it a bit here: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...on-flie-s.html If you are really desperate, I could try to write some longer and more detailed explanations . Reminder: This technique might not give you the wanted effect on your spider image, as you said it moved "out of focus".

Maybe this lesson, that I learned about "sharpness", will help you too. In short: YOUR sharpness is/might be (very) different from MY sharpness. Somewhat longer: people have (very) different feelings and opinions about that mysterious "sharpness", sometimes you'll put a lot of work into an image and nobody will notice, sometimes you'll think it's fine/good enough and people will tell you it looks soft. Try to find the sweet spot here for yourself or you'll end up unsatisfied with almost every image you take, and that's really nothing you want. I needed some time and experience to tone down my perfectionism to a manageable level or even to forget about it

Another hint: less is more. Not always, but in many cases.

My 2 cents, I hope it helps.

Regards,
Th.

Last edited by thkn777; Apr 12, 2011 at 2:46 PM.
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Old Apr 12, 2011, 4:44 PM   #18
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Thanks th!

Yeah it's subjective, and after a good clean of the Tammy Macro the IQ has improved, probably need to clean the sensor as well, so not sure it was just I hadn't captured the focal point where I wanted it.

I have been playing with high pass and "smart" sharpening worklows for a few days and I'm impressed to the point where I am thinking about going back to quite a few old PEF files and trying it out on images I have previously dismissed. USM just doesn't compare a lot of the time, but curiously I miss the high key effect it produces so half the time I subconsciously add the effect with the curves tool *shrug*
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