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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:40 PM   #1
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Default Sunny Meadow

With bright sunny days and highs near 90 farenheit, East Tennessee is looking and feeling more like summer every day!

Forests are cool and shady, so most of the blooming action is moving into the sunny meadows
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:43 PM   #2
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Daisies are not native to our region, but they sure are a common meadow bloom! The name comes from "day's eye" - maybe because they look a bit like the sun, the "eye" of the day?
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:45 PM   #3
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Sunny damp meadows are also perfect habitat for Black Eyed Susans. Like the daisies, these are in the Composite family - each bloom is actually a bouquet of many small flowers - ray florets make the "petals," and disk florets make the middle part of the bloom.
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:47 PM   #4
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Tiny Deptford Pink has just started blooming in the hot wet fields. Some folks call these "the poor man's weatherglass," because they start to close when a storm is approaching.
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:49 PM   #5
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Our native Carolina Roses have also just begun to bloom, as has the orange-flowered milkweed called Butterflyweed.
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:52 PM   #6
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Butterflyweed is well-named! Here is an Orange Sulphur enjoying the abundant nectar...

(any preferences among the different poses?)
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:54 PM   #7
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And here is a Great Spangled Fritillary (Vole's favorite butterfly) also enjoying some Butterflyweed nectar...

(again, any preferences among the different poses?)
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 8:56 PM   #8
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Not all the butterflies are after nectar. We almost never see Little Wood Satyrs or Northern Pearly Eyes on flowers, but do enjoy seeing them soaking up the almost-summer sun!
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 9:01 PM   #9
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Of course, no hot sunny East Tennessee meadow would be complete without some dragonflies! Here are an Eastern Pondhawk, several views of a Banded Meadowhawk (just emerged and not yet in full color), and a Clubtail (still working on the species name...)
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Old Jun 4, 2011, 9:04 PM   #10
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Hope your season is progressing well, and that you enjoyed this stroll through almost-summertime in the East Tennessee fields. Thanks for your comments, critique & suggestions!
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