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Old May 23, 2011, 10:36 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by mtnman View Post
Ira, I agree, the first set seemed a bit over saturated, while the unprocessed second set seems a bit flat. I have had some success removing haze in landscape shots by dialing down the brightness, and slightly increasing the contrast. That might be worth a try.

By the way, regardless of whether they're oversaturated, or grainy, or dull, these are beautiful images depicting a stunning landscape.
Thanks, it always seems that I can get the compositions right but often have technical issues. I just have to learn to get the technical details right.
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Olympus E-P2, E-P5, OM-D E-M1: 9mm to 150mm lenses

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Old May 24, 2011, 12:02 AM   #12
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If you don't mind, I tried a very little photoshop adjustment. I don't normally add saturation much - it's so easy to get carried away with it. Instead, all I did was use a levels layer and moved the right and left (light and dark) arrows over to where the graph started. Then I used a bit of Topaz Labs Detail for sharpening (I like the contrast sharpening it does, as long as you keep it low) and came up with this as a possible compromise. You could easily do better than this with the original file and a bit more work (I spent less than 5 minutes on it, took longer to type this reply), changing the background a bit more while leaving the whitish rock and trees in the foreground alone.
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Old May 24, 2011, 12:06 AM   #13
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I certainly need to look into software upgrades as well, that is a significant improvement when you take into account the file size. Thank you Harriet.
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Riverview, NB, Canada
http://aicphotography.blogspot.com/
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Current equipment
Pentax K5, K3:
FA 35mm f2, FA 50 f1.4, FA 28-70mm f4, FA 28-80mm f3.5-5.6, FA 80-320mm f4.5-5.6, F 50mm f1.7, Tamron SP 70-200mm f2.8 Di, DA 10-17 f3.5-4.5, DA 14 f2.8, DA 16-45mm f4, DA 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 WR, DA 50-200mm f4-5.6 WR, AF-540FGZ

Olympus E-P2, E-P5, OM-D E-M1: 9mm to 150mm lenses

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Old May 24, 2011, 9:44 AM   #14
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It immediately started looking better using levels, something easily done in PSE (and I assume other programs that are similar). While I really like Detail, and find it not very expensive compared to many other plug-ins, it isn't strictly necessary for working with a flat-looking photo (many of mine taken in Bryce and Zion were quite flat - the lighting wasn't very dramatic but at least the dynamic range was more manageable). I just prefer how it sharpens things over how the various tools available in photoshop (for normal things, not everything). I find most of their pre-sets way over-the-top and almost didn't buy it until I found gentler settings that worked well. I've ended up setting up a photoshop action for each of two cameras we use most of the time (they need different settings), setting up the layer as a smart object (I have the CS4) so I can change it if needed.

But the main thing with this was to use levels to adjust both the lightest and darkest points in the picture according to the histogram. That gives it more contrast. Also, by adjusting the left (dark) slider over, to make the darks darker, it automatically introduces more saturation (sometimes, but not always and certainly not here, it can get out of hand and give you something else to deal with).
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